Behind enemy lines, Raiders vs. Jets: Five questions with opposing beat writer

first_imgALAMEDA — Here is what Brian Costello, who covers the New York Jets for the New York Post, has to say about Sunday’s Raiders vs. New York Jets game at MetLife Stadium:1. When Jets CEO Christopher Johnson endorsed coach Adam Gase as the head coach in 2020, skeptics immediately considered it a kiss of death. In reality, is there a chance the Jets would dump their head coach after one season if their play deteriorates following wins over the Giants and Washington?Costello: I don’t think the …last_img read more

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ODA updates pipeline construction standards

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Department of Agriculture’s (ODA) Division of Soil and Water Conservation has updated the Ohio Pipeline Standard and Construction Specifications document, which will allow progress while providing guidance to protect the state’s resources and top industry.As part of its duties ODA has the responsibility to recommend soil and water conservation practices and work with other agencies to protect the agricultural status of rural lands adjacent to pipeline projects. The Ohio Pipeline Standard and Construction Specifications were originally developed in 1998 by the Division of Soil and Water Conservation and the Ohio Federation of Soil and Water Conservation Districts to mitigate impacts by a proposed intrastate pipeline.Primary changes to the document include:The addition of silvicultural best management practices, when clearing brush and trees in the right-of-way; andUpdates to the methods of repairing damaged subsurface drainsThis document is a recommendation of what is considered best practice for the protection of Ohio’s soil and water resources during pipeline installation. The standards in this document apply only to pipeline construction activities on agricultural land and are intended to supplement the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission upland erosion control, revegetation and maintenance plan. Practices outlined in the specifications are not to be considered mandatory requirements unless cited by other laws, rules, or legal agreements. Users are encouraged to use them as guidance for development of plans. To view the standards visit the Division of Soil and Water Conservation website. Those with questions on pipeline construction on agricultural land in Ohio should contact the division at (614)265-6610.last_img read more

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Establishing a Network Mindset in 2017

first_imgAdapted from a blog by Jamie Bain, University of Minnesota Extension Educator — Health and NutritionThe Military Families Learning Network (MFLN) Family Transitions concentration area provides education and resources for professionals working with military families to build resilience and navigate life cycle transitions. Our goal is for military families to increase their self-reliance and navigate each transition more successfully than the last. We know that the transitions and challenges military families face are complex.  We also know that we cannot do this work alone.  That is why we have ‘network’ as part of our MFLN name and why we strive to build a network of military family service providers to join us in these efforts. Consider the following thoughts adapted from a blog by Jaimie Bain, University of Minnesota Extension Educator, about creating a network mindset.Curtis Ogden, a senior associate of the Interaction Institute for Social Change, lays out six core tenets of creating a network mindset in his blog post Thinking Like a Network. These tenets have guided the work of myself and fellow “network nerds” for years, and I’d like to share them with you. Throughout this post, I also ask you to consider some critical questions and make some important commitments for our common work in serving military families as we enter into a new year.The first of the six core tenets in the philosophy of “Thinking Like a Network” is adaptability instead of control. To me, this can be the hardest of the six tenets because this means that in order to do our work effectively we need to surrender control to a certain degree. We can plan everything to the last detail and still something is inevitably going to happen that we don’t expect. So, if we work to let go of the illusion that we have control over everything, it could allow us to free up that part of our minds that is trying to control things, and potentially open up our capacity for greater creativity.In 2017, I want us to consider this question: “How can we let go and allow for the natural flow and organic progression of the work to take over?”The second core tenet is contribution before credentials. We know in our hearts through the connections we make in the community that everyone has their own inner brilliance, regardless of their credentials. America Bracho, Executive Director of Latino Health Access in Santa Ana, CA shared at a recent conference that this means respecting, valuing, and engaging all voices in our work. Even more so, this means that the people with credentials and privilege have a responsibility to create space to allow for those without credentials to let their brilliance shine.In 2017, I ask all of us to think about whose voices we value in this work and why. What voices aren’t being valued or are being forgotten altogether? How can we help amplify them?The next core tenet is resilience and redundancy instead of rock stardom. We’ve all seen it happen: a small nonprofit organization starts with a dynamic, energetic, and visionary leader and the organization does amazing work in the community. But as soon as that leader retires or moves on, the organization falls flat, struggles to survive, and sometimes even fades away. So how can that organization stay afloat and even thrive without the dynamic and visionary leader it started with? The article The Networked Nonprofit from the Stanford Social Innovation Review has an answer for us. Given the complexity and wickedness of the problems we currently face, organizations must cultivate deep and meaningful relationships with others in order to accomplish their mission and vision.In 2017, I implore us all to take a critical look at the extent to which our work is networked. If you were to take a new job, retire, or win the lottery tomorrow, how would your work continue? Is there resiliency in your connections and redundancy in the functions of what you do so that your work would live on even without you? If not, how are you building connections so that your work can continue and thrive when you are no longer leading?The fourth core tenet is diversity and divergence rather than the usual suspects and forced agreement. Sometimes it’s easier for us to make decisions by ourselves or with a group of likeminded people, so we can just get the work done already. Even though the work can get done faster when it is done in this way, it also means that we aren’t taking in the full complexity of the issue at hand. We aren’t considering all sides, all perspectives, all angles of what we are trying to accomplish when we don’t engage diverse and divergent perspectives in our decision making processes.In 2017, I want us all to take a hard look at who has seats at the tables where decisions are made. Are we surrounded by the usual suspects, the people who always make the same decisions because they are like minded or because they don’t want to rock the boat? Or are we inviting diverse perspectives and volunteering to engage in sticky, uncomfortable, and difficult conversations? I urge us all to remember this quote when we make decisions in 2017: “Nothing about us, without us, is for us.”The fifth core tenet is self-organization and emergence rather than permission and the pursuit of perfection. This tenet is about embracing the gray of the work, instead of trying to force every program, project, or idea to have a black-and-white solution and a tidy package. This means allowing for emergence and iterative design to guide our work. In addition, it means following our intuition. We all know what it feels like when we hit on an idea that feels electric and our gut tells us, “There’s something here!” Allowing ourselves to pursue our gut feelings and allowing people we supervise to do the same is essential to our work. We need to trust that building relationships and following our intuition could lead to failure, and it could also lead to success beyond our wildest dreams.In 2017, I encourage us to commit to embracing the gray and opening up to the potential of wild success.The final core tenet is to shift the focus from the core to the periphery. I learned from my wise friend, colleague, and geospatial lover Noelle Harden that ecosystems are most productive at their intersections, where peripheries overlap. So too are communities and networks. For those of us who work in the periphery, it can seem like decisions with far-reaching repercussions are made at the core in places like; military installations or at our nation’s capital or in the conference room of an organization without the important input and context we could provide. Because we know that efforts are stronger and more impactful when diverse groups are involved we may feel helpless during the decision-making process and then frustrated when an opportunity to be involved wasn’t available.But it doesn’t have to be that way. You can choose to be more involved. Maybe you choose to communicate with your supervisor to request support to work with new potential partners.  Maybe you choose to prioritize spending your efforts reaching out to work with others with similar goals. Maybe you choose to get involved in your local neighborhood association, join the board of an organization, write a letter to the editor, run for city council or the school board. Maybe you choose to talk to your legislator. Now is the time to make the choice to get involved and to advocate for what you believe in.We invite you to choose to network with Military Families Learning Network by learning more about MFLN Family Transitions, follow us on Facebook (MFLN Family Transitions) or Twitter (MFLNFT).  Join us on future webinars. Offer to write a blog or record a podcast. The ability of communities to collaboratively support military Service members and their families depends on each one of us stepping forward to network with others on these shared goals.In 2017, I encourage us all to think about when we are acting from the core or the periphery. When you are acting from the periphery, ask yourself how you can engage with the core as well as others from the periphery to collaboratively address issues.As I reflect on MFLN Family Transitions’ work, I feel grateful for all the inspiring and powerful relationships we’ve had the honor to make in our work with many military family service professionals across the nation. In fact, my favorite part of being a member of a network is working with others who also believe in the power of connectivity. I believe because we are all passionate about providing support for military Service members and their families we  can work  cooperatively to make the world a better place. We need each other to do our work more effectively and we are more powerful together than individually. This means we are already a network. In the Military Families Learning Network, we are a network of people working toward a common vision of supporting significant positive outcomes for military Service members and their families. Because of the complex issues faced by military families it is necessary that now, more than ever, our work requires us to adopt a network mindset. So in 2017, let’s commit to thinking like a network.last_img read more

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Clippers are Griffin’s team more than ever with Paul gone

first_imgBrace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Read Next “He’ll bring the ball up at times. He’ll be one of the guys we use as a facilitator.”Griffin will be whatever the Clippers need at the moment. And that figures to be more than their leading scorer.“We’re going to be a different team,” Griffin said. “It’s just the nature of getting so many new guys, but that’s a good thing. We’ve had some regular-season success but we haven’t had true success here. Now’s a good time to move forward.”Griffin, 28, has All-Star center DeAndre Jordan back in the middle. Danilo Gallinari is the new small forward. Patrick Beverley — who came over in the Paul trade — takes over at point guard, and either Lou Williams or Austin Rivers will start at shooting guard.That’s a lot of new.ADVERTISEMENT “It’s going to take some time with this many new guys,” Griffin said. “It’s on the guys who are coming back, who have been here year after year, to kind of help lead the way a little bit and show them how we dothings here.“We’re going to be a team that’s fun to watch. Get up and down and play hard.”That was a recurrent theme at the Clippers’ media day on Monday. Despite the loss of Paul — considered by many the league’s best point guard — the Clippers expect to run more this season than ever.“I think (his loss) mandates a change in style,” Rivers said. “Probably the style I’m more familiar to begin with. I’ve always been a ball-movement coach. I think we can get back into that.“I do want to play at a higher pace. You go into camp and you look at your team and you’ll find the pace that they want to play at. I think we should be an up-tempo team, an early-strike team. We should be a very physical team.”Even with Paul, the Clippers never could advance beyond the Western Conference semifinals. Some demanded change, and change has arrived.“I’m excited about this new challenge,” Griffin said. “It’s going to be fun.” Los Angeles Clippers’ Blake Griffin poses for photos during an NBA basketball media day Monday, Sept. 25, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES — For six years, they were the Los Angeles Clippers’ dynamic duo, a one-two punch that led the team to the playoffs every season.Chris Paul and Blake Griffin were one of the most respected twosomes in the game. The Clippers won over 50 games each of the past five years.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ NBA: Kawhi, George seek more for Clippers than beating Lakers PLAY LIST 01:48NBA: Kawhi, George seek more for Clippers than beating Lakers00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Kyrie Irving excited about joining revamped Celtics Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. And now they are no more.With Paul’s contract up, the Clippers traded their nine-time All-Star to the Houston Rockets in theoffseason.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutNow more than ever, the Clippers are Griffin’s team — a very different team with nine new players.“There will be times when Blake is the tallest guy on the floor,” coach Doc Rivers said. “We want him to be an aggressive player, an attack player. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

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10 months agoChelsea hero Pat Nevin: Big 2019 to look forward to

first_imgChelsea hero Pat Nevin: Big 2019 to look forward toby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea hero Pat Nevin believes the club has plenty to look forward to in 2019.He wrote for the club’s website: “Obviously changing a manager is a stressful business, but rarely has that change looked so smooth than it has with the introduction of Maurizio Sarri. “The football is as pleasing on the eye as you could hope for much of the time and the club certainly looks to have taken on board most of the modern technical and tactical football ideas out there.”Maybe the best thing about where we are now at the end of the year is the excitement about the year to come. It will be interesting, enjoyable, entertaining and hopefully successful. It will of course have its ups and downs, but what would I wish for most in the year to come at Chelsea? Like many of us in 12 months’ time I hope once again to be saying the phrase, ‘Eden Hazard has had another great year for Chelsea’. If we can say that, then we will probably have some more silverware too.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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When Did Florida State, Jimbo Fisher First See Video Of Dismissed QB De’Andre Johnson Punching Woman?

first_imgDe'Andre Johnson seen on camera punching a woman.De’Andre Johnson Florida StateOn Monday, Florida State dismissed four-star freshman quarterback De’Andre Johnson after a video surfaced of the dual-threat QB punching a woman in a Tallahassee bar in June. Some were critical of FSU and head coach Jimbo Fisher for taking until Monday night to dismiss the talented prospect. Fisher and Florida State officials, though, claim they see the video tape until it was published online yesterday. Via @JShankerESPN: #FSU officials didn’t see video of Johnson punching woman until it was published on Tallahassee Democrat site Monday— Mark Schlabach (@Mark_Schlabach) July 7, 2015#FSU official said Seminoles coach Jimbo Fisher didn’t see video until Monday night because he was traveling in West Virginia— Mark Schlabach (@Mark_Schlabach) July 7, 2015In the end, all that really matters is that Johnson was dismissed and justice gets served. But that’s pretty hard to believe.last_img read more

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Michigan Lands 2018 Recruit Jalil Irvin

first_imgjalil irvinjalil irvinJalil Irvin, a 6-foot-3, 270-pound player from Stone Mountain, Georgia, has officially committed to the Michigan Wolverines. Irvin dropped the news on Twitter Friday morning, adding that since he still has two years of high school left, he’ll be taking official visits elsewhere. Irvin isn’t yet ranked by 247 Sports, but he does have offers from two other schools – Illinois and Tulane.Think you officially a Michigan commmit #GoBlue pic.twitter.com/78dSlEO3P4— Jalil Irvin (@only1_lil) June 3, 2016Irvin is Michigan’s third 2018 commitment – joining Leonard Taylor and Antwuan Johnson.last_img read more

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What Does A Winning Streak Mean In MLB

More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed Welcome to the latest episode of Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight’s sports podcast. On this week’s episode (Sept. 12, 2017), we discuss an American tennis champion finally not named Williams — Sloane Stephens, ranked 957th in the world earlier this summer, won the U.S. Open last weekend. We break down what her victory may mean for U.S. tennis and whether Serena Williams’s absence from the tournament played a role in Stephens’s win. Next, we discuss two remarkable streaks in the MLB — the 20 wins in a row by the Cleveland Indians and the recent stretch of 11 losses by the Los Angeles Dodgers — and whether we should take baseball more seriously just because it’s September. Plus, a significant digit on the MLB playoffs.If you have suggestions for what we should call our new NBA podcast, please drop us a note at [email protected] are links to things we discussed this week:For quality John Starks content, be sure to follow Kate Fagan on Instagram.Kate’s Starky Bear.FiveThirtyEight’s MLB predictions.FiveThirtyEight’s Neil Paine writes that September baseball doesn’t matter more than any other month’s.Victor Mather in The New York Times tells a tale of two MLB streaks.Significant Digit: Zero, the number of teams supported by Chad, Kate and Neil — all devoted Mets fans — that will make the MLB playoffs this year. Is your favorite team out? We discuss strategies for how to choose the best bandwagon to join. Embed Code FiveThirtyEight read more

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Commentary Reds Indians managers produce same results with different styles

Courtesy of MCTBoth the Cleveland and Cincinnati baseball organizations have managers that are familiar with winning. Although the two men have different managing techniques, they both seem to know which buttons to push. Cleveland’s Terry Francona’s loose way of orchestrating seems to fit his team’s persona. On the other hand, Cincinnati’s Dusty Baker’s calm approach to guiding a team appears to work, but has not gotten his team over the hump to win a championship.It is not farfetched to believe the Indians can win a championship with Francona at the helm. The former Boston manager won two titles with the Red Sox, one where his team defeated the Tribe in the American League Championship Series before winning it all in 2007.With a little over half of his first season as the Tribe’s manager under his belt, Francona has seen a fair amount of success with his new team. The Indians are second in the division, trailing the Tigers by 2.5 games. In recent years, the Indians have been in this identical position leading up to the All-Star break, but then find themselves in the back of the pack by season’s end. With the way the season has gone so far, it’s looking more and more like Francona has a formula that will keep his team in the playoff race into September.Cleveland’s skipper has a bit of a loose approach when it comes to managing. He likes his players to have fun on the field, and his loose personality appears to be working well with the team’s character. An example of Francona’s easy going style came before the start of the season when the team took part in the nationwide craze of making a “Harlem Shake” dance video.Although Cleveland has gone through a few managers over the past ten seasons the Reds have not, as Baker is in his six straight year with the organization.Although some may want Baker out of Cincinnati, no one can complain about him leading his ball club to two division titles in the last three years. The Reds won their division both in 2010 and again in 2012. Before the 2010 season, the only time Cincinnati had won the central division was in 1995. That year also marks the last year the Reds made the playoffs prior to the Baker era. He has turned the franchise into a consistent playoff contender.As great as it is that Baker has won division titles in Cincinnati, the higher goal is to get deep into the playoffs and win a World Series. The last two playoff appearances for the Reds have been the opposite of that. In 2010, Cincinnati was swept in three games in the divisional series against Philadelphia. The 2012 squad had a 2-0 lead on San Francisco before losing the next three games at home in the divisional series. Baker has been an outstanding manager in regards to getting his teams to the playoffs, but the playoff appearances are short-lived.Baker’s managing style is mainly laid back and relaxed, though there are times where he gets intense and wears his emotions on his sleeve. How the squad is this season, he may have to be more forward than usual in order to get his team on a roll. This 2013 team appears to be the type needing a constant push, seeming to have no sense of urgency. During one of the club’s more recent hitting slumps, second baseman Brandon Phillips said they would eventually get out of it. Baker needs to be more assertive and tell his players that eventually is not good enough.Both managers have the makeup of bringing championships to their respective cities. With this being Francona’s first year in Cleveland, he has a couple seasons to prove himself. Baker does not have that luxury with this being his sixth year in Cincinnati.The rest of the season is important to both franchises and managers as each are making a playoff push. read more

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Mens Hockey Jeremy Hoy focuses on preparation in first season with Ohio

The Ohio State men’s hockey team gathers prior to the start of the game against Wisconsin on Feb. 23 in the Schottenstein Centern. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorAssociate strength and conditioning coach Jeremy Hoy joined the Ohio State men’s hockey team in early August. Long before, the Buckeyes had seen his work firsthand, even if they didn’t know his name.“When I was at Robert Morris, we played Ohio State,” Hoy said. “In talking to these guys, they’re just like ‘Man, every time we turn around you guys were there. You never got tired, you were always hitting us.’”Before joining Ohio State, Hoy worked as a strength and conditioning coach all over the country. He’s coached at his own gym in Pittsburgh, with the gold medal-winning 2018 US Under-18 Women’s National Team and most recently at Robert Morris University, where the Colonials faced off against Ohio State multiple times during Hoy’s career. Hoy said he prides himself on the way he prepares his teams for the ice. He spends his time working out players, evaluating them during practice to identify their needs and, above all, making sure the team is game ready.“I’m responsible for a lot of aspects of physical preparation,” he said. “I’m making sure the guys are ready to go, I’m working with the athletic training staff to make sure they’re healthy … I’m going to recondition them, making sure they’re ready to go and they’re game ready all the time.”One aspect of the job Hoy focuses on is the relationship he forms with the team and each individual player. He works with each player to assess where they are and ensure they are in the best possible condition when they hit the ice. With the science behind strength and conditioning improving since Hoy entered the field nearly 20 years ago, there is a greater focus on each individual player rather than assuming a strength and conditioning routine works for everyone. The lessons from Hoy and the athletic training staff, however, don’t end in the weight room, or even on the ice.“What I feel like we’re doing is not preparing them to possibly play hockey at the next level … but we want them to be able to contribute to society in a positive way beyond college,” Hoy said. “When they’re done we want them to be able to enter the real world and have a positive impact from what they do.”Once the preparation is finalized for each game, Hoy said he holds a different perspective when his team enters the rink. Coaches and players focus on running plays and optimizing their strategy on the ice to win. Hoy still wants the team to win, but he has a different set of expectations for his players than most going into their games.“I feel like I haven’t done a good enough job if our team is being out-skated, out-conditioned, even out-hustled,” Hoy said. “I want to get the guys going. I want to be the one winning in all those areas every time. I also feel like I’m not doing my job if guys aren’t game ready.”While Hoy has only been at Ohio State for about a month, head coach Steve Rohlik believes he’s already left an impression on the team.“In the small sample we’ve had, he’s made a big impact,” Rohlik said. “No. 1 because he wants to be here … his energy, his knowledge and what he brings, his history, and the work he’s done for almost 20 years. Our guys have bought into his tremendous work ethic.”As Hoy prepares for his first season with Ohio State, his message to the team is clear.“I want to be the team that we’re talented and we’re going to outwork you. We’re going to bring both those together,” he said. “That starts here on the ice. Everything we do, it’s a mentality, a mindset that were going to work hard, give 100 percent effort and we’re engaged in doing everything we do.” read more

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Parental controls dont stop teens from watching porn

first_imgParents, take note. If you think that Internet filtering tools – such as parental controls – will stop your teenage child from accessing explicit sexual content online then you may be wrong, a new study suggests.The findings, published in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behaviour and Social Networking, indicated that Internet filtering tools are ineffective.According to the researchers from the University of Oxford in Britain, the use of Internet filtering tools is widespread but there has been no conclusive evidence on their effectiveness until now. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”It’s important to consider the efficacy of Internet filtering. Internet filtering tools are expensive to develop and maintain, and can easily ‘underblock’ due to the constant development of new ways of sharing content,” said co-author Victoria Nash.The research team presented two studies – one exploratory analysis of secondary data collected in the European Union and one preregistered study focused on British adolescents and caregivers – with nearly 15,000 participants. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive”We were also interested to find out how many households would need to use filtering technologies in order to stop one adolescent from seeing online pornography,” said co-author Andrew Przybylski.”The findings from our preliminary study indicated that somewhere between 17 and 77 households would need to use Internet filtering tools in order to prevent a single young person from accessing sexual content,” Przybylski added.The results from follow-up study showed no statistically or practically significant protective effects for filtering. The researchers noted that there should be more research done to solidify these findings.last_img read more

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NASA offers internships for Tico high school students

first_imgTwo Costa Rican high school seniors will have the opportunity to spend two weeks learning alongside astronauts and other scientists at the Johnson Space Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in Houston, Texas.The internship is part of a NASA program called Space School that promotes vocations within the aerospace industry, and Costa Rica is the only Central American country eligible. The application period begins this week and ends March 7.The project is organized by the Asociación Estrategia Siglo 21 and chaired by former Tico astronaut and scientist Franklin Chang, said the association’s spokeswoman Diana Alvarado.To qualify for a full scholarship, students must be high school seniors between the ages of 15 and 17. A full command of English and average grades of 90 or more in physics, math and chemistry is mandatory. Applicants also are required to demonstrate leadership and communication skills, along with the ability to work as part of a team.Those interested in applying for the internship must submit a 500-word essay in English expressing their interest, stating their purpose in applying and explaining how Costa Rica will benefit from their participation. The application must be attached to two letters of recommendation highlighting academic performance and personal skills.The scholarship includes airfare, departure taxes, hosting, tuition and all participation expenses.Classes will be held at the University of Houston–Clear Lake campus, located next to the Johnson Space Center.Only printed applications will be accepted at the Franklin Chang building, located 1.5 kilometers north of the U.S. Embassy in Pavas, west of San José. Facebook Comments Related posts:Two young Ticos prepare to go to NASA space camp Chevening Scholarship awarded to Tica physician Ad Astra’s deep space rocket moves into new testing phase with help from NASA NASA astronauts celebrate mission anniversary in Costa Ricalast_img read more

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The 5 Takeaways from the Coyotes introduction of

first_img The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Tuesday, Jan. 13Todd Bowles is scheduled to spend the night in NY with him meeting with the Jets and then fly to Atlanta tomorrow— Jason La Canfora (@JasonLaCanfora) January 14, 2015 As teams around the NFL continue searching for candidates to fill vacancies in their organization, Cardinals fans wait with bated breath to see where Arizona defensive coordinator Todd Bowles may end up. Bowles has reportedly interviewed with the Bears, the 49ers and the Falcons. But who had the best shot at snagging him?Here are the latest updates on Bowles’ interviews and potential hirers, according to league reporters: Top Stories A source with ESPN also said Bowles’ interview with the Falcons lasted five hours. The report also said Bowles would have current Cardinals quarterbacks coach Freddie Kitchens in mind for offensive coordinator. McDaniels is staying in New England. #Falcons might not wait for Quinn. Makes Bowles leading candidate at this juncture.— D. Orlando Ledbetter (@DOrlandoAJC) January 11, 2015 Comments   Share   Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires This is, of course, pending whether Bowles remains available. The New York Jets reportedly are very interested in Bowles as well. Where do #Jets stand with their coaching candidates: Dan Quinn and Todd Bowles have emerged above the others. May still talk to Gary Kubiak— Ian Rapoport (@RapSheet) January 11, 2015 confirmed reports Jets, Falcons want to interview Todd Bowles a 2nd time. per source, he did not have 2nd interview w/49ers.— Kent Somers (@kentsomers) January 12, 2015last_img read more

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November 17 2008 We had a twoday visit of 55 arc

first_imgNovember 17, 2008 We had a two-day visit of 55 architecture students of the We had a two-day visit of 55 architecture students of the Instituto Techologico De Tijuana. The students arrived Saturday evening and filled our dorm spaces to capacity. This visit to Arcosanti is part of their study of the philosophy of Architecture. An extended tour of the Arcosanti site took place on Sunday morning and during the afternoon the students had a chance to explore the unique landscape around the site. For information on group bookings please contact Carri Krueger, our guest services coordinator. [Photo & text: sa]last_img read more

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Digital Presence This commonly includes your IP a

first_img Digital Presence: This commonly includes your IP address (which can often pinpoint you to a precise physical address), email account, online file storage, and the components of personal/business websites. Last, I will leave you with a primer on internationalization with Doug Casey. Income: The structuring of your cash flows to reduce dependence on any one source in any one jurisdiction. Establishing additional sources of revenue, international investment opportunities and trends, and setting up an offshore company. Yourself: Obtaining a second passport from another country and establishing legal residency in foreign countries. As many of you may know, International Man has its roots in the book of the same name. It was first published in 1978 by best-selling author, speculator, and renowned world-traveler Doug Casey.last_img read more

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The mainstream media are falling over themselves t

first_imgThe mainstream media are falling over themselves talking about Russia’s just-signed “Holy Grail” gas deal with China, which is expected to be worth more than $400 billion. But here’s what I think the real news is… and nobody’s talking about it—until now, that is. China’s President Xi Jinping has publicly stated that it’s time for a new model of security, not just for China, but for all of Asia. This new model of security, otherwise known as “the new UN,” will include Russia and Iran, but not the United States or the EU-28. This monumental gas deal with China does so much more for Russia than the Western media are reporting. First off, it opens up Russian oil and gas supplies to all of Asia. It’s no coincidence that Russian President Putin announced the gas deal with China at a time when the tensions with the West over Ukraine were growing. Putin has US President Obama exactly where he wants him, and it’s only going to get worse for Europe and America. But before I explain why that is, let’s put this deal in terms we can understand. The specific details have not been announced, but my sources tell me that the contract will bring in over US$10 billion a year of revenue to start with. The 30-year deal states that every year, the Russians will deliver 1.3 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of gas to China. The total capital expenditure to build the pipeline and all other infrastructure for the project will be more than $22 billion—this will be one of the largest projects in the world. You can bet the Russians won’t take payment in US dollars for their gas. This is the beginning of the end for the petrodollar. The Chinese and Russians are working together against the Americans, and there are many countries that would be happy to join them in dethroning the US dollar as the world’s reserve currency. This historic gas deal between Russia and China is very bad news for the petrodollar. Through this one deal, the Russians will provide about 25% of China’s current natural gas demand. In a word, this is huge. It’s also not a coincidence that Putin sealed the deal with China before the Australian, US, and Canadian liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals are completed. If you read our recent Casey Energy Report issue on LNG, you know to be wary of the hype about LNG’s “bright future.” Take note: this deal is a serious negative for the global LNG projects. I also stated in our April 2012 newsletter: Putin has positioned Russia to play an increasingly dominant role in the global gas scene with two general strategies: first, by building new pipelines to avoid transiting troublesome countries and to develop Russia’s ability to sell gas to Asia, and second, by jumping into the liquefied natural gas (LNG) scene with new facilities in the Far East. Pretty bang on for a comment that was made over two years ago in print, don’t you think? So, what’s next? Lots. Putin will continue to outsmart Obama. (Note to all Americans: the Russians make fun of you—not just for your poor choice of presidents, but also for your failed foreign policy that has led to most of the world hating America. But I digress.) You will see Russia announce a major nuclear deal with Iran, where the Russians will build, finance, and supply the uranium for many nuclear reactors. The Russians will do the same for China, and then Syria. With China signing the natural gas deal with Russia and the president of China publicly stating that it’s time to create a new security model for the Asian nations that includes Russia and Iran, it’s clear China has chosen Russia over the US. We are now in the early stages of the Colder War. The European Union will be the first victim. The EU is completely dependent on Russia for its oil and natural gas imports—over one-third of the EU-28’s supply of oil and natural gas comes from Russia. I’ve been writing for years about this, and I’m watching it come true right now: the only way out for the EU countries is to use modern North American technology to revitalize their old proven oil and gas deposits. I call it the European Energy Renaissance, and there’s a fortune to be made from it. Our Casey Energy Report portfolio has already been doing quite well from investing in the European Energy Renaissance, but this is only the beginning. If Europe is to survive the Colder War, it has no choice but to develop its own natural resources. There are naysayers who claim that Europe cannot and will not do that, for many reasons. I say rubbish. Of course, to make money from this European dilemma, it’s imperative to only invest in the best management teams, operating in those countries with the political will to do what it takes to survive… but if you do, you could make a fortune. Doug Casey and I plan on doing so, and so should you. For example, two weeks ago in this missive, I discussed “The Most Anticipated Oil Well of 2014,” where if you invested, in just two weeks you could be up over 40%. Not only did I write in great detail about the company, I even interviewed the CEO because of the serious potential this high-risk junior holds. I said in that Dispatch that the quality of the recorded interview wasn’t first class, but the quality of information was. The company just put together a very high-quality, professional video showing its potential, and I include it here for all to watch. Since my write-up, the company has announced incredible news. It’s only months away now from knowing whether or not it has made a world-class discovery. Subscribers to the Casey Energy Report are already sitting on some good, short-term profits with this story, but it keeps getting better. The more the tension is building in Ukraine (and it’s going to get worse), the more money we’re going to make from the Colder War. There’s nothing you can do about the current geopolitical situation, but you can position yourself and your family to benefit financially from the European Energy Renaissance. Now You Can Take the Lead… We Make It Simple We expect great things from this company and other companies that are exposed to the European Energy Renaissance. You can read our ongoing guidance on this and our other top energy stocks every month in the Casey Energy Report. In the current issue, for example, you’ll find an in-depth report on the coal sector, uranium, and updates on all of our portfolio companies that are poised to benefit most from the European Energy Renaissance. There’s no risk in trying it: If you don’t like the Casey Energy Report or don’t make any money within your first three months, just cancel within that time for a full, prompt refund. Even if you miss the cutoff, you can cancel anytime for a prorated refund on the unused part of your subscription. You don’t have to travel 300+ days a year to discover the best energy investments in the world—we do it for you. Click here to get started. Additional Links and Reads Cambridge House Conference Appearance I am speaking at 3 p.m. PDT on Sunday, June 1 in Vancouver at the Cambridge House conference. Since I’m the hometown boy and have the hometown advantage, the Cambridge House crew put me in the Diversified Hall, and to make sure the rooms were evenly filled with attendees, my competition during that time slot is a panel with four of my friends in the Mining Hall (Brent Cook, Eric Coffin, John Kaiser, and Lawrence Roulston). As Elvis said about the Beatles, “They’re good, but there is four of them and only one of me.” Thank ya, thank ya very much… Sprott Vancouver Natural Resource Symposium 2014 My friend, mentor, and partner Rick Rule is hosting this Symposium July 22-25. Rick has selected most of the companies, and I helped with some of my favorite ones also. I’ll be there, as will Doug Casey, Louis James, and Olivier Garret. It’s a great time of the year in Vancouver, and it’s definitely a show worth seeing. I’ll share more details in upcoming Daily Dispatches, but you may want to reserve your ticket now, as the Symposium is expected to sell out. When you do register, make sure you mention that you got referred by Casey Research. P.S. Don’t tell them I told you this, but the conference always has great wines at the end of each day, when you get to mingle with the speakers—so you’re guaranteed to see Rick, Doug, and me with a glass or two of fine vino in the late afternoon.last_img read more

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Three times a week 66yearold Tod Gervich inject

first_imgThree times a week, 66-year-old Tod Gervich injects himself with Copaxone, a prescription drug that can reduce the frequency of relapses in people who have some forms of multiple sclerosis. After living with the disease for more than 20 years, the self-employed certified financial planner in Mashpee, Mass., is accustomed to managing his condition. What he can’t get used to is how Medicare’s coinsurance charges put a strain on his wallet.Unlike commercial plans that cap members’ out-of-pocket drug spending annually, Medicare has no limit for prescription medications in Part D, its drug benefit. With the cost of specialty drugs increasing, some Medicare beneficiaries could owe thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket drug costs every year for a single drug.Recent proposals by the Trump administration and Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., would address the long-standing problem by imposing a spending cap. But it’s unclear whether any of these proposals will gain a foothold.The 2006 introduction of the Medicare prescription drug benefit was a boon for seniors, but the coverage had weak spots. One was the so-called doughnut hole — the gap beneficiaries fell into after they accumulated a few thousand dollars in drug expenses and were then on the hook for the full cost of their medications. Another was the lack of an annual cap on drug spending.Legislative changes have gradually closed the doughnut hole so that this year beneficiaries no longer face a coverage gap. In a standard Medicare drug plan, beneficiaries pay 25 percent of the price of their brand-name drugs until they reach $5,100 in out-of-pocket costs. Once patients reach that threshold, the catastrophic portion of their coverage kicks in, and their obligation drops to 5 percent. But it never disappears.It’s that ongoing 5 percent that hits hard for people, like Gervich, who take expensive medications.His 40-milligram dose of Copaxone costs about $75,000 annually, according to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. In January, Gervich paid $1,800 for the drug, and he paid another $900 in February. Discounts that drug manufacturers are required to provide to Part D enrollees also counted toward his out-of-pocket costs. (More on that later.) By March, he had hit the $5,100 threshold that pushed him into catastrophic coverage. For the rest of the year, he’ll owe $295 a month for this drug, until the cycle starts over again in January.That $295 is a far cry from the approximately $6,250 monthly Copaxone price without insurance. But, combined with the $2,700 he had already paid before his catastrophic coverage kicked in, the additional $2,950 he’ll owe this year is no small amount. And that assumes he needs no other medications.”I feel like I’m being punished financially for having a chronic disease,” he says. He has considered discontinuing Copaxone to save money.His drug bill is one reason Gervich has decided not to retire yet, he says, adding that an annual cap on his out-of-pocket costs “would definitely help.”Drugs like Copaxone that can modify the effects of the disease have been on a steep upward price trajectory in recent years, says Bari Talente, executive vice president for advocacy at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Drugs that five years ago cost $60,000 annually now cost $90,000, she says. With those totals, Medicare beneficiaries “are going to hit catastrophic coverage no matter what.”Specialty-tier drugs for multiple sclerosis, cancer and other conditions — defined by Medicare as those that cost more than $670 a month — account for more than 20 percent of total spending in Part D plans, up from about 6 percent before 2010, according to a report by the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, a nonpartisan agency that advises Congress about the program.Just over 1 million Medicare beneficiaries in Part D plans who did not receive low-income subsidies had drug costs that pushed them into catastrophic coverage in 2015 — more than twice the 2007 total — according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation.”When the drug benefit was created, 5 percent probably didn’t seem like that big a deal,” says Juliette Cubanski, associate director of the Program on Medicare Policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation. “Now we have such expensive medications, and many of them are covered under Part D — where, before, many expensive drugs were cancer drugs” that were administered in doctors’ offices and covered by other parts of Medicare.The lack of a spending limit for the Medicare drug benefit sets it apart from other coverage. Under the Affordable Care Act, the maximum amount someone generally owes out-of-pocket for covered drugs and other medical care for this year is $7,900. Plans typically pay 100 percent of customers’ costs after that.The Medicare program doesn’t have an out-of-pocket spending limit for Part A or Part B, which cover hospital and outpatient services, respectively. But beneficiaries can buy supplemental Medigap plans, some of which pay coinsurance amounts and set out-of-pocket spending limits. Medigap plans, however, don’t cover Part D prescription plans.Counterbalancing the administration’s proposal to impose a spending cap on prescription drugs is another proposal that could increase many beneficiaries’ out-of-pocket drug costs.Currently, brand-name drugs that enrollees receive are discounted by 70 percent by manufacturers when Medicare beneficiaries have accumulated at least $3,820 in drug costs and until they reach $5,100 in out-of-pocket costs. Those discounts are applied toward beneficiaries’ total out-of-pocket costs, moving them more quickly toward catastrophic coverage.Under the administration’s proposal, manufacturer discounts would no longer be treated this way. The administration says this would help steer patients toward less expensive generic medications.Still, beneficiaries would have to pay more out-of-pocket to reach the catastrophic spending threshold. Thus, fewer people would likely reach the catastrophic coverage level at which they could benefit from a spending cap.”Our concern is that some people will be paying more out-of-pocket to get to the $5,100 threshold and the drug cap,” says Keysha Brooks-Coley, vice president of federal affairs at the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network.”It’s kind of a mixed bag,” says Cubanski of the proposed calculation change. “There will be savings for some individuals” who reach the catastrophic phase of coverage. “But for many, there will be higher costs.”For some people, especially cancer patients taking chemotherapy pills, the lack of a drug-spending cap in Part D coverage can seem especially unjust.These cutting-edge, targeted oral chemotherapy and other drugs tend to be expensive, and Medicare beneficiaries often hit the catastrophic threshold quickly, says Brooks-Coley.Patty Armstrong-Bolle, a Medicare patient who lives in Haslett, Mich., takes Ibrance, a pill, once a day to help keep in check the breast cancer that has spread to other parts of her body. While the medicine has helped send her cancer into remission, she may never be free of a financial obligation for the pricey drug.Armstrong-Bolle paid $2,200 for the drug in January and February of last year. When she entered the catastrophic coverage portion of her Part D plan, the cost dropped to $584 per month. Armstrong-Bolle’s husband died last year, and she used the money from his life insurance policy to cover her drug bills.This year, a patient assistance program has covered the first few months of coinsurance. That money will run out next month, and she’ll owe her $584 portion again.If she were getting traditional drug infusions instead of taking an oral medication, her treatment would be covered under Part B of the program, and her coinsurance payments could be covered.”It just doesn’t seem fair,” she says.Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit news service, is an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation. Neither KHN nor KFF is affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Michelle Andrews is on Twitter: @mandrews110. Copyright 2019 Kaiser Health News. To see more, visit Kaiser Health News.last_img read more

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A note from the editor For nine years Disability

first_imgA note from the editor:For nine years, Disability News Service has survived largely through the support of a small number of disability organisations – most of them user-led – that have subscribed to its weekly supply of news stories. That support has been incredibly valuable but is no longer enough to keep DNS financially viable. For this reason, please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support its work and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please remember that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring, and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS… Two opposition parties are writing urgent letters to work and pensions secretary Esther McVey – while a third is demanding an investigation – about a possible cover-up over documents linking the “fitness for work” test with the deaths of benefit claimants.Senior figures from both Labour and the Liberal Democrats said this week that they were writing urgently to McVey to ask whether the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) had shown the documents to the independent expert the government commissioned to review the work capability assessment (WCA) in 2013 and 2014.The Green party’s co-leader, Jonathan Bartley, said the failure to be clear about what happened with the documents had “all the hallmarks of a deliberate cover-up”. He has called for an independent investigation.The SNP also said it would be seeking answers from DWP.Dr Paul Litchfield (pictured) was commissioned by DWP to carry out the fourth and fifth reviews of the WCA but has so far refused to say if he was shown letters written by two coroners and a number of secret DWP internal “peer reviews” into deaths linked to the WCA regime.Litchfield, who was recognised by the prime minister with a CBE in last month’s birthday honours, published the two reviews in December 2013 and November 2014, but neither of them mentioned the documents, all of which link the WCA with the deaths of claimants.A spokesman for Marsha de Cordova, Labour’s shadow minister for disabled people, said she would be writing to McVey “as a matter of urgency”.Stephen Lloyd, the Liberal Democrat shadow work and pensions spokesman, said: “I will be writing directly to the secretary of state, Esther McVey, to seek clarification whether or not her department, the DWP, ever showed [Litchfield] the documents linking the WCA to the deaths of benefit claimants.“The public has a right to know, particularly now he’s been awarded a gong.”Neil Gray, the SNP’s social justice spokesman at Westminster, added: “This issue has thrown up a number of questions for the DWP and we need a clear and definitive statement on what people knew and when. We will be seeking those answers.”Even though DWP possessed all the coroner’s letters and peer reviews, it has claimed in a freedom of information response that it holds no information in its records on whether they were shown to Litchfield while he was reviewing the WCA.Since Disability News Service (DNS) revealed the existence of the documents in the years after Litchfield’s final report was published, concerns have grown that DWP and its ministers deliberately covered-up evidence of the fatal impact of the assessment on sick and disabled people.The coroner’s letters followed the deaths of two men with mental health conditions in 2010 and 2013 and each warned of further such deaths if changes were not made to the WCA.The call for evidence for Litchfield’s second review was issued on 10 June 2014, five months after coroner Mary Hassell had written to DWP following an inquest into the death of Michael O’Sullivan, who had had significant, long-term mental health problems.Hassell had told DWP that the trigger for O’Sullivan’s suicide had been the conclusion by civil servants that he was fit for work, but she said that neither DWP nor the Atos doctor who had assessed him through the WCA process had asked his GP, psychologist or psychiatrist for information about his mental health.Hassell told DWP that it needed to take action “to prevent further deaths” like Michael O’Sullivan’s.But despite that urgent call, Litchfield’s second review failed to mention Hassell’s letter or a similar letter sent to DWP by another coroner in 2010 following the suicide of Stephen Carré.Litchfield’s two reviews also failed to mention the peer reviews.Peer reviews – now known as internal process reviews – must be carried out by civil servants into every death “where suicide is associated with DWP activity”.One of the aims of these reviews is to “determine whether local and national standards have been followed or need to be revised/improved”, so DWP would find it hard to explain why they would not have been shown to Litchfield, whose job it was to review how the WCA was working.DWP has admitted that at least seven peer reviews written in 2012 mentioned the WCA, and there are almost certainly more that were written by the time Litchfield wrote his final report in late 2014.Litchfield has so far refused to comment about the documents.But Professor Malcolm Harrington, the independent expert who carried out the first three reviews of the WCA in 2010, 2011 and 2012, has already told DNS that he believes he was shown neither the first coroner’s letter (the second letter had not yet been written by the time he completed his third review) nor any WCA-related peer reviews.Bartley said this week: “If the Department for Work and Pensions failed to show Dr Litchfield vital documents linking the work capability assessment with the deaths of benefit claimants, DWP are clearly implicated in a cover-up.“If he was shown them but didn’t mention them in his reports, then so was he.“This has all the hallmarks of a deliberate cover-up over the fatal impact of the assessment on sick and disabled people. “There is no justification for secrecy, it is clearly in the public interest for the truth to be told and there should be an independent investigation of what happened.”A DWP spokeswoman said: “As we’ve previously said, this was an independent review, and DWP provided information alongside other stakeholders – on request.“Any evidence used was referenced in the review.”last_img read more

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