ARLA savages London mayor’s latest bid to control rents

first_imgLondon mayor Sadiq Khan has officially requested powers to regulate the private rented sector in the capital and issued a detailed report into its housing market.His proposals include introducing rent controls and open-ended tenancies and increasing notice periods to four months.Khan also wants to set up a city-wise register of landlords and rents and a new London Private Rent Commission to implement, monitor and enforce controls.The proposals go further than many other schemes that have been tried elsewhere including not only capping rent rises but also decreasing rents between tenancies until they become affordable.And in a somewhat contradictory move, the Mayor also says he wants to encourage investment in new and existing rental housing supply.“Unlike other Mayors around the world, I have no powers over the private rented sector,” says Khan.“That’s why this landmark report sets out a detailed blueprint of what the Government must do to overhaul tenancy laws, and what powers City Hall needs from them to bring rents down.”Industry reaction so farDavid Cox (left), Chief Executive of ARLA Propertymark, says: “Rent controls do not work; it hits hardest those it’s designed to help the most, and the Mayor of London has failed to learn the lessons of history.“The last time rent controls existed in this country, the private rented sector (PRS) shrunk to the lowest levels ever recorded.“At a time of demand for PRS homes massively outstripping supply, rent controls will cause the sector to shrink.“In turn, this means professional landlords will only take the very best tenants, and the vulnerable and low-income people that rent controls are designed to help, will be forced into the hands of rogue and criminal operators, who may exploit them.”Read the mayor’s report in full.Mayor of London rent controls Sadiq Khan July 22, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » ARLA savages London mayor’s latest bid to control rents previous nextARLA savages London mayor’s latest bid to control rentsMayor’s bid to regulate rents, introduce open-ended tenancies and increase notice periods to four months have been savaged by ARLA.Nigel Lewis22nd July 20190916 Viewslast_img read more

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Flood warning for Arkansas River affecting Sumner County in effect…

first_imgThe following statement was issued by the National Weather Service in Wichita…FLOOD STATEMENTNATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WICHITA KS258 PM CDT MON AUG 5 2013…The flood warning continues for the following river in Kansas…Arkansas River At Derby affecting Sedgwick County. Arkansas River Near Mulvane affecting Sedgwick and Sumner Counties. Arkansas River At Oxford affecting Sumner County.center_img Arkansas River At Arkansas City affecting Cowley County.PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…Do not drive into flooded areas or go around barricades. Shallow flowing water can wash a car from the roadway.The Flood Warning continues forThe Arkansas River At Oxford.* At  2:45 PM Monday the stage was 18.7 feet.* Flood stage is 17.0 feet.* Minor flooding is occurring and Minor flooding is forecast.* Forecast…The river will continue rising to near 19.2 feet by Tuesday morning. The river will fall below flood stage Tuesday evening.* Impact…At 18.0 feet…Low lying agricultural fields flood north of the river gage site.FLD    OBSERVED           FORECAST 7 AMLocation          STG    STG  DAY TIME     Tue    Wed    ThuOxford          17.0  18.7  Mon 03 PM   19.2   15.4   13.5last_img read more

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Big names set to sizzle at MVP meet

first_imgRaymond GrahamGleaner WriterToday’s MVP Track and Field meet will take focus inside the National Stadium this evening, with the promise of top quality athletics, given the early form shown so far this season.Following last Saturday’s outstanding performances from several of the country’s top senior athletes including an world leading equalling 11.07 seconds in the women’s 100m from Elaine Thompson, fans are in store for three hours of top class performances once again with the main event expected to start at 3:00pm because of the overwhelming support of entries.Meet organiser Paul Francis is excited about the meet and the support it has received.”We have received over 400 entries and because of this we will have to start a bit earlier, running several heats but the main event with the top seeded athletes will commence at 5:00pm,” said Francis.With this being the last chance for athletes to sharpen up ahead of the Penn Relays it should be great competition for both high school athletes as well as those from clubs and colleges.The Penn Relays will take place in Philadelphia, USA between April 28 – 30.Besides the 4x100m and 4x400m there will be action also in the 4x800m relays with 100m, 200m, 400m, 800m, 100m hurdles, 110m hurdles along with 400m hurdles also facing the starter.An exciting battle is expected in the men’s 100m as former world champion Yohan Blake of Racers Track Club will lead a high quality field with the likes of Sprintec’s Rasheed Dwyer, MVP’s Andrew Fisher and World Championships 200m finalist Zharnel Hughes all posing a threat.World Championships bronze medal winner Shericka Jackson is also expected to feature in the women’s 400m event.Following her defeat to GC Foster College’s Rhonda Whyte in the women’s 400m hurdles, Edwin Allen High schoolgirl Shannon Kallawan, will be hoping to avenge that defeat when both clash once again in an event, which also includes some of the country’s top athletes who will be bidding for spots on Jamaica’s team to the Rio Olympic Games.These include the likes of Sprintec’s Ristananna Tracey, MVP’s Nikita Tracy and the University of West Indies’ Rushell Clayton, who will be defending her collegiate title at the Penn Relays.Today’s meet will also be a good opportunity for high school teams in the relays. Following two sub-40 seconds clocking so far this season, Kingston College led by Jhevaughn Matherson and Akeem Bloomfield will be hoping for another big performance but with defending Penn Relays champion Calabar expected to insert outstanding Class II athlete Christopher Taylor in their line-up, this could make it more difficult for the North Street – based team.Both teams will be pitted against Racers and MVP units, which will also be interesting to see how the schoolboys do against their seniors.Among the girls Penn Relays favourite St. Jago is expected to parade their strong 4x100m team, which is expected to include the likes of Kimone Shaw, Shaniel English and Shanice Reid.However, defending Penn Relays champion Edwin Allen with the likes of Patrice Moodie and Shellece Clarke along Holmwood Technical with Ashley Williams and company could make it difficult for the St. Jago quartet.TODAY’S ORDER OF EVENT5:00 P.M: 4X100M FEMALE5:00 P.M: LONG JUMP MEN5:10 P.M: 4x100M MALEDISCUS FEMALE5:20 P.M: 800M FEMALE5:25 P.M; 800M MALE5:35 P.M: 400M HURDLES FEMALE5:40 P.M 400M HURDLES MALE5:50 P.M : 4X800M FEMALE6:00 P.M: 4X800M MALE6:10 P.M: 400M M FEMALEDISCUS MALE6:20 P.M: 400M MALE6:30 P.M LONG JUMP6:45 P.M: 200M FEMALE6:55 P.M: 200M MALE7:10 P.M: 100M H FEMALE7:15 P.M; 110M H MALE7:55 P.M: 4X400M FEMALE8:00 P.M: 4X400M MALElast_img read more

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HSE TAKE QUIT SMOKING CAMPAIGN TO TV

first_imgOn January 1st 2012, the HSE will broadcast three short films that expose the sad reality of losing a loved one to a tobacco related disease.  Produced as part of the HSE’s QUIT campaign, these films feature real people’s stories which focus on one key fact – that 1 in every 2 smokers will die of a tobacco related disease.The broadcast of these short films on New Year’s Day is designed to connect with smokers on the one critical day in the year when many of them will consider quitting. It is also envisaged that the stories told in the films will help family and friends of smokers to encourage their loved ones to quit. The 3 minute films will be broadcast on the evening of New Year’s Day on RTÉ at 8.45pm during Fair City and at 9.28pm after the 9 O’Clock News, on TV3 at 7.45pm during Family Fortunes and on Universal during Harry’s Law at 9.45pm.  They will also be available to view at www.hse.ie, www.quit.ie and at the You Can QUIT facebook page www.facebook.com/HSEquit.  The HSE will also use Facebook and Twitter to remind viewers to tune in to the films on TV and the internet.The QUIT short films tell three different real life stories but focus on one harsh fact; that 1 in every 2 smokers will die of a tobacco related disease.Film 1: Pauline’s story (7.45pm on TV3 and 9.45pm on Universal) Pauline Bell from Wexford is a mother of two. Three years ago her husband George died from a heart attack at 48 years of age.  George was a heavy smoker.  Pauline has volunteered to tell her and George’s story as part of the QUIT campaign.  She talks about what a great husband he was, how ‘he loved his cigarettes, but never thought that at 48, that would be his time to go’, and how she, her children and their family has been affected by his loss.  She hopes to inspire others to quit – for their own health, and to prevent other families experiencing what they have been through. Watch Pauline’s story here http://youtu.be/6mOVwh4VyegFilm 2: Gerry’s story (8.45pm on RTÉ 1)Gerry Collins from Wicklow is MD of Jobsource Recruitment (www.jobsource.ie) and a survivor of throat cancer. In his QUIT film, Gerry describes how he got into smoking as a young man, despite playing Football for Kilmacud Crokes GAA Club and making the Dublin Senior Team at the time. His cancer diagnosis, which came in his early 50s, was a devastating experience, and the treatment was in his own words, ‘pretty severe’.  He and his daughters Lisa and Ciara describe how frightening his illness was, and Gerry comments that he ‘has many years ahead of me, and I put that all at risk, by smoking’.  Watch Gerry’s story here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9lZrw2SKQq4Film 3: Margaret’s Story (9.28pm RTÉ 1)Margaret O’Brien is from Kilkenny, and is doing her Leaving Cert this coming summer.  Margaret’s Mum Jackie was a long term smoker, and was diagnosed with lung cancer at 45 years of age. Sadly, Jackie passed away only a year later, in the summer of 2010.  Margaret has the support of her Dad, John, in taking part in the QUIT campaign, and has previously been involved in fund raising for the Irish Cancer Society – going so far as to shave her head in early 2011 and raising over €2,000 for in the process. In her film, Margaret talks about her Mum, what she misses most about her, and how although she knew smoking was harmful, and it could lead to cancer, she would also have thought  – ‘no one could be that unlucky’.  Describing the impact of her loss she says, ‘it’s not just for a day, it’s not just for a month, it’s for the rest of my life without her’.  Watch Margaret’s story here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAUuxBTZ510Dr. Fenton Howell, Director of Public Health, HSE outlines why the HSE has taken this approach to the QUIT campaign:  ‘Evidence from all over the world has shown the impact that real-life, personal stories, like Pauline, Gerry and Margaret’s, can have on smokers’ drive to quit.  We spoke in detail to Irish smokers before we started this campaign, and they told us that this ‘1 in every 2’ statistic was powerful, and that using real-life stories to illustrate it would motivate them to stop smoking.  We’re very grateful to all the people who are bringing this campaign to life by telling their stories – they are central to the meaning and success of this campaign.’Results to date for the QUIT campaign show that the 1 in every 2 statistic has hit home with smokers in Ireland, with many choosing to get help and support for their Quit attempt online and in person.   Over 6,500 people have signed up for online QUITplans since the campaign started in June, nearly double that of the same period in 2010.  Visits to www.QUIT.ie have increased by over 60% to 58,800 since June and calls to the National Smokers’ Quitline 1850 201 203 – which is run by the Irish Cancer Society, a key partner in this campaign – and referrals to our Smoking Cessation Clinics also increased by 50% compared to last year.  The HSE’s You Can QUIT Facebook page was created for this campaign, and has over 14,500 Likes to date, with many of them choosing to share their experiences and seek support from each other. www.facebook.com/HSEquit. If you want help to QUIT smoking:Visit www.quit.ieJoin www.facebook.com/HSEquitCall the National Smokers’ Quitline on 1850 201 203 (open 30th and 31st December, and New Year’s Day; closed Monday 2nd January 2012) Contact your local HSE smoking cessation counsellorTalk to your GP, Pharmacist or Dentist FACTS ABOUT SMOKINGSmoking is the single biggest cause of illness, disability and death in Ireland.  There are about 1 million smokers in Ireland and, each year, 5,500 Irish people die of a tobacco related disease. Many thousands more lives are shattered by the illness, disability and bereavement that cigarettes cause.70% of smokers say they want to quit and 40% try to quit every year. Most people quit successfully after a few attempts, and while many go it alone on will power, those quitters who use supports like our National Smokers’ Quitline, online help, smoking cessation services or medications are twice as likely to succeed.Only 7% of people know that 1 in every 2 smokers will die of a tobacco related disease.  Our aim in this campaign is to make people realise the effect smoking has on their health, and their loved ones, and give them encouragement and help to QUIT.Recent Irish data shows an average cost of €7,700 every time a smoker is admitted to hospital with a tobacco related disease. In 2008, there were over 36,000 such admissions.  That cost does not include out-patient costs, GP visits, medicines and other supports provided by the HSE. If we can prevent just 100 of the 36,000 annual admissions to hospital with tobacco related disease, this campaign will pay for itself.The QUIT campaign is supported by a wide range of health partners, which include the Irish Cancer Society (who provide the Quitline service), Irish Heart Foundation, Irish College of General Practitioners, Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland, Irish Pharmacy Union, Irish Dental Association, ASH Ireland, Asthma Society of Ireland, TobaccoFree Research Institute, Environmental Health Officers Association, National Youth Council of Ireland, Irish Thoracic Society, Royal College of Physicians in Ireland and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Alpha One Foundation, Heads of Psychology Services Ireland, Psychological Society of IrelandEvidence from around the world shows that campaigns like this have an important role in reducing smoking rates over their lifetimes.  We also know that the tobacco control campaigns which work best are the ones which take a hard-hitting tone, warning of the dangers of smoking – why to quit – and then offer a range of supports to help people to try to stop – how to quit.The evidence base for this campaign message comes from a study which is often called “The Doctors Study” (Doll R, Peto R, Wheatley K, Gray R, Sutherland I. Mortality in relation to smoking: 40 years observations on male British doctors. British Medical Journal 1994; 309:901-911).   This study started in 1951 in the UK, had a 40 year follow-up, and was finally published in 1994.  It found that we had substantially underestimated the hazards of long term tobacco use.  It showed that half of all regular cigarette smokers will eventually be killed by their habit.A further study 10 years later on the same study participants confirmed the findings.  In fact, it suggested that the situation might be worse, in that up to two thirds of smokers could be killed by their smoking (Doll R, Peto Boreham J, Sutherland I. Mortality in relation to smoking: 50 years observations on male British doctors. British Medical Journal 2004;328(7455):1519).HSE TAKE QUIT SMOKING CAMPAIGN TO TV was last modified: December 30th, 2011 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:HSE QUIT CAMPAIGNlast_img read more

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Help save Donegal lives by walking from Darkness Into Light this May

first_imgResidents in Donegal have been urged to join the global fight against suicide and self-harm on May 11. Last year thousands of people registered to attend events around the county raising a total of €136,993 to support our vital services.This year almost 250,000 participants in over 200 venues across 19 countries and five continents will walk from Darkness Into Light. The event, organised by Pieta, is a global movement dedicated to ending suicide and supporting those who engage in self-harm.Speaking on this movement of hope, Marie Peelo, Deputy Director of Funding & Advocacy said: “From rural communities to major cities, suicide is an epidemic that affects all communities.“In 2017, one person a day died by suicide in Ireland – nobody is immune to suicide.“We want to live in a world where suicide is replaced by hope, where self-care replaces self-harm and where stigma is replaced by acceptance. “The only way we can tackle this crisis is together – in our communities, in our places of work, in the sports clubs we are part of. With the help of our community, we can help prevent suicide.”Since opening its doors 13 years ago, Pieta has heard painful truths from thousands of people who have come to the organisation at the point of suicidal crisis or actively engaging in self-harm, which is one person every 40 seconds.Worldwide, close to 800,000 people die due to suicide every year.Donegal walkers can register or find their nearest venue online at www.darknessintolight.ie.Help save Donegal lives by walking from Darkness Into Light this May was last modified: March 30th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Contractor to be appointed next month for Killybegs Harbour extension

first_imgIt has been confirmed on Wednesday that tenders have been received for the works at the Smooth Point at Killybegs Fishery Harbour Centre. Deputy Pat the Cope Gallagher confirmed that the tenders were received by the Department on the May 20th and a contractor is expected to be appointed next month.He said: “Subject to availability it is anticipated that the contractor is to be on site by September 2019, the contract duration is 12 months and preparatory works on the site development such as dredging had already commenced in 2017 and were completed in 2018. “The Smooth Point project at Killybegs Harbour, when complete, will provide a 120 metres quay space. The total cost of this phase including preparation, permitting and design costs stands at €6.5m,” added Pat the Cope.“The additional capacity at the harbour will be of immense benefit to the various harbour users and certainly will assist in the overall long-term sustainable development of Killybegs as the premier harbour in the northwest and west of Ireland.”Contractor to be appointed next month for Killybegs Harbour extension was last modified: July 17th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Censor Pays to Keep Censoring

first_img(Visited 512 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 cartoon by Brett Miller by Dr Jerry BergmanCensor paid $10,000 but refused to un-censor the censored article!About the same time that I was working with my editor to complete the final edits for my latest volume in the Slaughter of the Dissidents series,[i] I came across the following headline: “Journal Apologizes and Pays $10,000 After Censoring Article.” It was written by John G. West for Evolution News, and dated June 7, 2011. [ii]The article describes an egregious breach of academic ethics perpetrated on mathematics professor Granville Sewell from the University of Texas, El Paso. I tell his story in my book, Censoring the Darwin Skeptics, due out this year. The development West wrote about adds to what I had already documented in my book.Sewell had written a paper titled, A Second Look at the Second Law [of Thermodynamics]. In this paper, Sewell simply detailed what is obvious: everything including life is affected by entropy, meaning we get old, our body wears out, and eventually we die. The word entropy is from the Greek entropia, which means “turning toward” and was used in English in 1868 by German physicist Rudolph Clausius to describe the measurement of increasing disorder of all physical processes. The law of increasing disorder challenges Neo-Darwinism because Darwinism requires the opposite to normally occur. Life should start out as a blob of undifferentiated matter and evolve upward until it ends up as humans or some other higher life form.Sewell’s article had been peer-reviewed and accepted for publication by the journal Applied Mathematics Letters. But then, a Darwinist blogger—self-described as an “opinionated computer science geek”—took up a crusade against the paper. Rather than respond to the article (as would have been the appropriate response of a scholar), he simply wrote to the journal editor and denounced it. The editor caved and pulled Sewell’s article in violation of his journal’s own professional standards.The journal’s rules are: the acceptance of an article cannot be rescinded after an author has been notified of its acceptance except only “under exceptional circumstances,” such as fraud, major errors, or ethics violations. When a complaint is lodged against an author, the general rule is for the journal editor to contact the author to give him or her the opportunity to respond or comment. Sewell was not provided with this opportunity before his article was pulled.The editor may have been aware of what happened to biologist Richard Sternberg at the Smithsonian after Sternberg had allowed a peer-reviewed article favorable to intelligent design to be published in the biology journal that he edited. (To find out what happened to him for that infraction, see Evolution News.)They seem willing to do virtually anything to silence their critics —John WestOne of the favorite claims of the Darwin lobby is the claim that intelligent design scientists do not publish peer-reviewed research. The fact is, intelligent design scholars do publish peer-reviewed articles in spite of the Darwin lobby’s efforts to censor them. After Dr. Sewell’s article was pulled, West says, “Darwinian zealots crowed about their achievement and maliciously speculated that the article was withdrawn because it wasn’t really peer-reviewed or because it was somehow substandard”. The editor apologized and set the record straight, stating that “Dr. Sewell’s article was peer-reviewed and accepted for publication.” He then paid $10,000 to settle the claim. Justice done? No; he refused to reinstate the article even after admitting that the article was not withdrawn because of “any errors or technical problems found by the reviewers or editors”!The Unutterable C-WordOne of the most egregious cases illustrating the all-too-common habit of censorship by Darwinists happened in 2016 when a peer-reviewed scientific paper was retracted solely for using the phrase “proper design by the Creator.” Only two words were mentioned as objectionable in the retraction, namely “design” and the capitalized word “Creator.” As noted by Evolution News & Science Today, there appeared to be some confusion in the translation from Chinese to English, with the authors unaware of connotations of the “C-word” in American academic culture. The exact words of the publisher’s retraction post were: “Following publication, readers raised concerns about language in the article that makes references to a ‘Creator.’”  This serious sin by the authors was treated as even more egregious to PLoS than if they had published erroneous medical research that resulted in the loss of lives.Thus, a single word can result in a retraction if it casts any doubt about Darwin. The corresponding author was Huazhong University of Science Professor Cai-Hua Xiong. The mistake, now dubbed “CreatorGate,” resulted in the journal, PLoS One, experiencing an unprecedented storm of controversy.[iii]  So serious was use of this one word that the public relations manager for PLoS, David Knutson, wrote that “the academic editor who handled the paper has apologized for his serious error, and was asked to step down.”[iv]As John West correctly wrote, there exists a war on science today, but it’s not being waged by creationists (or by any skeptics of Darwinism). Instead, it’s being wagedby Darwinian fundamentalists who are attempting to prevent any voices except their own from being heard in the scientific community. They seem willing to do virtually anything to silence their critics—from denying them tenure, to preventing them from being hired, … to censoring peer-reviewed articles by scholars with whom they disagree.[i] Jerry Bergman, Censoring the Darwin Skeptics. Southworth, WA: Leafcutter Press, 2017.[ii] https://evolutionnews.org/2011/06/journal_apologizes_and_pays_10/.[iii] Kaplan, Sarah 2016. “#CreatorGate: How a study on hands sparked an uproar about science, God and ethics in publishing.” The Washington Post March 8, 2016.[iv] Kaplan, Sarah.Dr Jerry Bergman, professor, author and speaker, is a frequent contributor to Creation-Evolution Headlines. His Author Page includes a list of his previous articles. See also his three-volume series published by Leafcutter Press that details the unfair treatment received by those who dare to question Darwinian evolution:Slaughter of the Dissidents, (2011).Silencing the Darwin Skeptics, (2016).Censoring the Darwin Skeptics, due out this year.last_img read more

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Digital Presence This commonly includes your IP a

first_img Digital Presence: This commonly includes your IP address (which can often pinpoint you to a precise physical address), email account, online file storage, and the components of personal/business websites. Last, I will leave you with a primer on internationalization with Doug Casey. Income: The structuring of your cash flows to reduce dependence on any one source in any one jurisdiction. Establishing additional sources of revenue, international investment opportunities and trends, and setting up an offshore company. Yourself: Obtaining a second passport from another country and establishing legal residency in foreign countries. As many of you may know, International Man has its roots in the book of the same name. It was first published in 1978 by best-selling author, speculator, and renowned world-traveler Doug Casey.last_img read more

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FEMA is planning to sell off thousands of leftover

first_imgFEMA is planning to sell off thousands of leftover trailer homes in Texas.The Federal Emergency Management Agency sent the trailers for temporarily homeless families after Hurricane Harvey struck in August 2017. But not all of them were used. Now FEMA is auctioning the leftovers online to the public with a minimum bid of $100 for trailers that range from 1 bedroom units, valued at $57,354, to 3-bedroom units with a value of $70,965.This practice is controversial (more on that later).And it brings up the question: What happens to surplus humanitarian aid?Bassam Michel Ibrahim, head of global logistics for the Norwegian Refugee Council, an international aid group, says that a surplus of humanitarian supplies should be a rare occurrence. In his experience, relief organizations are consistently up against a lack of funding and a lack of supplies.According to Ibrahim, aid missions usually go through an intense planning process to ensure that all supplies are delivered and used as intended. This detailed process allows aid groups to report to their donors exactly how their money is being used, and it means there are almost never leftovers.If there is a surplus, Ibrahim says it’s usually because problems arise that are outside of their control – like conflict breaking out or a landslide cutting off the only road to a village – that prevent them from delivering the aid. Nonetheless, surpluses do occur.Guillaume Brumagne, a logistics supervisor at Doctors Without Borders, says that the medical aid group deals with leftover supplies on a regular basis because their teams bring a lot of items – including drugs, medical equipment and shelters – when they arrive in a country to address a health crisis. Once the crisis is over and it’s time to scale down, they must figure out what to do with what’s left.”The general rule within [Doctors Without Borders] is always to try to see how can these items benefit another partner within the country,” says Brumagne.Brumagne says that whether the item is a used tent or unused medical equipment, they try to donate it to a similar actor in the area – possibly the ministry of health, a local health clinic or another medical charity. If they can’t find someone in the medical field who can use the item, they donate it in a way that still helps the local population. For example, Doctors Without Borders has donated tents to create more classroom space for schools.The one thing they try to avoid is giving supplies to someone who will then sell them.”The foundation of what we do is bringing aid to people that is completely free, accessible and without any kind of discrimination,” Brumagne says. “Even if in the end we don’t use the aid ourselves, we want to find a way for it to benefit the people it’s supposed to benefit, without them having to pay for it.”Both Ibrahim and Brumagne say they’ve never seen a reason to sell aid instead of donate it.”Why would we?” says Ibrahim. “There are always more needs than we are able to meet.”Other aid agencies, including those that are part of the U.S. government, also try to donate surplus property from disaster relief efforts. But in some instances, as in Texas, arms of the U.S. government do sell things off. In fact, there are official channels for them to do so, whether the excess supplies are trailer homes, tents, office supplies or other items. According to the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA), federal agencies may sell unneeded property to the public through GSA’s auction system if no other government agencies or qualified voluntary organizations are interested in it.The official policy FEMA sent NPR says that when the agency’s trailer homes are deemed “unsuitable for disaster survivors elsewhere,” FEMA can either put them up for auction or sell them to the current occupants.In the wake of Hurricane Harvey, FEMA was criticized for selling trailer homes at “cut-rate prices after 18 months of use or the first sign of minor damage.” Since then, the agency has said they sell mobile homes at an “adjusted fair market value,” not cut-rate prices or for pennies on the dollar. The official policy that FEMA provided to NPR does not address at what age or in what condition the units are put up for sale.Although the U.S. government willingly sells certain disaster-relief supplies, regulations prohibit the sale of government-issued military and humanitarian meal rations. So if you see them offered by an online retailer, for prices like $100 for a case of 10 meals on eBay, they’re likely being sold by the recipients themselves by the company that makes them.Janet Nelson, who co-owns TheEpicenter.com – an Oregon-based company that sells emergency supplies – says her company only carries overstock humanitarian daily rations from manufacturers. When the government doesn’t purchase the entire order placed with a manufacturer, the manufacturer repackages the kits for civilian use and sells them to dealers like Nelson’s company. She says the last time they sold humanitarian daily rations was right after Hurricane Katrina.And then there are the reports that FEMA tents were used at the failed Fyre Festival – a luxury music festival held on a Bahamian island in April 2017 that quickly spiraled into an epic fail, from lodging to meals to security.The mainstream media and social media widely reported that leftover FEMA disaster-relief tents were the accommodation for festival-goers, who spent thousands of dollars to attend. That claim is repeated in two new documentaries about the festival.But that’s not the case. Clay Kimsey, a sales representative for the manufacturer (Shelter Systems) says the tents were purchased brand-new through a third-party vendor that was “not any type of humanitarian group.””Yes, those were our structures,” he says, and they have on occasion sold their tents to relief organizations and government agencies. In the case of the Fyre Festival, they were sold for recreational use at an event that turned out to be a disaster.Joanne Lu is a freelance journalist who covers global poverty and inequity. Her work has appeared in Humanosphere, The Guardian, Global Washington and War is Boring. Follow her on Twitter: @joannelu Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

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Three times a week 66yearold Tod Gervich inject

first_imgThree times a week, 66-year-old Tod Gervich injects himself with Copaxone, a prescription drug that can reduce the frequency of relapses in people who have some forms of multiple sclerosis. After living with the disease for more than 20 years, the self-employed certified financial planner in Mashpee, Mass., is accustomed to managing his condition. What he can’t get used to is how Medicare’s coinsurance charges put a strain on his wallet.Unlike commercial plans that cap members’ out-of-pocket drug spending annually, Medicare has no limit for prescription medications in Part D, its drug benefit. With the cost of specialty drugs increasing, some Medicare beneficiaries could owe thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket drug costs every year for a single drug.Recent proposals by the Trump administration and Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., would address the long-standing problem by imposing a spending cap. But it’s unclear whether any of these proposals will gain a foothold.The 2006 introduction of the Medicare prescription drug benefit was a boon for seniors, but the coverage had weak spots. One was the so-called doughnut hole — the gap beneficiaries fell into after they accumulated a few thousand dollars in drug expenses and were then on the hook for the full cost of their medications. Another was the lack of an annual cap on drug spending.Legislative changes have gradually closed the doughnut hole so that this year beneficiaries no longer face a coverage gap. In a standard Medicare drug plan, beneficiaries pay 25 percent of the price of their brand-name drugs until they reach $5,100 in out-of-pocket costs. Once patients reach that threshold, the catastrophic portion of their coverage kicks in, and their obligation drops to 5 percent. But it never disappears.It’s that ongoing 5 percent that hits hard for people, like Gervich, who take expensive medications.His 40-milligram dose of Copaxone costs about $75,000 annually, according to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. In January, Gervich paid $1,800 for the drug, and he paid another $900 in February. Discounts that drug manufacturers are required to provide to Part D enrollees also counted toward his out-of-pocket costs. (More on that later.) By March, he had hit the $5,100 threshold that pushed him into catastrophic coverage. For the rest of the year, he’ll owe $295 a month for this drug, until the cycle starts over again in January.That $295 is a far cry from the approximately $6,250 monthly Copaxone price without insurance. But, combined with the $2,700 he had already paid before his catastrophic coverage kicked in, the additional $2,950 he’ll owe this year is no small amount. And that assumes he needs no other medications.”I feel like I’m being punished financially for having a chronic disease,” he says. He has considered discontinuing Copaxone to save money.His drug bill is one reason Gervich has decided not to retire yet, he says, adding that an annual cap on his out-of-pocket costs “would definitely help.”Drugs like Copaxone that can modify the effects of the disease have been on a steep upward price trajectory in recent years, says Bari Talente, executive vice president for advocacy at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Drugs that five years ago cost $60,000 annually now cost $90,000, she says. With those totals, Medicare beneficiaries “are going to hit catastrophic coverage no matter what.”Specialty-tier drugs for multiple sclerosis, cancer and other conditions — defined by Medicare as those that cost more than $670 a month — account for more than 20 percent of total spending in Part D plans, up from about 6 percent before 2010, according to a report by the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, a nonpartisan agency that advises Congress about the program.Just over 1 million Medicare beneficiaries in Part D plans who did not receive low-income subsidies had drug costs that pushed them into catastrophic coverage in 2015 — more than twice the 2007 total — according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation.”When the drug benefit was created, 5 percent probably didn’t seem like that big a deal,” says Juliette Cubanski, associate director of the Program on Medicare Policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation. “Now we have such expensive medications, and many of them are covered under Part D — where, before, many expensive drugs were cancer drugs” that were administered in doctors’ offices and covered by other parts of Medicare.The lack of a spending limit for the Medicare drug benefit sets it apart from other coverage. Under the Affordable Care Act, the maximum amount someone generally owes out-of-pocket for covered drugs and other medical care for this year is $7,900. Plans typically pay 100 percent of customers’ costs after that.The Medicare program doesn’t have an out-of-pocket spending limit for Part A or Part B, which cover hospital and outpatient services, respectively. But beneficiaries can buy supplemental Medigap plans, some of which pay coinsurance amounts and set out-of-pocket spending limits. Medigap plans, however, don’t cover Part D prescription plans.Counterbalancing the administration’s proposal to impose a spending cap on prescription drugs is another proposal that could increase many beneficiaries’ out-of-pocket drug costs.Currently, brand-name drugs that enrollees receive are discounted by 70 percent by manufacturers when Medicare beneficiaries have accumulated at least $3,820 in drug costs and until they reach $5,100 in out-of-pocket costs. Those discounts are applied toward beneficiaries’ total out-of-pocket costs, moving them more quickly toward catastrophic coverage.Under the administration’s proposal, manufacturer discounts would no longer be treated this way. The administration says this would help steer patients toward less expensive generic medications.Still, beneficiaries would have to pay more out-of-pocket to reach the catastrophic spending threshold. Thus, fewer people would likely reach the catastrophic coverage level at which they could benefit from a spending cap.”Our concern is that some people will be paying more out-of-pocket to get to the $5,100 threshold and the drug cap,” says Keysha Brooks-Coley, vice president of federal affairs at the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network.”It’s kind of a mixed bag,” says Cubanski of the proposed calculation change. “There will be savings for some individuals” who reach the catastrophic phase of coverage. “But for many, there will be higher costs.”For some people, especially cancer patients taking chemotherapy pills, the lack of a drug-spending cap in Part D coverage can seem especially unjust.These cutting-edge, targeted oral chemotherapy and other drugs tend to be expensive, and Medicare beneficiaries often hit the catastrophic threshold quickly, says Brooks-Coley.Patty Armstrong-Bolle, a Medicare patient who lives in Haslett, Mich., takes Ibrance, a pill, once a day to help keep in check the breast cancer that has spread to other parts of her body. While the medicine has helped send her cancer into remission, she may never be free of a financial obligation for the pricey drug.Armstrong-Bolle paid $2,200 for the drug in January and February of last year. When she entered the catastrophic coverage portion of her Part D plan, the cost dropped to $584 per month. Armstrong-Bolle’s husband died last year, and she used the money from his life insurance policy to cover her drug bills.This year, a patient assistance program has covered the first few months of coinsurance. That money will run out next month, and she’ll owe her $584 portion again.If she were getting traditional drug infusions instead of taking an oral medication, her treatment would be covered under Part B of the program, and her coinsurance payments could be covered.”It just doesn’t seem fair,” she says.Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit news service, is an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation. Neither KHN nor KFF is affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Michelle Andrews is on Twitter: @mandrews110. Copyright 2019 Kaiser Health News. To see more, visit Kaiser Health News.last_img read more

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More than 130 people in the US die of an opioid

first_imgMore than 130 people in the U.S. die of an opioid overdose every day. One of the most effective ways to save lives is to get those struggling with addiction treated with medication to stop their cravings. But a loophole in federal law might block at least one new opioid-addiction drug from coming to market for years.Many patients have to try several medications before finding one that works for them and that they can stick with.”It’s important to have multiple different treatment options for different patients, different circumstances,” says Carolyn Bogdon, a family nurse practitioner who oversees outpatient medication-assisted treatment programs at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, S.C.Some use methadone, which they get every day. Others use Vivitrol, which can be injected once a month. And many use buprenorphine, which comes in tablets and a dissolvable film that people take once or twice a day. Buprenorphine is an opiate, but it blocks the cravings associated with addiction without giving people the same high.A handful of patients at the university’s clinics have moved to a form of buprenorphine called Sublocade that’s injected just once a month. And if the company that makes Sublocade gets its way, the drug will be the only long-acting buprenorphine on the market for five more years.FDA and ‘orphan drugs’That’s because a quirk in federal law may prevent a competing drug called Brixadi from going on sale until 2024. “It’s ready for market now,” says Mike Derkacz, CEO of Braeburn, which makes Brixadi. “We are deemed safe and effective by FDA, but we are unable to make the product available to patients during this crisis.”Sublocade was approved for sale in 2017 and, like any new drug, was granted three years of exclusive access to U.S. markets. That time is up next year. But in December, the Food and Drug Administration told Braeburn it might have to wait four more years because Sublocade was designated an “orphan drug,” which gives it seven years of exclusive access. Sublocade, which is made by Indivior, isn’t an orphan drug in the traditional sense. Normally, these are medications that treat illnesses affecting fewer than 200,000 people a year. Opioid addiction is not a rare disease.In 2017, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, about 2.3 million people in the U.S. were addicted to prescription opioids or illicit opiates such as heroin, and 47,000 people died of an overdose.The Trump administration declared opioid addiction a public health emergency that same year — just a month before Sublocade hit the market — and made helping people get medication-assisted treatment a priority.That’s why the makers of Brixadi were shocked when the FDA gave their product only tentative approval in December. Derkacz says it doesn’t make sense, in the middle of what many call an epidemic, to treat buprenorphine drugs as if they treat a rare disease.”There have been studies that show a reduction in mortality by 40% with buprenorphine,” Braeburn’s CEO says. “That keeps people alive. That gives people a chance to get back to their lives and recover fully.”A back-door approachSo why is Sublocade considered an orphan drug? Like many things related to prescription drugs, the reasons are wonky and sort of irrational.Indivior created its first buprenorphine-based drug, called Subutex, in the 1990s. At the time, treating addiction with other drugs wasn’t mainstream. There were methadone clinics in some U.S. cities, but they were heavily regulated by law.The company asked the FDA to give it orphan drug status — but instead of saying there weren’t many potential patients, Indivior said it had little hope of earning back its investment in Subutex and needed extra time with no competition. Few drugs have ever received orphan status this way. But at the time, it made sense to the FDA.The orphan designation was granted, and Subutex hit the market in 2002.Since then, Indivior has made billions in revenue from sales of the drug and its successors, Suboxone and Sublocade, partly because the orphan designation is automatically attached to every new formulation of buprenorphine the company makes.Indivior’s executives declined to be interviewed for this story. But in response to written questions, the company says, “Indivior stands by FDA’s decision, which was supported by both the law and the facts at that time.”Derkacz says Braeburn has asked the Food and Drug Administration to revoke Sublocade’s orphan status. And an FDA spokeswoman says the agency is actively considering that request.The right drug ‘can save their life’Long-acting, injectable treatments for addiction have some advantages over tablets and dissolvable films. Patients don’t have to remember to take medication each day, and they can avoid the drugstore.”It provides a little bit more anonymity for patients that don’t want to disclose that they have an opiate use disorder,” says Michelle Lofwall, a psychiatrist and medical director at two University of Kentucky clinics that treat patients struggling with opioid addiction.”Some patients have felt stigmatized when going to the pharmacy, like they don’t feel like they’re necessarily treated all that well once they show their prescription,” she says.Lofwall participated in Brixadi’s clinical trial, so she’s one of the few health care providers who has used both medications. She says they’re slightly different and that she’d like to have the choice to offer her patients.”From a public health perspective, and just as a provider physician trying to treat patients, they need to have all the options,” Lofwall says. Being on the right drug “literally can save their life.””As a clinician, it’s always important for me to have more tools,” Andrea Barthwell, an addiction treatment specialist, wrote in public comments on Braeburn’s FDA petition. “Moreover, there are gaps in care from the current buprenorphine treatment options that Brixadi may fill.”Brixadi can be used weekly as well as monthly, allowing doctors to see their patients more frequently and monitor them more closely at the start of treatment, according to several comments.Another issue is cost.Sublocade costs about $1,580 per month, according to marketing materials from Indivior, and some insurance companies won’t pay for it. “In Kentucky,” Lofwall says, “we haven’t been able to get it for patients who are on several different Medicaid managed-care programs.”By contrast, a generic version of the buprenorphine film costs about $140 a month, according to the website GoodRX.com.Daniel Smith, who leads the medication-assisted treatment program at Mary’s Center in Washington, D.C., says he doesn’t know any doctors who use Sublocade now.”Long-acting buprenorphine is definitely advantageous over short-acting for many reasons, but cost and availability have been the challenge,” he says.But if a competitor drug came on the market, Smith says the price of Sublocade might fall, and he might then be willing to prescribe it to his patients. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

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A note from the editor For nine years Disability

first_imgA note from the editor:For nine years, Disability News Service has survived largely through the support of a small number of disability organisations – most of them user-led – that have subscribed to its weekly supply of news stories. That support has been incredibly valuable but is no longer enough to keep DNS financially viable. For this reason, please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support its work and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please remember that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring, and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS… Two opposition parties are writing urgent letters to work and pensions secretary Esther McVey – while a third is demanding an investigation – about a possible cover-up over documents linking the “fitness for work” test with the deaths of benefit claimants.Senior figures from both Labour and the Liberal Democrats said this week that they were writing urgently to McVey to ask whether the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) had shown the documents to the independent expert the government commissioned to review the work capability assessment (WCA) in 2013 and 2014.The Green party’s co-leader, Jonathan Bartley, said the failure to be clear about what happened with the documents had “all the hallmarks of a deliberate cover-up”. He has called for an independent investigation.The SNP also said it would be seeking answers from DWP.Dr Paul Litchfield (pictured) was commissioned by DWP to carry out the fourth and fifth reviews of the WCA but has so far refused to say if he was shown letters written by two coroners and a number of secret DWP internal “peer reviews” into deaths linked to the WCA regime.Litchfield, who was recognised by the prime minister with a CBE in last month’s birthday honours, published the two reviews in December 2013 and November 2014, but neither of them mentioned the documents, all of which link the WCA with the deaths of claimants.A spokesman for Marsha de Cordova, Labour’s shadow minister for disabled people, said she would be writing to McVey “as a matter of urgency”.Stephen Lloyd, the Liberal Democrat shadow work and pensions spokesman, said: “I will be writing directly to the secretary of state, Esther McVey, to seek clarification whether or not her department, the DWP, ever showed [Litchfield] the documents linking the WCA to the deaths of benefit claimants.“The public has a right to know, particularly now he’s been awarded a gong.”Neil Gray, the SNP’s social justice spokesman at Westminster, added: “This issue has thrown up a number of questions for the DWP and we need a clear and definitive statement on what people knew and when. We will be seeking those answers.”Even though DWP possessed all the coroner’s letters and peer reviews, it has claimed in a freedom of information response that it holds no information in its records on whether they were shown to Litchfield while he was reviewing the WCA.Since Disability News Service (DNS) revealed the existence of the documents in the years after Litchfield’s final report was published, concerns have grown that DWP and its ministers deliberately covered-up evidence of the fatal impact of the assessment on sick and disabled people.The coroner’s letters followed the deaths of two men with mental health conditions in 2010 and 2013 and each warned of further such deaths if changes were not made to the WCA.The call for evidence for Litchfield’s second review was issued on 10 June 2014, five months after coroner Mary Hassell had written to DWP following an inquest into the death of Michael O’Sullivan, who had had significant, long-term mental health problems.Hassell had told DWP that the trigger for O’Sullivan’s suicide had been the conclusion by civil servants that he was fit for work, but she said that neither DWP nor the Atos doctor who had assessed him through the WCA process had asked his GP, psychologist or psychiatrist for information about his mental health.Hassell told DWP that it needed to take action “to prevent further deaths” like Michael O’Sullivan’s.But despite that urgent call, Litchfield’s second review failed to mention Hassell’s letter or a similar letter sent to DWP by another coroner in 2010 following the suicide of Stephen Carré.Litchfield’s two reviews also failed to mention the peer reviews.Peer reviews – now known as internal process reviews – must be carried out by civil servants into every death “where suicide is associated with DWP activity”.One of the aims of these reviews is to “determine whether local and national standards have been followed or need to be revised/improved”, so DWP would find it hard to explain why they would not have been shown to Litchfield, whose job it was to review how the WCA was working.DWP has admitted that at least seven peer reviews written in 2012 mentioned the WCA, and there are almost certainly more that were written by the time Litchfield wrote his final report in late 2014.Litchfield has so far refused to comment about the documents.But Professor Malcolm Harrington, the independent expert who carried out the first three reviews of the WCA in 2010, 2011 and 2012, has already told DNS that he believes he was shown neither the first coroner’s letter (the second letter had not yet been written by the time he completed his third review) nor any WCA-related peer reviews.Bartley said this week: “If the Department for Work and Pensions failed to show Dr Litchfield vital documents linking the work capability assessment with the deaths of benefit claimants, DWP are clearly implicated in a cover-up.“If he was shown them but didn’t mention them in his reports, then so was he.“This has all the hallmarks of a deliberate cover-up over the fatal impact of the assessment on sick and disabled people. “There is no justification for secrecy, it is clearly in the public interest for the truth to be told and there should be an independent investigation of what happened.”A DWP spokeswoman said: “As we’ve previously said, this was an independent review, and DWP provided information alongside other stakeholders – on request.“Any evidence used was referenced in the review.”last_img read more

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Senior Department for Work and Pensions DWP civi

first_imgSenior Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) civil servants have failed to answer key questions about links between the government’s policies and the deaths of disabled benefit claimants, during a face-to-face meeting with grieving parents.Emma Haddad, DWP’s director general for service excellence, and Colin Stewart, its work and health director for the north of England, spent more than an hour in Monday’s meeting with Joy Dove and Eric Whiting, the parents of Jodey Whiting.The Independent Case Examiner (ICE) concluded earlier this year that DWP was guilty of “multiple” and “significant” failings in handling the case of the mother-of-nine, who had her out-of-work disability benefits stopped for missing a work capability assessment (WCA), and took her own life just 15 days later.During the meeting, Dove asked 13 key questions that had been drafted for her by Disability News Service (DNS), based on her daughter’s case and the wider scandal of deaths linked to the actions of DWP ministers and senior civil servants.But Haddad refused to answer many of the questions for legal reasons.Among the questions about her daughter’s case, Dove asked how DWP could have made so many serious safeguarding failings.Her ex-husband asked whether anyone had been disciplined or lost their job over their daughter’s death.Dove asked Haddad why she should believe that DWP had fixed the system when it had made similar promises after so many other deaths.And she asked why DWP kept making mistakes that led to the deaths of disabled people when it had carried out so many secret reviews into deaths linked to DWP actions.Crucially, she also asked about the alleged cover-up which saw DWP fail to show the independent expert ministers had appointed to review the WCA a series of secret reviews into benefit-related deaths and letters written by coroners linked to the assessment process. And Dove asked if she could see the secret review that would have been carried out by DWP after her daughter’s death.Haddad promised Dove that she would provide written answers to all the questions.The meeting took place in the offices of Labour’s Dr Paul Williams, Dove’s MP, in Thornaby-on-Tees.Dove said that Haddad insisted in the meeting that ministers had not ordered her and Stewart to apologise in person, but that they had instead “got together and decided we needed to come here and say sorry”.Dove told DNS she was glad the meeting had taken place, but she warned DWP that this would not be the end of her campaigning, although her legal team would now take the lead in seeking justice for her daughter.She said: “It hasn’t really changed things because she’s dead and she’s not coming back.“I told them that five minutes away from here, my daughter is in that cemetery.”Dove believes Haddad was on the verge of tears when she heard her speak about Jodey and showed her pictures of her daughter.She said: “I thought she had a tear in her eye when I got upset and showed her letters from Jodey saying she was in debt and which said, ‘Please, mam, look after my babies.’“I could see a tear in her eye but at the same time she had to hold it back.”But she said Haddad also told her: “I am a mother of two. I know how you would have felt.”Dove said Haddad and her colleague were left speechless when she told them that campaigners were calling DWP “murderers”.After the meeting, a DWP spokesperson said: “Senior officials have met with Mrs Dove today, to apologise again for the failings in handling her daughter’s case and discuss the lessons learnt.“We fully accepted the Independent Case Examiner’s findings earlier this year and have since reviewed and strengthened our procedures to ensure all vulnerable claimants are safeguarded.”The number of people signing a petition in Jodey Whiting’s name, calling for an independent inquiry into deaths linked to DWP failings, and for evidence of criminal misconduct by civil servants or government ministers to be passed to the police, has now passed 42,000.But that is less than halfway to the target of 100,000 needed to secure a House of Commons debate on the petition.To sign the Justice for Jodey Whiting petition, click on this link. If you sign the petition, please note that you will need to confirm your signature by clicking on an email you will be sent automatically by the House of Commons petitions committeePicture: Joy Dove being interviewed by ITV News after the meetingA note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS…last_img read more

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