Group reviews election policy

first_imgIn preparation for upcoming elections, Saint Mary’s Student Government Association (SGA) reviewed election policies at Wednesday’s meeting. “We [SGA] have to approve the election policies before we can publicize them to the student body,” student body president Rachael Chesley said. All of the election policies and a list of violations will be available on the student government website. Women’s Health and Wellness Commissioner Brianne Suckow said the grade point average (GPA) policy states that students running for office must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher at the time of election as stated in the official election policies. “I think that it is important to demonstrate the importance of education, but some people during last year’s election mentioned how this made it difficult to find a running mate,” Suckow said. “I think it’s something to discuss.” Student Diversity Board President Morgan Gay agreed, suggesting that the GPA minimum had the potential to exclude candidates, who, aside from their academic history, may have great leadership skills. “I feel like there are a ton of great leaders out there, but this [GPA requirement] may be the only thing that is stopping them from running,” Gay said. Other board members, including Technology Commissioner Laura Ruiz, said the 3.0 GPA stipulation was a standard to which those running for student government should adhere. “Classes are hard. Saint Mary’s is demanding, but I think that as far as representing the best of the best, as student government should do, having a minimum 3.0 GPA is a good line to draw for a minimum,” Ruiz said. “We are supposed to represent the best.” Chesley added statistics to the conversation regarding students at Saint Mary’s and GPAs that she had gathered from the registrar: the median GPA of Saint Mary’s students is 3.295, the mean or average GPA is 3.221, and the total number of students with a 3.0 or above GPA is over 1,000. SGA passed a motion to maintain the 3.0 GPA requirement. The group changed election policies to clarify that a student is not eligible to run for office if she is planning on studying abroad for a semester or academic year during her tenure in office. Voting will take place Feb. 24 for SGA, Residence Hall Association (RHA), and Student Diversity Board (SDB). Voting for class boards will be March 3. “One thing we were passionate about was making sure that the information for elections was open for all students, not just those who have had previous experience with student government,” Chesley said.last_img read more

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Week analyzes college ‘hook-up culture’

first_imgThe “work hard, play hard” mentality and “hook-up culture” that partly contribute to sexual assault on college campuses are not unique to Notre Dame, Gender Relations Center Director Heather Russell said. From 2007 to 2009, there were 21 sex offenses — including eight forcible rapes — reported to campus law enforcement, according to annual statistics from Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) and Saint Mary’s. According to NDSP, there were eight reported assaults during the 2010 calendar year and one since the spring 2011 semester began. This week, the Gender Relations Center is sponsoring its annual Sexual Assault Awareness Week on campus. Sexual assault on college campus stems from the college “hook-up culture,” Russell said. “Some Notre Dame students might feel that ‘no one dates’ and ‘everyone hooks up’ at this University,” Russell said. “In fact, these statements are both myths. Some people at Notre Dame date, and some don’t hook up.” College students tend to compartmentalize their lives and live with a “work hard, play hard” mentality when they try to manage the pressures of any high-achieving university, Russell said. “When an ethic of ‘work hard and play hard’ becomes the operative norm, students naturally segment their lives and their behavior accordingly,” she said, “Working hard from Monday to Thursday and playing hard for the weekend.” This attitude does not create healthy relationships and encourages binge drinking, Russell said, and intoxication becomes the driving force behind the hook-up culture at most colleges. “Intoxication allows students to choose to use each other for sexual gratification, choices the same person likely would not make if he or she were sober,” she said. “In other instances, college students fail to make time to build friendships — their would-be support system during their college years.” The University recently responded to recent criticism of its handing of sexual misconduct charges in a Feb. 17 statement. “The unfortunate reality is that sexual misconduct is a serious issue at colleges and universities across the country, and we are not immune,” the statement said. “Sexual misconduct on college campuses almost always involves students who are acquainted, and alcohol use by one or both parties is a factor in many instances.” The University’s Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Assault Policy states that intoxication inhibits the ability to consent to sexual activity. “A person incapacitated by alcohol or drug consumption, or who is unconscious or asleep or otherwise physically impaired, is incapable of giving consent,” the policy states. The Sexual Assault and Misconduct Policy at Notre Dame also addresses students’ reluctance to report the occurrence of an assault when other rule violations, such as underage drinking, have also occurred. “These behaviors are not condoned by the University but the importance of dealing with them pales in comparison to the need to address instances of alleged sexual misconduct,” the policy states. “Accordingly, in these cases the University will not pursue disciplinary action against a student who claims to be a victim of a sexual assault in connection with the reporting of that sexual assault, or against students named as witnesses to the incident.” Ann Firth, chair of the University’s Committee on Sexual Assault Prevention (CSAP), said alcohol is the number one date rape drug on college campuses around the country, and this reality is one of the contributing reasons for the high number of sexual assaults against college-age women. “While an assault can certainly happen in settings where alcohol is not involved, research shows that the majority of sexual assaults on college campuses involve alcohol use by either assailant or victim,” Firth said. “This trend is reflected on our own campus, in terms of the reported cases of sexual assault.” Connie Adams, assistant director of the Belles Against Violence Office, said Saint Mary’s established a similar amnesty policy in its Code of Student Conduct to encourage students to access the College’s resources without fear of repercussion for underage drinking. “If an individual is assaulted while intoxicated, this may impact the reporting process and healing process for the survivor,” Adams said. Adams also said underlying social issues at the college level are the root of problems with sexual assault. “This is why violence and abuse impact communities across the country,” she said. “The issues of sexual assault, relationship violence and stalking impact college-age women at disproportionately higher rates than other populations.” The University’s statement said Notre Dame is dedicated to thorough investigation of all sexual assault allegations. “Notre Dame takes very seriously its obligation to thoroughly investigate every allegation of sexual misconduct, particularly in light of the gravity, complexity and sensitivity of these cases,” the statement said. “Those who do this important work on our campus are highly qualified and extremely confident.”last_img read more

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Republican election watch ends in disappointment

first_imgThe Notre Dame College Republican election watch only met disappointment when incumbent President Barack Obama beat former Gov. Mitt Romney with enough electoral votes to claim another four years in office Friday night. The crowd spent the night eating pizza and refreshing their newsfeeds as they followed Fox News election alerts in LaFortune Ballroom, but the room emptied when media sources began to call the race as Obama’s. Deirdre O’Leary, a Saint Mary’s freshman from Philadelphia, Penn., watched with the club as her home state went blue. “I’m actually pretty shocked,” O’Leary said. “A couple of hours ago, it looked completely turned around. It didn’t seem it would be predicted as early as it was. I thought Mitt Romney was going to pull it out. I honestly thought he was going to win.” The atmosphere at the College Republicans watch was one of solidarity for O’Leary. “I wanted to watch the presidential results tonight with people with similar views to mine,” she said. “I was considering staying in my dorm with my little interactive map, but I just really wanted to be here in this atmosphere.” For the majority of issues, O’Leary said she allied with the Republican Party. “I think the Republican government will teach people how to be productive and create jobs that will help them get on their feet and really give people the motivation to succeed,” she said. “That’s what America is all about. I think we all need to get America back to work.” O’Leary, who voted via absentee ballot last month, said she thought students in general were afraid to state their views publicly. “You see it on Facebook,” she said. “If someone posts one thing about voting for Obama or Mitt Romney, 50 people comment and attack them.” As the night progressed, the crowd cheered for each state win for the Republican ticket, such as North Carolina and Missouri. Saint Mary’s freshman Gloria Zeiger shared the Republican victories with fellow party members, but she said she expected the Democratic win throughout the night. “I thought Barack Obama was going to win the whole time because incumbent presidents almost always win,” Zeiger said. As a South Bend resident, Zeiger went to the Marshall County polling booth Tuesday morning to cast her ballot. She said she voted mostly Republican.  “I came because I liked knowing I’m not the only Republican around, because sometimes it does feel like that,” she said. “I think it’s important for us to stand up and show that young people have opinions.” Sophomore Mark Gianfalla, the social affairs director for College Republicans, said he saw good debates coming from each candidate, and each big ticket issue affected the swing states differently. “The American people elected the president they wanted, obviously not the person that I wanted, but that’s the beauty of the Electoral College,” he said. Gianfalla, who is from Riverhead, N.Y., called himself “a little voice in a democratic state.” “I think it’s sad that a lot of people on both sides don’t do as much research as they could and vote blindly,” Gianfalla said. “I think there’s room for improvement for people educating themselves on the issues. I’m looking forward to midterm elections in two years, and I hope the president’s four years are positive years for our country.”last_img read more

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Men recall ‘gradual’ shift

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the next in a five-day series discussing the role of women at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, in honor of the 40th anniversary of coeducation at the University this year.  When Notre Dame opened its doors to undergraduate women in the fall of 1972, the University’s approximately 5,000 male students faced what 1976 alumnus Dan Reagan called “a historic occasion.” Reagan, former associate vice president for University Relations, was a member of the first class to admit women as freshmen. “It was written about … and televised and spoken about not only within Notre Dame circles, but it also reached the national level,” Reagan said. “I think CBS was on campus for a few days right at the beginning. … It had an air about it that this was important, that this was a pretty monumental change for the University.” Despite the national attention, admitting women to the University did not change the campus environment as much as expected, 1975 alumnus Frank Devine said. The male students already knew many of the women who transferred from Saint Mary’s College because the schools’ co-exchange program enabled students to take classes at either institution. “These were the women we had worked with at The Observer or WSND or in theater productions,” Devine, currently a producer at “60 Minutes,” said. “These were the women who we were taking history courses at Notre Dame with or English courses at Saint Mary’s.” Because of the schools’ close relationship, Devine said the transition seemed natural. “Sort of the brilliance of what [University President Emeritus Fr. Ted] Hesburgh did was gently change the culture,” Devine said. “You probably won’t hear this from any of the women who felt a little awkward or alienated … but in fact, we were ready for coeducation by the time it came.” The high male-to-female ratio also made the change less jarring than it otherwise would have been, Devine said. Only Badin and Walsh Halls housed women during the first year of coeducation. “It seemed to be very gradual and steady and inevitable, and I don’t recall anybody uncomfortable with the idea,” Devine said. Reagan agreed the change was not overwhelming. “Even though coeducation was just beginning, it was very much a male-oriented school at the time,” he said. “So even when you would attend your class as a freshman, there were just a few women and mostly men.” Many members of the Class of 1976 were not greatly impacted by the transition to coeducation because they had never known Notre Dame any other way, director of admissions Bob Mundy, a 1976 alumnus, said. For students who attended coeducational high schools, the change was even less dramatic. “In my senior year in high school, one of my teachers mentioned this, that Notre Dame was becoming coed,” Mundy said. “It was never really sort of big in my consciousness about attending Notre Dame. … Maybe coming from the public school, it just seemed more normal.” Reagan said he was excited to hear about Notre Dame’s coeducation plans because he came from a family with five boys and attended a high school with many more men than women. “I had already wanted to apply, but I would say that the fact that Notre Dame was now going to be coed to me was a great thing and made me want to be accepted that much more,” Reagan said. “I think it was a really healthy thing and we were happy to hear.” The change to coeducation worked out better than the proposed merger between Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, which fell apart in 1971, Devine said. “There was a time when it looked like the way to go was a merger and we were ready for it and expected it, and it would have probably not worked out as well as just going coed on Notre Dame, largely because [coeducation] forced the University to totally integrate the women into the University structure and life,” he said. “If we had merged, I don’t know if you would have seen any of that.” Contact Marisa Iati at [email protected]last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s students promote modesty through modeling

first_imgHeshima Couture, a faith-based modeling agency founded in 2012 by Saint Mary’s senior Wendy Oduor and junior Erin Cox, strives to embrace the edginess of the fashion world while respecting the human body as a temple of Christ,,Oduor said.Oduor, Heshima Couture creative director, said she and Cox, a photographer, wanted to represent and respect Christ while pursuing their passions of modeling and photography.“When you look at professional models, they have to one day either show their whole body or breasts, and that to me is too much,” Oduor said. “The idea [for Heshima Couture] of faith-based is the idea of modesty.“There’s a verse we use, Corinthians 6:19-20, and it tells us we were bought with a price and we should honor our body because it’s not our own body, its technically God’s.”Heshima means “respect” in Swahili and is part of Heshima Couture’s mission, Cox said. She said spotlighting respect and modesty was Oduor’s and her main goal in looking for words to describe their agency.Their first campaign, which ended in January, was meant to discover the diverse definitions of modesty and how they intertwined with Christ, Oduor said. Oduor said she and Cox asked their models for their definition of modesty at each shoot.“Modesty for me is more of following a commandment that God said,” Oduor said. “Because he says in his word to honor your body, so he is telling me to honor my body.“So when I do it, yes, I do it because I want to I don’t want to expose my body, but most importantly it’s like I am giving respect to my creator, someone who died for me and my sins.”Cox said she wants people to be inspired and hopes the pictures will build confidence in young girls because of Heshima’s models and the way they dress and hold themselves.“I want them to see strong women,” Cox said. “I want them to be inspired by our models and the way that they carry themselves in the photos.“It’s a lot about attitude. We’ve been focusing on that. It’s a lot about the way you want people to perceive you and perceive yourself.“I think that girls having strong role models is one of the most important things. There are so many influences out there and you want to be one of the ones that are good. That’s what we are trying to do.”Oduor said viewers must understand that Heshima Couture is not a run-of-the-mill modeling agency. She said people should be able to see God through a sense of glory in the photos.“I want them to see that God can be a fun activity,” Oduor said. “When you bring religion to some things, some people think it can be boring, but that’s not true. I want them to see that this is cool but see God is in this. I want to make God proud.”Hoping to help up-and-coming models, Oduor said she and Cox have big plans for the future. They want to create contracts with dependable models and fashion designers.“We want to help aspiring models who agree with the same mission statement so we can help them to build their portfolios,” Oduor said. “It’s only a year old, so we are also trying to find a team who are willing to give it all to it.“I want to see all of my models make it up there and still preach the modesty. I want to see Heshima in Vogue and Elle, and with the definition of ‘I’m modest, but I’m still fierce.’”Tags: Fashion, mission, modeling, Saint Mary’s Collegelast_img read more

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ND receives largest ever applicant pool

first_imgRepresenting 112 countries and 6,340 different high schools, the Notre Dame class of 2019 applicant pool set the record for most applications ever received for one class.“This incoming class continues the trend of being more global and diverse than any previous year,” Don Bishop, associate vice president of undergraduate enrollment, said. “Thirty-two percent of the new class will be U.S. students of color or international citizens and over eight percent will be the first in their family to attend college. Notre Dame is arguably the most nationally representative university in the United States.”Susan Zhu | The Observer Bishop said the approximately 2,015 freshmen arriving on campus are some of the most accomplished to ever come to Notre Dame. During their time in high school, 35 percent of the incoming class were heads of a student organization, while 45 percent were captains of a varsity sport and 50 percent were involved in fine arts, drama, music or dance.“The admitted students surpassed the previous exceptional academic records with even higher levels of achievement in leadership and service. We are inspired and impressed with the students who aspire to join the Notre Dame family,” Bishop said.According to the admissions office, Notre Dame uses a holistic admission process that considers students for their exceptional academic and intellectual promise and creativity, as well as their leadership and entrepreneurial records and sense of service to others.“This is another great class entering Notre Dame, selected from a record-breaking applicant pool,” Bob Mundy, director of admissions, said. “As in the past they are academically gifted, ready to engage our faculty in all areas. What is also important to us is the character and spirit that they bring to campus.“This class is full of students with many great gifts. I always like to remind them that Notre Dame is a place which will encourage them to develop and grow those gifts, but that the value of those gifts is not fully realized until they are shared with others — and they do that in so many ways.”“We are enrolling people who want to come to ND and develop a sense of purpose and have an impact during their life,” Bishop said.The Class of 2019 produced a yield rate of 56 percent, which measures how many students actually enrolled in the University after acceptance.“All by itself, that is a very high number, and among the best in the nation, but it also up from 53% last year,” Mundy said. “This reflects my staff’s great attention to identifying students who are good ‘fits’ for Notre Dame.”“I chose Notre Dame after a revelation,”Kevin Dingens, an incoming freshman, said.  The fact that Notre Dame touched me so deeply … is a testament to the extent of the University’s reach into the facets of your life past graduation. The first class athletic, social, and overall academic Notre Dame experience lasts beyond graduation to form an alumni community that is as strong as the student body itself. I want to be a part of that community.”Tags: Admissions, Bob Mundy, Class of 2019, Don Bishop, Notre Dame admissionslast_img read more

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Students embrace summer study abroad programs

first_imgChris Collins | The Observer The Italian town of Vernazza, located along the Cinque Terre hiking trail, is one of many places visited by Notre Dame students studying abroad.“These programs expose students to a broad range of destinations and they open their minds,” Max said. “They come back knowing that they can navigate these places and be successful in them. The world is a big and complex place. It is also an amazing place. We want our students to see this and begin to understand this.”With 20 programs across 13 countries offered for the summer, Max said NDI opened multiple new programs over the past few years which allowed more students to study abroad in the summer. According to NDI’s website, last year 500 students participated in summer abroad programs as compared to only 313 in 2015.“Some [students] have not had an international experience and this may be their first and only experience while at Notre Dame,” Max said. “They know that study abroad is a tradition here and they want to participate. These programs allow them to be part of that tradition.”Summer programs range from one to eight weeks with differing costs per program. Only a select number of students are accepted to each location.“Summer programs are condensed and intense and students tell us that strong bonds are formed among students in these programs and with Notre Dame faculty who lead these programs and share this experience with students,” Max said.In addition to seeing the pope, junior Marisa Lenga spent five weeks visiting numerous museums and archaeological sites while studying migration and theology through NDI’s Summer Rome program.“Being Italian, it was an incredible experience to go to ‘the homeland’ and visit the country of my ancestors,” Lenga said. “I was able to live a completely different culture than in America. Through my study abroad experience, I gained a deeper appreciation for my own heritage and culture.”From climbing mountains, immersing himself in mud and jumping into freezing cold water to celebrate the Irish holiday of “Bloomsday,” junior Jordan Lazowski said he was fascinated by the way the non-tourist activities of the six-week Dublin program enabled him to see Irish culture in its “truest form.”“Not only was it doing everything in a different country,” Lazowski said. “It was the experience of meeting new people and forming new friendships while also being able to learn in a very unique setting and unique way. I walked away feeling like there are parts of Irish history I know better than American history and I’ve been studying American history all my life.”Although Lazowski said life in Ireland was very different from his experiences in the Midwest, he believes the program’s shortness taught him to appreciate every opportunity while also introducing him to different people.“I’ve come back and I have a new mindset of maintaining these friendships, continue to push myself to try new things and expand outside of my comfort zones,” Lazowski said. “The biggest thing for me was just learning that unless you’re open to trying things, you have no idea what you’re going to accomplish or what you really enjoy in life.”After studying abroad in Rome the summer before his freshman year and spending three weeks of this past summer in China through NDI’s China Business and Culture program, sophomore Brandon Hardy said he hopes to travel to a different continent every summer of his college career.“I really want to take advantage and see how the world is because when I was growing up I didn’t travel at all,” Hardy said. “My family didn’t travel, they’ve never been outside of the country, they’ve never even been to most states so it was important for me when I got to college to take the time to go abroad in the summer and unpack different cultures on different continents and also get some credit while doing it.”Hardy said he and 13 other students learned from various well-known companies in China, such as Goldman Sachs and Nielsen, and had free time to explore Hong Kong and Shanghai on their own while earning three credits through an “Intercultural Communication” course.“Going abroad does something to you because you get to see something different and it makes you more well-rounded,” Hardy said. “When else would you have an opportunity to do something that short and sweet, get credits, meet people and be on a vacation because you get to see everything else? Opportunities like this are once in a lifetime.”Tags: China, International, Ireland, Rome, study abroad This past summer, some students set their sights beyond the United States.Some turned to China, Israel or the United Kingdom. Others looked to Russia, Ireland or South Africa. A handful focused on France, Brazil or Italy.Despite the diverse range of locations, they all had something in common: all were part of Notre Dame International’s (NDI) summer study abroad programs.NDI’s summer study abroad programs are short-term international excursions allowing students to learn abroad during the summer. According to NDI’s Director of International Programs Rosemary Max, the summer programs introduce students to the world.last_img read more

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Oklahoma Eagle publisher James Goodwin remembers the Tulsa Race Massacre in anti-racism lecture series

first_imgCourtesy of Dory Mitros Durham Publisher of the Oklahoma Eagle and Notre Dame alum, James Goodwin speaks at the Klau Center’s weekly series “Building an Anti-Racist Vocabulary.”Time at Notre DameGoodwin’s 77-page senior thesis, for what was then called the General Program and is now the Program of Liberal Studies, focused on racial disparities in employment in Tulsa.In his thesis introduction, Goodwin quoted University president emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh, a member of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, who said “that no American can escape taking a stand on civil rights, that no American can really disengage themselves from this problem.”“To me, his words meant the same now as they did then,” Goodwin said. “One is either a racist or an anti-racist.”In the first chapter, he wrote about a cross burning almost 40 years prior, a few days after the Tulsa Massacre. Ku Klux Klan members surrounded the cross, feeling jubilant and victorious, Goodwin said.“I went on to say that Tulsans do not relish recollection of their ignoble past,” he said. “Whites do not, perhaps because of shame. Negros do not, because of the misery they were forced to endure.”“But of a necessity, the past must be recalled. For how else can we explain the flagrant inequities between white and negro citizens, which now, and in 1957, exist in Tulsa?” Goodwin said. “Except, that they be explained by the still smothering coals of the cross burnings 40 years ago.”Advocate in the communityGoodwin recalled his own family’s experiences during the massacre.“In 1921, my father never made it to his high-school prom. It was scheduled the same night of the massacre,” Goodwin said. “And when the massacre occurred, he and his father and mother and four siblings survived the massacre.”But The Tulsa Star, the city’s first Black-owned newspaper, did not survive.Goodwin’s paternal grandfather, who he referred to as Papa, had become the business manager for The Star earlier that year. Almost 15 years later, Goodwin’s own father purchased the Oklahoma Eagle, Goodwin said.By the time Goodwin’s paternal grandparents had moved to Oklahoma, “according to the Oklahoma Historical Society, our state territory suffered through six massacres,” Goodwin said. “Black newspapers in Oklahoma informed Black people, chronicling these atrocities.”When introducing Goodwin, Mitros Durham also mentioned his work as an attorney. She said Goodwin had successfully defended a Black speaker in a 1969 First Amendment case that reached the Supreme Court and had served as co-counsel in a 2003 suit that sought reparations for victims of the 1921 Tulsa Massacre.“Although I’m an advocate of the law, I’ve also been an advocate in the community,” Goodwin said. For 41 years, Goodwin has served as the publisher of the Oklahoma Eagle. “As with the law, the newspaper has provided the Black community with a continuous, challenging and undeterred voice to champion the issues that are important and critical toward an inclusive and equitable society,” he said. Keeping memory aliveWith countless untold stories of racial violence in the U.S., Mitros Durham asked, “How can we ensure that the Tulsa Massacre and other key episodes of racial violence become and remain part of our anti-racist vocabulary, part of our ongoing reckoning with our nation’s history?”Goodwin mentioned that the Tulsa Massacre is now being taught in the Tulsa public school system, and that “there will have to be a contingent effort to continue to do that.”In February, CNN reported that Oklahoma state officials had announced plans to incorporate the history of the Tulsa Race Massacre into the curriculum of schools statewide.“There is more scholarship to be had, more books that are being written about this horrific event,” Goodwin answered. “And I think the purpose of it is not to make people feel bad, but to know that racism has seriously affected this country and still afflicts it.”Goodwin then reflected on the power of storytelling in teaching racial justice.“We need to personalize. It will make people understand the human condition with some personal stories. And there are many, many personal stories that should be told and have yet to be told,” Goodwin said.Mitros Durham asked Goodwin about the purpose of the city’s recent excavations into a possible mass grave site for Blacks killed in the massacre. These efforts started in July, according to NPR.“Black lives do matter, even if they have been sacrificed,” he said. “It’s important to resurrect them, so that we can look reality in the face. It’s important to give dignity to those people who were not dignified by white folks back then.”Looking ahead“You have to have hope,” Goodwin told Mitros Durham, after she asked whether the current racial justice movement gives him reason for optimism.“I’m very hopeful. It’s not going to be done without a struggle. That’s why people like our newspaper and myself, there are thousands of us out there working in the vineyards against these evils. We must continue to struggle and never give up hope.”Goodwin expressed hope that the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Massacre will be a “time for celebration of diversity.”He referred webinar attendees to lectures by Cornel West, Michael Eric Dyson and Greg Robinson and to books by Robin DiAngelo, Scott Ellsworth, Darnella Davis, Hannibal B. Johnson, Tim Madigan and Randy Krehbiel, in order to “get a good understanding of this whole issue of racism in America.”“Hopefully, the more we talk about it, the more we analyze it, the better people will fight against it and understand the importance of being anti-racist,” Goodwin added.Goodwin’s lecture on Tulsa was part of the “Building an Anti-Racist Vocabulary” series that the Klau Center for Civil and Human Rights is hosting this semester. According to Mitros Durham, approximately 400 students and around 1,000 faculty, staff and alumni have registered for the series, and as many as 700 people have attended the virtual lectures.The series has already connected participants to Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Notre Dame graduate Nikole Hannah-Jones ‘98 and Archbishop Wilton Gregory of the Archdiocese of Washington, D.C. Videos of all lectures will be made available on the Klau Center’s website.“The overwhelming feeling that I get,” Mitros Durham told the Observer, “is that our student population wants to do better and wants to do the work necessary to do better…To me, the number one highlight is hearing from the students and hearing their earnestness and sincerity in really wanting to do this,” she said.Tags: Building an Anti-Racist Vocabulary, Klau Center for Civil and Human Rights, Tulsa Massacre As the centennial of the 1921 Tulsa Massacre approaches, James Goodwin emphasized the importance of recalling the past in the path to racial justice. A Notre Dame 1961 graduate, an attorney and the publisher of the Oklahoma Eagle — the only Black-owned newspaper in Tulsa, Okla. — Goodwin spoke to the University community in a webinar by the Klau Center for Civil and Human Rights Friday.“You may ask, ‘Why is Tulsa the subject of this seminar?’” Goodwin began. “It is a place where Black Americans suffered the biggest and the deadliest racist terrorist attack in U.S. history.”On June 1 and 2, 1921, mobs of white people murdered around 300 Black Tulsans, wounded hundreds and displaced thousands, according to recent reports Dory Mitros Durham, the seminar instructor and lecture moderator, cited.Goodwin shared a description of the night of the massacre, from an editorial published in the Oklahoma Eagle last year. “By 1921, although racially segregated, the people of [the] Greenwood [district of Tulsa] flourished against enormous odds,” he read.On Memorial Day weekend 1921, a white 17-year-old girl and elevator operator claimed Dick Rowland, a 19-year-old Black shoeshiner, had assaulted her. Rowland had initially entered the building to use a segregated bathroom.Inflammatory misinformation and rumors instigated white Tulsans to find Rowland at the jail where he was being held, with the intent to lynch him. A group of Black men showed up to defend Rowland, and after a scuffle ensued and shots were fired, the race massacre in the Greenwood district of Tulsa began.“Suddenly, in the ‘twilight’s last gleaming,’ came thousands of white terrorists pillaging and utterly destroying it,” Goodwin continued, reading from the Oklahoma Eagle. “Their guns slaughtered hundreds of innocents. There were ‘bombs bursting in air.’ By the ‘dawn’s early light’ could be seen the ‘red glare’ of the smoldering ruins of [Tulsa’s] thousands of homes and businesses.”This year, Tulsa has been the focus of national attention as efforts to remember the city’s racial history and to raise awareness of the massacre have been intensified by political figures.Former Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg visited the city in January and proposed a plan that would include a “$70 billion investment in the nation’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods,” local television station KTUL reported.President Donald Trump also brought attention to Tulsa when he announced he would hold a rally there June 19, a holiday also known as Juneteenth. Many celebrate Juneteenth as the day when news of freedom reached Black enslaved people in Texas in 1865, more than two years after President Abraham Lincoln had signed the Emancipation Proclamation.The Washington Post reported many historians had been shocked by what they called the “insulting” and “outrageous” decision to hold a rally both an important date and an important place for U.S. racial history. Following the outrage, Trump decided to change the date of the rally to June 20.last_img read more

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Weekend Poll Top Three: Fans Are Rooting For Hunky Leading Men at the Tonys

first_img 3. Neil Patrick Harris—7% Speaking of physical transformations…The Emmy winner appeared on Broadway in Assassins, Proof and Cabaret before his legen—wait for it—dary stint on How I Met Your Mother, and returns to the Great White Way in the acclaimed revival of Hedwig and the Angry Inch, rocking kickass heels and lots and lots of wigs. Just an observation, NPH: you’re trailing behind two Broadway.com vloggers. Just let us know if you want in. Neil Patrick Harris View Comments Ramin Karimloo Andy Karlcenter_img Star Files 2. Andy Karl—39% Karl has been a Broadway favorite for years, but celebrates his first Tony nod for his leading turn as the Italian Stallion himself in Rocky. When he’s not going head-to-head with our poll’s front-runner, Karl can be caught downing raw eggs, sparring with raw meat and climbing those iconic steps at the Winter Garden Theatre. After his extreme physical transformation, Karl is one fighter you should look out for on Sunday. Well, if our super scientific polling numbers are any indication, one category in particular is going to be a close call on Sunday (yes, we’re officially less than a week away from the Tony Awards)! This weekend, we asked you which first-time Tony nominee you were rooting for. We included representatives from all eight performance categories, but Best Actor in a Musical proved to be a hot topic. From an international New York newbie and a slugging Broadway vet to a lovable TV superstar, here’s who you voted for! 1. Ramin Karimloo—43% Karimloo may be making his Broadway debut in Les Miserables, but this shirtless Jean Valjean has a major fan following, whether he’s belting out an iconic musical theater score or crooning bluegrass. And if you aren’t done swooning, check out his Broadway.com series, Vlogger 24601, where Karimloo dons a creepy mask, leads a gospel singalong and admits to being boring. We respectfully disagree with that last one.last_img read more

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U.K. Will Air Live Sound of Music Broadcast

first_img Now, who’s the British equivalent of Carrie Underwood? ITV is reportedly eyeing Buckinghamshire’s Pinewood Studios and Elstree Studios in Hertfordshire as possible shooting locations. The broadcast will potentially feature a live orchestra as well. The Sound of Music debuted on Broadway in 1959, starring Mary Martin as Maria, a young woman who leaves an Austrian convent to become a governess to the seven children of a naval officer widower. NBC’s live broadcast aired originally on December 5, 2013 and starred Grammy winner Carrie Underwood, who was joined by True Blood’s Stephen Moyer and Tony winners Audra McDonald, Laura Benanti and Christian Borle. The hills are alive in the U.K.! After landing mega-ratings on NBC, The Sound of Music will cross the pond for another live TV broadcast. Sources have confirmed to Broadway.com that the rumors reported by The Sun that ITV will air a live presentation of the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic are true. British audiences can expect to see Maria sing/yodel her heart out on the small screen sometime next spring.center_img The tuner received its London premiere in 1961 and has been revived in the West End twice. The most recent production, which opened at the London Palladium in 2006, starred Connie Fisher as Maria. Fisher won the role on the reality competition show How Do You Solve a Problem Like Maria?. View Commentslast_img read more

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Spring Awakening Stars & More Team Up For Lauren Pritchard’s 54 Below Debut

first_img View Comments Back in 2006, 18-year-old Lauren Pritchard made her Broadway debut as the free-spirited Ilse in Spring Awakening—now she’s all grown up, making her 54 Below debut! Pritchard welcomed fellow Spring Awakening friends Lilli Cooper (currently appearing in Wicked as the standby for Elphaba), Remy Zaken, Phoebe Strole, Brian Charles Johnson and Alice Lee onstage to sing a special medley from the Tony-winning musical, then invited Hair alum Kacie Sheik (bottom left, sister of Spring Awakening composer Duncan Sheik) and Chicago favorite Amy Spanger (bottom right) on stage to sing a few tunes. Congratulations, Lauren!last_img read more

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Sting’s The Last Ship Begins Performances on Broadway

first_imgNew musical The Last Ship, featuring an original score by Grammy winner Sting, sets sail and begins performances on Broadway on September 29. West End star Rachel Tucker and Broadway faves Michael Esper and Aaron Lazar star in the tuner under the direction of Joe Mantello. Opening night is set for October 26 at the Neil Simon Theatre. Featuring a book by John Logan and Brian Yorkey, The Last Ship is inspired by Sting’s own childhood experiences and his album of the same name. It is set in an English seafaring town that operates around the local shipyard and follows Gideon Fletcher, a man who left home to see the world and returns fourteen years later to find that the future of the shipyard is in danger. The shipyard’s workers decide to take their fate into their own hands and build a towering representation of the shared dream that has defined their existence. In addition to Esper, Lazar and Tucker, The Last Ship stars Jimmy Nail, Fred Applegate, Sally Ann Triplett and Collin Kelly-Sordelet. The production features sets and costumes by David Zinn, lighting design by Christopher Akerlind and sound design by Brian Ronan. View Comments The Last Ship Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 24, 2015last_img read more

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Broadway.com Culturalist Challenge: Who Should Play Elphaba in Wicked?

first_img Wicked The whole Broadway.com staff can’t get enough of Culturalist, the awesome website that lets you rank and create your own top ten lists. In fact, we love it so much, we’ve decided to partner with them! Every week, we’re bringing you a new Broadway-themed topic for you to rank on Culturalist.com. We’ll announce the ten most popular choices on the new episode of The Broadway.com Show every Wednesday! Related Shows Last week, Hedwig took the top spot for the best new Broadway-themed Halloween costume of 2014. This week, we want you to think green in honor of Wicked’s 11th Broadway anniversary! There’s a whole bunch of great stage and screen stars who have never played Elphaba—and we want to change that. So we want to know: Which actresses would you like to see go green in Oz? To start us off, Broadway.com news writer Ryan McPhee posted his list of dream Elphabas here! from $95.00 STEP 3 — PREVIEW: You will now see your complete top ten list. If you like it, click the “publish” button. (If you don’t have a Culturalist account yet, you will be asked to create one or sign in with Facebook at this point.) Pick your favorites, then tune in for the results on the November 5 episode of The Broadway.com Show. STEP 1 — SELECT: Visit Culturalist to see all of your options. Highlight your ten favorites and click the “continue” button. View Comments STEP 2 — RANK: Reorder your ten choices by dragging them into the correct spot on your list. Click the “continue” button. Once your list is published, you can see the overall rankings of everyone on the aggregate list.last_img read more

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Jason Robert Brown & Kathleen Marshall Team Up for My Paris at Goodspeed

first_img Paris seems to be all over the U.S. theater map this season; coming to Broadway this spring are the musicals Gigi and An American in Paris, with Can-Can having recently played New Jersey’s Paper Mill Playhouse and N—The Queen of Paris reportedly set to hit the Great White Way in March 2016 following engagements in Toronto and Chicago. My Paris is set to run through August 16. The 2015 season at the Norma Terris Theatre will also feature The Theory of Relativity, featuring a score by Neil Bartran and a book and direction by Brian Hill, from May 7 through 31. Indian Joe, featuring a score by Once Tony nominee Elizabeth A. Davis and a book by Davis and Christine Henry, will run from October 22 through November 15 under the direction of Kim Weild. The new musical will follow the life of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, a nineteenth-century French painter who captured the spark of Montmarte, Le Can-Can and Le Moulin Rouge. Making appearances in the show are the characters that have been immortalized in his works. A version of Toulouse-Lautrec was portrayed in the 2001 film Moulin Rouge by John Leguizamo. Paris is so in this season! My Paris, a new musical featuring English lyrics and arrangements by Tony winner and Honeymoon in Vegas composer Jason Robert Brown, will premiere at the Goodspeed’s Norma Terris Theatre this summer. The tuner features music lyrics by French composer Charles Aznavour and a book by Tony and Pulitzer Prize winner Alfred Uhry (who collaborated with Brown on Parade). Performances will begin at the famed Connecticut venue on July 23. Tony winner Kathleen Marshall will direct and choreograph. View Commentslast_img read more

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Anne Hathaway Begins Previews in Grounded Off-Broadway

first_img Related Shows View Comments Grounded Les Miz Oscar winner Anne Hathaway returns to the New York stage in George Brant’s Grounded on April 7. Directed by Tony winner Julie Taymor, the Public Theater production will officially open on April 26 at off-Broadway’s Anspacher Theater.Grounded is about the complicated consequences of waging war without leaving home. The play follows an ace fighter pilot reassigned to a remote-controlled drone, who faces twelve-hour shifts hunting targets from her Air Force trailer, followed by twelve in the suburbs with her family.Grounded is scheduled to run through May 17. Show Closed This production ended its run on May 24, 2015last_img read more

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Oliver Savile, Sean Kearns & More Are West End Wicked’s New Ozians

first_imgThe West End production of Wicked is about to welcome a bunch of new, swankified faces! Beginning September 21, Oliver Savile will join the cast as Fiyero, as will Sean Kearns as Doctor Dillamond, and current ensemble member Daniel Hope as Boq. The show continues to play London’s Apollo Victoria Theatre.Emma Hatton and Savannah Stevenson, the show’s current Elphaba and Glinda, have extended their contracts into 2016. Also continuing with the show are Liza Sadovy as Madame Morrible and Katie Rowley Jones as Nessarose. Wicked alum Carina Gillespie will join the production as the Glinda standby on September 21, joining Elphaba standby Natalie Andreou.Jeremy Taylor, Martyn Ellis and Sam Lupton will play their final performances as Fiyero, the Wizard and Boq, respectively, on September 19. Phillip Childs ends his run as Doctor Dillamond on August 8, and Steven Pinder will take over temporarily.Savile has appeared in the West End in The Phantom of the Opera and Les Miserables. Kearns’ stage credits include The Commitments, The 39 Steps and Billy Elliot. View Commentslast_img read more

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Joey Calveri, David Elder & More Will Take The Trip of Love Off-Broadway

first_imgAre you ready to revisit the summer of love? Broadway alums Joey Calveri, David Elder and more have been tapped for the previously reported The Trip of Love. Created, directed and choreographed by James Walski, the new dance musical spectacle will begin previews on September 26 at Stage 42, formerly The Little Shubert Theater. Opening night is set for October 18.Along with Calveri (Rock of Ages) and Elder (Curtains), the production will star Kelly Felthous (Flashdance), Dionne Figgins (Motown), Austin Miller (Grease: You’re The One That I Want), Katie Webber (Honeymoon In Vegas) and Laurie Wells (Mamma Mia!).Trip of Love brings the ‘60’s to life with over 25 of the decade’s biggest hits including “Blowin’ In The Wind,” “Born To Be Wild,” “California Dreamin’,” “I Saw Her Standing There,” “These Boots Are Made For Walkin’,” “White Rabbit,” “You Don’t Own Me” and many more.Rounding out the company will be Yesenia Ayala, Colin Bradbury, Bo Broadwell, Kyle Brown, Whitney Cooper, Alexa De Barr, Daniel Lynn Evans, Lisa Finegold, Steve Geary, Daryl Getman, Jennifer Gruener, Brandon Leffler, Peter Nelson, Tara Palsha, Kristin Piro and Nicky Venditti.The production will feature scenic design by Robin Wagner and costume design by Gregg Barnes. View Comments Trip of Love Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 7, 2016last_img read more

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Broadway’s On the Town Sets Final Performance Date

first_img Related Shows View Comments Twenty-four hours can go so fast. After struggling with low grosses for some time and receiving four 2015 Tony nominations but no awards on the big night, the Broadway revival of On the Town will play its final performance on September 6, the date incoming star Misty Copeland departs the production. At time of closing, the musical, which began performances on September 20, 2014, will have played 28 previews and 368 regular performances at the Lyric Theatre.First seen on Broadway in 1944, On the Town features music by Leonard Bernstein and a book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green. It follows the adventures of three sailors on leave in New York City. Based on the ballet Fancy Free by Jerome Robbins, the musical’s toe-tapping numbers include “New York, New York,” “I Can Cook Too,” “Lonely Town” and “Some Other Time.”Directed by John Rando, the show stars Tony Yazbeck as Gabey, Jay Armstrong Johnson as Chip, Clyde Alves as Ozzie, Alysha Umphress as Hildy, Megan Fairchild as Ivy Smith, Elizabeth Stanley as Claire, Jackie Hoffman as Madame Dilly, Michael Rupert as Judge Pitkin and Allison Guinn as Lucy Schmeeler. New York City Ballet soloist Georgina Pazcoguin will step into Fairchild’s ballet shoes on August 11 and will play the role of Ivy through August 23. Copeland is scheduled for a limited engagement from August 25.Broadway.com customers with tickets to canceled performances will be contacted with information on refunds or exchanges. On the Town Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 6, 2015last_img read more

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Thumbs Up! Annaleigh Ashford’s Lost in the Stars Brings Sparkle Back to Studio 54

first_img View Comments Sylvia star Annaleigh Ashford could blend right in in any decade, but with the recording of last year’s 54 Below act Lost in the Stars, now available through Broadway Records, she’s clearly an honorary child of the ‘70s. Ashford, who was a club kid herself in the ‘90s, seamlessly blends her fantastical aesthetic with an appreciation of the vibrant (and—as she’s quick to point out—drug-laden) history of the venue. The Tony winner’s first two numbers (“One Night Only” and a Donna Summer medley) immediately transport listeners to an era when the likes of Liza Minnelli, Elton John and Divine frequented the famed nightclub. The banter is equally captivating and unskippable; with her impeccable storytelling and music director Will Van Dyke’s incidental accompaniment, Ashford’s 12-minute anecdote of her childhood dance instructor Miss Kit Andrée is just as melodic and energetic as the most upbeat of numbers. While most of the set strays from Ashford’s theatrical canon, she does offer a few show tunes and songbook standards, including “For Good” and “Another Hundred People” (mashed with “Mona Lisas and Mad Hatters”).Check out a rehearsal music video from Ashford’s Lost in the Stars act below, and catch her at the midtown hotspot again this New Year’s Eve.last_img read more

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Ripcord Star Holland Taylor Discusses Her Relationship with a Woman

first_img Ripcord Star Files View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 6, 2015 Stage and screen favorite Holland Taylor currently stars in Ripcord off-Broadway, and in a recent interview with WNYC, the Emmy winner opened up playing an assisted living resident, losing her mother and learning to discuss her relationship with a younger woman.“The first weeks of rehearsal were very difficult because I was often very teary,” Taylor said; her mother spent her last few years in a setting not unlike the one in Ripcord. She explained that at the time of her mother’s death, she realized, “I was not very self-aware and I had not had wonderful relationships. I had not made them to be wonderful or let them be wonderful…I had stayed very solo. And I made a judgment about that, that that was impoverishing.”She is now in a relationship with a woman, and she calls it “the most wonderful, extraordinary thing that could have ever possibly happened in my life.”“I’ve been really wrestling with this lately,” admitted Taylor, “because most of my relationships have been with women, and I don’t like talking about them because I don’t like talking about the politics of it all, because I’m not political about it.” She added, “I’d like to be able to just say that, without having to stop and say, ‘So have you come out?’ No, I haven’t come out because I am out. I live out.”Taylor shared that she was currently dating a younger woman, and while she chose not to discuss her personally, she did say that the two have been candid with each other about the age gap. “I’m sure [it] shocks a lot of people, and it startles me. But you know…as they say, ‘If she dies, she dies.’”Taylor received a Tony nod in 2013 for her performance in the solo show Ann (which she also wrote). She won an Emmy for The Practice and earned four nominations for her role on Two and a Half Men. Her additional credits include Murder Among Friends and Butley on Broadway and Legally Blonde, The Lot and The L Word on screen.Ripcord, a Manhattan Theatre Club production, plays City Center Stage I through December 6. Taylor will reprise her role as Ann Richards in Ann in Austin, Texas next year. Holland Taylor Related Showslast_img read more

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Jimmy Fallon Joins Lin-Manuel Miranda for a Hamilton Sing-Along

first_img Lin-Manuel Miranda View Comments Star Files Related Shows Hamilton has crowned Jonathan Groff and Andrew Rannells—plus, Brian d’Arcy James off-Broadway—as King George, and a certain late night talk show host has a few ideas in mind for more. Hamilfan Jimmy Fallon joined Lin-Manuel Miranda for a digital edition of the #Ham4Ham show on January 20, and offered up his many impressions and vocal stylings on the trans-Atlantic heartbreak anthem “You’ll Be Back.” If you ever dreamcast Paul McCartney, Rufus Wainwright, Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, Bono or more in the megahit, your dream (sort of) came true. Catch Miranda, the real king Jonathan Groff and more at the Richard Rodgers Theatre. from $149.00 Hamiltonlast_img read more

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Cookin’ Up a Hit! See Songs from Waitress Starring Jessie Mueller

first_img Waitress Anyone who’s heard the Sara Bareilles album, What’s Inside: Songs from ‘Waitress’ are anticipating the new musical based on the hit indie film as much as anything else on Broadway’s horizon. Featuring a homespun story of a amateur pie maker stuck in a crappy marriage and her friends, the musical is led by Tony Award winning director Diane Paulus, stars Tony winner Jessie Mueller and features the sure-to-be loved stage songwriting debut of pop star Bareilles. At a press event on March 3, the cast previewed some of the show’s tunes. Enjoy!!Jessie Mueller as Jenna, Keala Settle as Becky and Kimiko Glenn sing “Soft Place to Land.” Mueller sings the breakout hit song “She Used to Be Mine.” Jenna hooks up with her gynecologist Dr. Pomatter (Drew Gehling) in “Bad Idea.” Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 5, 2020 Kimiko Glenn, Jessie Mueller & Keala Settle in ‘Waitress’ Related Showscenter_img Ogie (Christopher Fitzgerald) professes his love to Dawn (Glenn) with “I Love You Like a Table.” Jessie Mueller Star Files View Comments Sara Bareilleslast_img read more

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Get a First Look at Mark Rylance in The BFG Trailer

first_imgMark Rylance in ‘The BFG’ View Comments We have our first good glimpse at Mark Rylance’s return to the big screen this summer in a larger-than-life role (literally)! As previously reported, the three-time Tony and recent Academy Award-winner will lead Steven Spielberg’s adaptation of Roald Dahl’s classic children’s novel The BFG, and the trailer has arrived as delightfully unexpectedly as…well, a friendly giant in the middle of the night would! Check out the video below; Rylance will hopefully be seen back on the New York stage in Farinelli and the King this fall. The BFG hits movie theaters on July 1.last_img read more

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Broadway.com Editors Pick the Top Five Broadway Performances of 2016

first_img Broadway favorites dominated our best performances list this year, making us laugh, cry and want to learn to tap dance. Here are our top five performances of 2016.5. Audra McDonald in Shuffle Along, Or The Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That FollowedNumber five is Audra McDonald as actress Lottie Gee in Shuffle Along. The six-time Tony winner was a knockout as the early 20th Century diva who became Broadway’s first black ingenue while falling in love with her show’s married composer. Whether she was dazzling us with her comedic timing,  powerhouse voice or fantastic tap dancing, McDonald once again proved why she’s a walking, talking Broadway master class.4. Carmen Cusack in Bright StarAfter making a name for herself on the road, Carmen Cusack finally landed on Broadway this year, earning our number four slot for her raw and real starring role in the musical Bright Star. Cusack nailed the time-jumping part of a snappy Southern literary editor with a deep-buried secret, playing both the young, carefree youth and the emotionally-distant adult with equal conviction. And that voice! We can’t wait to see what’s next for this vibrant star.3. Nathan Lane in The Front PageWhen Tony winner Nathan Lane roars onto the stage as caustic tabloid editor Walter Burns in the shining revival of The Front Page, you know you are in the presence of a master. Spewing threats and insults, Lane lands every line and bit of shtick. Watching this Broadway pro at the height of his powers is pure joy.2. Christian Borle in FalsettosNumber two is two-time Tony winner Christian Borle, who this fall took a break from making us laugh to turn in yet another superb performance in Falsettos. His portrayal of his character Marvin’s struggle to create a tight knit family with his ex-wife, new boyfriend and son, is perfectly nuanced, delightfully neurotic and ultimately devastating. He is unlikely to be forgotten come Tony time.1. Ben Platt in Dear Evan HansenThe number one performance of the year is the phenomenal Dear Evan Hansen star Ben Platt. His performance as the lonely, anxiety-ridden teenager Evan in this stunning new musical is one for the Broadway history books. Platt’s brilliant transformation into an awkward high-schooler who becomes a viral sensation is a towering performance that left us blown away and wanting to witness the whole thing all over again. Clockwise from top left: Ben Platt, Nathan Lane, Audra McDonald, Ben Platt & Carmen Cusack View Commentslast_img read more

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Water Trees.

first_imgUnderstanding Water Important in a Drought Without water, a tree’s life begins to ebb away. Trees diefrom quiet exhaustion and starvation, not from a sudden, dramaticevent. And the prime cause of death for trees is the lack of water.Yet trees are actually surrounded by water. It’s in the soil,the air and even throughout their own wood. Water is everywhere,but much of it is unusable or unreachable.Water is where you find it, and you’ll find about 97 percentof all water on our planet in the oceans. Ocean water containsaround 35,000 parts per million (ppm) dissolved materials, comprisingat least 70 elements.Fresh Water, PleaseBecause of the dissolved elements, most trees can’t extracta drop from the ocean. Trees need fresh water.Fresh water, which has less than 1,000 ppm dissolved materials,makes up the remaining 3 percent of all the water on Earth. Ofthe 3 percent that’s considered fresh, two-thirds of it is snowand ice in glaciers and the polar ice caps.The final 1 percent of the fresh water can be found in theatmosphere, as ground water and as surface water in lakes andstreams.Earth is a wet planet. Liquid and solid water covers roughlythree-quarters its surface. But for all the expanse of water onor near the Earth’s surface, trees can use little.Across the landscape above sea level is a patchwork quilt ofrain forests and deserts, bottomlands and mountaintops. Limitedwater resources, in some form, are everywhere.The air abounds with water. Water vapor in the air is the humidityeveryone complains about. Large amounts of water vapor in theair slows water loss from trees and soils.In fog (100 percent relative humidity), trees lose no waterto the environment. Unfortunately, few of us live in a fog forest.Wind heated by pavements and dry ground surfaces reduce the humidityand increase landscape water loss. Water vapor is available tothe tree only when it’s condensed and absorbed.Feed RootsThe soil is filled with water. Water in the soil coats everyparticle and root tip. As the soil dries, more water evaporates.At some point, the soil becomes dry enough to prevent tree rootsfrom extracting any more water.The soil still has water held close around mineral and organicsoil units and in tiny pores between clay particles. But it holdsremaining water tighter than the trees can exert force to extractit.Water is found in greater abundance deeper in the soil. Butthis water is beyond trees’ reach. Tree roots can reach soil depthsof hundreds of feet if plenty of oxygen is available. But theyhave to have a lot of oxygen from the air to grow and survive.Tree roots stay shallow because they can’t get enough oxygen tolive in the deep, water-soaked soils.Like most things in life, it’s not how much you have, but howmuch is accessible, that allows survival. Under drought conditions,trees must deal with low soil moisture levels and still effectivelyextract water.Nature provides trees only a few tools to collect water. Thethirst a tree develops can be immense. Do your tree a favor, whenyou can, by watering. Water is a gift to trees beyond any silverand gold, pruning or fertilization.Water is life to a tree.(For more information on water, what it is and how it worksin trees, visit the University of Georgia School of Forest ResourcesWeb site at www.forestry.uga.edu/warnell/service/library.Click on “Service & Outreach,” then “InformationLibrary,” then “Drought Information.”)last_img read more

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Thaw safely

first_imgSponges – perfect home for bacteria”Keep in mind that sponges are very hard to disinfect, becausethey not only absorb and retain bacteria but also serve as aprotective environment where they can grow and survive for a longtime,” Doyle said. “Studies show that about 15 percent of kitchensponges contain bacteria like salmonella.”Many home cooks disinfect sponges by placing them in thedishwasher. To kill harmful bacteria, Doyle says a dishwasher’swater temperature should be at least 160 F.”You can disinfect kitchen sponges by placing them in themicrowave for a minute,” he said. “But make sure the sponge iswet or the sponge can catch on fire.”He recommends cleaning counters with a diluted bleach solutionand paper towels.Cutting boards can be hot spots for sharing bacteria, too. To besafe, Doyle says, designate one cutting board for fresh fruitsand vegetables and another for raw meats and poultry.Don’t forget to wash your hands often while cooking, he says,especially when handling raw meats and poultry. And use cleanutensils for each food item so you don’t cross-contaminate foods. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaIf this year’s holiday turkey is safely tucked away in the familyfreezer, remember to take it out in time for safe thawing.”When it comes to food safety, the biggest concern over theholidays is thawing the turkey properly,” said Michael Doyle, afood microbiologist with the University of Georgia College ofAgricultural and Environmental Sciences. “You’ve got to preplan,get it out and thaw it a few days ahead of time.”Doyle is the director of the UGA Center for Food Safety inGriffin, Ga. He’s a world-renowned expert in foodborne pathogens. Salmonella the main culpritA common cause of food illness from eating turkey and chicken, hesays, is salmonella. “Salmonella will grow very quickly at roomtemperature,” he said. “It grows on the outside first, whichmakes thawing outside the refrigerator dangerous. You can thawunder cold water in the sink.”If thawing in cold water, be sure to change the water every 20 to30 minutes.For safety sake, Doyle said, frozen turkeys are best thawedinside your home refrigerator, where it will remain cooler than40 degrees Fahrenheit. Keep in mind that this can take severaldays.Once your holiday bird is thawed and ready to prepare, handle theturkey carefully. Quickly clean up any turkey drippings fromcountertops.center_img Cook thoroughlyTo further ensure your holiday turkey is safe, it must bethoroughly cooked. To kill harmful bacteria, a whole turkeyshould be cooked until a food thermometer, placed in the thickestpart of the bird, registers 170-180 F, Doyle said.Once your holiday bird is ready to be served, remember to placeit on a clean serving platter.”A major cause of contamination is … placing well-cooked meatback on the platter that held the raw bird,” Doyle said. “Themeat juices and drippings often contain harmful bacteria andshould always be treated as if contaminated.”So how does the safety expert cook his holiday turkey?”I leave the cooking to my wife,” he said. “She’s an excellentcook.”last_img read more

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Fall Armyworms

first_imgEighty-one-year-old James Cobb finds mowing, raking and baling hay relaxing. Finding his fields infested with tiny armyworms has the opposite effect.‘‘I pulled up to my field, and it looked like someone had pulled a truck out of the field and left tracks on the road. They weren’t tracks. It was tons of those darned worms traveling up the road,’’ said Cobb, a small-scale farmer in Spalding County.Cobb had planned to cut his field once more this season. The worms had other plans.Almost every year in late summer, armyworms invade grass in home lawns and in hay fields and pastures across Georgia.‘‘They often cause severe damage in late summer or fall after migrating populations have increased during the season,’’ said Will Hudson, an entomologist with University of Georgia Extension. ‘‘In lawns, they usually just cause aesthetic damage. In pastures and hay fields, they reduce yields and even eliminate late cutting of hay. And, cows can’t eat what the worms already got.’’The caterpillars attack a wide range of plants, but prefer turfgrasses. They feed above the ground and mostly eat foliage and tender stems. ‘‘In severe cases, armyworms can cut grass down to ground level, leaving bare circular patches,’’ he said.Adult armyworm moths are active at night. Females lay eggs in masses of 50 to several hundred. Eggs hatch in a few days, and the young larvae begin to feed on leaf tissue. As the worms grow, they eat entire leaves.Caterpillars are most active late in the day and at night. They spend the hotter hours near the soil in the shade. Larvae feed for two to three weeks before pupating in the soil.Moths emerge 10 to 14 days later. The entire life cycle—-from egg to adult moth—-takes about 28 days in the warm weather of August and September. To test for armyworms, Hudson uses soap and water. ‘‘Mix a half ounce of dishwashing soap with a gallon of water and pour it on the grass. If the worms are present, they will quickly come to the surface,’’ he said.Pax Evans didn’t need soap and water to tell his lawn was infested. Evans lives next to a dairy farm where bermudagrass is grown for hay. The worms ate through the hay fields and traveled to Evans’ lawn.‘‘We went to bed one night and woke up the next morning to tons of worms all over the side of our house,’’ he said. ‘‘And, they had eaten the whole lawn down to just nubs of grass.’’Evans spent the weekend spraying Spectracide to control the pests. Hudson says controlling armyworms and other turf caterpillars is relatively simple once the problem is identified.‘‘The old standby carbaryl (Sevin) still works well, as do all the pyrethroids and products containing spinosad. Newer products like Acelepryn offer longer control, but at a price,” he said. Pyrethroids are the active ingredients listed on a label that end in ‘‘-thrin.’’No insecticide is really effective at controlling large caterpillars, so Hudson says target the worms while they are still small.“If the worms are detected while they are still small, Dipel, or other Bacillus thurengiensis(Bt)-based products, provide good control,” he said.Since armyworms are most active late in the day and at night, apply pesticides as late in the evening as possible. An application rate of 20 to 25 gallons of solution per acre as a minimum will ensure good coverage, Hudson said.With any insecticide, follow all label directions to minimize effects on bees and other pollinators. There is no need to water after applying pesticides and do not cut the grass for one to three days after application.Researchers in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are searching for armyworm resistance in zoysiagrass, a warm-season turfgrass that is growing in popularity.They fed armyworm larvae grass clippings from 46 zoysiagrass taxons. Twenty-two zoysiagrasses showed 20 percent or less survival rate.The next phase of the project will be testing whole plants in the greenhouse and fields.The scientists are also looking for varieties that are resistant to tropical sod webworms, tawny mole crickets, chinch bugs, two-lined spittle bugs and other turfgrass pests.‘‘Identifying and using resistant turfgrasses is an important component of integrated pest management as they reduce the need for pesticides,’’ Hudson said.For more information on controlling pests in turfgrass, go to www.GeorgiaTurf.com.last_img read more

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CVPS to buy Rochester electric

first_imgCVPSs newcustomers will also be covered by the companys SERVE Standards, a series of 17standards that measure everything from reliability to customer service, and arereported to state regulators.  SERVEstands for Serving Everyone with Reliability, Value and Excellence. Forward-Looking StatementsStatements contained in this report that are nothistorical fact are forward-looking statements intended to qualify for thesafe-harbors from the liability established by the Private SecuritiesLitigation Reform Act of 1995.  Statements made that are not historicalfacts are forward-looking and, accordingly, involve estimates, assumptions,risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results or outcomes to differmaterially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements.  Actualresults will depend, among other things, upon the actions of regulators,performance of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant, effects of and changesin weather and economic conditions, volatility in wholesale electric marketsand our ability to maintain our current credit ratings.  These and otherrisk factors are detailed in CV’s Securities and Exchange Commissionfilings.  CV cannot predict the outcome of any of these matters;accordingly, there can be no assurance that such indicated results will berealized. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on theseforward-looking statements that speak only as of the date of this pressrelease.  CV does not undertake any obligation to publicly release anyrevision to these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstancesafter the date of this press release. CVPS planspurchase of Rochester Electric Light & PowerRUTLAND CentralVermont Public Service will purchase the assets and franchise territory ofRochester Electric Light and Power under a deal announced today, which willreduce rates for the smaller companys customers, and allow CVPS to spread fixedcosts over a larger customer base. Young said thepurchase, though small, would help CVPS grow its customer base, a fact he saidwas important in a rural service territory that has seen very slow growth inrecent years. CVPS, founded in 1929, is Vermonts largest electric utility, serving about151,000 customers.   Rochester ElectricLight and Power was created in 1897, and serves approximately 900 customers. Weve trulyenjoyed providing service to our friends and neighbors, and were leaving themin capable hands, Pierce said. Pierce and hiswife Sandy plan to retire after the sale is completed, although CVPS isretaining Tom Pierce as a consultant to assist in the transition.  Rochester Electrics one employee, a lineman,will be offered a comparable position at CVPS. Rochester Electricowners, Tom and Sandy Pierce, have agreed to sell their utility property and Rochesters share of the Hydro-Quebec contract toCVPS.  If approved by the Vermont PublicService Board, the sale would reduce a typical Rochester customers yearly residential bill by 6.6percent.  The companies hope to close thesale around June 1 or shortly thereafter. Rochester Electricresidential and small commercial customers currently pay winter-summer rates,which average $72.84 per month for a residential customer using 500kilowatt-hours of energy.  As a CVPScustomer with the same usage, the bill would fall to $68.01 per month.  The winter-summer changes would beeliminated. The deals makesgood sense for Rochester Electric, CVPS, and the customers, Tom Pierce andCVPS President Bob Young said in a joint statement. CVPSs growth ispredicated in large part on investments in the core business, Young said.  Our territory grows very slowly, but thiscustomer base complements our territory, which surrounds it.last_img read more

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Ramp connecting I-89 South to I-91 North closed for repair Wednesday

first_imgThe Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) on Wednesday, May 12 will close the ramp connecting Interstate 89 South to Interstate 91 North. The ramp is being closed so that routine repairs can be conducted to a bridge that is part of the ramp. The closure, which will also affect how traffic from Route 4 accesses I-91 North, is expected to last three weeks.Motorists heading to I-91 North from either I-89 South or Route 4 East will be detoured along Route 4 East and eventually to Route 5 South where motorists will connect to I-91 North at Exit 11. Motorists are encouraged to leave extra time to reach their destination.The ramp closure will not affect traffic traveling south along I-89 seeking to connect to I-91 South.Source: VTrans. 5.11.2010last_img read more

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Green Mountain Coffee ranks #2 on Fortune’s global 100 fastest-growing companies

first_imgFor the second consecutive year, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (NASDAQ: GMCR), of Waterbury, Vermont, has been ranked on Fortune’s annual list of the 100 Fastest-Growing Companies. GMCR ranked #2 overall on the list released today.GMCR was the highest-ranked consumer package goods company on the list, which includes profitable, publicly-held companies with at least $50 million in annual revenue. Companies are assessed by revenue growth rate, EPS growth rate, and three-year annualized total return to investors. Last month, GMCR reported its 11th consecutive quarter of better than 40 percent net sales growth. For the first nine months of fiscal 2010, the company has produced net sales growth of 70% over the prior year and excluding acquisition-related expenses, earnings per share growth of 89% over the same period for fiscal year 2009.‘We are pleased that our continued strong sales and earnings growth has once again placed us in such good company on Fortune’s Fastest-Growing Companies list,’ said Lawrence J. Blanford, GMCR’s President and CEO. ‘We believe our strong performance is driven by our dedication to creating the ultimate coffee experience ‘ with the fresh-brewed convenience and quality of the Keurig single-cup brewing system and our premium, branded specialty coffees including Green Mountain Coffee and Tully’s Coffee.’About Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc.As a leader in the specialty coffee industry, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. is recognized for its award-winning coffees, innovative brewing technology, and socially responsible business practices. GMCR’s operations are managed through two business units. The Specialty Coffee business unit produces coffee, tea and hot cocoa from its family of brands, including Tully’s Coffee®, Green Mountain Coffee®, Newman’s Own® Organics coffee, Timothy’s World Coffee® and Diedrich, Coffee People and Gloria Jeans®, a trademark licensed to the Company for use in North America and owned by Gloria Jeans Coffees International Pty. Ltd. The Keurig business unit is a pioneer and leading manufacturer of gourmet single-cup brewing systems. K-Cup® portion packs for Keurig® Single-Cup Brewers are produced by a variety of roasters, including Green Mountain Coffee, Tully’s, Timothy’s and Diedrich. GMCR supports local and global communities by offsetting 100% of its direct greenhouse gas emissions, investing in Fair Trade Certifiedâ ¢ coffee, and donating at least five percent of its pre-tax profits to social and environmental projects. Visit www.gmcr.com(link is external) for more information.GMCR routinely posts information that may be of importance to investors in the Investor Relations section of its website, including news releases and its complete financial statements, as filed with the SEC. The Company encourages investors to consult this section of its website regularly for important information and news. Additionally, by subscribing to the Company’s automatic email news release delivery, individuals can receive news directly from GMCR as it is released.Source: GMCR, 8.19.2010. WATERBURY, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–last_img read more

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Green Mountain Electrical Inspectors support VTC electrical program

first_imgVermont Technical College,The Green Mountain Chapter of International Association of Electrical Inspectors (IAEI) has donated $1,000 in support of the Electrical Apprenticeship program offered through the Technology Extension Division at Vermont Technical College. The IAEI has been a strong supporter of both the program and college in the past, and annually awards prizes to the top students in the Electrical 1 and Electrical 4 programs. Historically, the prize for the top student in Electrical 1 has been a full tool kit assembled and donated by Klein Tools. The prize for the top student in the Electrical 4 program is a year’s membership in the IAEI, a certificate for a free 15-hour Code Update course worth more than $100, and a 2011 National Electric Code book. ‘The Green Mountain Chapter of the IAEI is a strong supporter of the Vermont Apprenticeship Program and we’re glad to help in any way we can,’ said Andrew Rea, Chapter President. The college will use this year’s donation to help pay for catering and other costs associated with the Apprenticeship graduation ceremony scheduled for April 9th. Randolph Center, VT, April 1 –last_img read more

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Eight Vermont counties now qualify for homeowners and business assistance

first_imgGovernor Peter Shumlin has announced that Addison, Orange and Bennington Counties have received the Individual Assistance Declaration, joining Windham, Chittenden, Washington, Rutland and Windsor. ‘This is critical for homeowners and businesses facing expensive damages and losses from Tropical Storm Irene,’ the Governor said. Assistance for losses sustained anytime after the storm may include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses and other programs to help recover from the effects of the disaster. Even those with insurance may be eligible for help from FEMA if their insurance policy does not cover all their needs, FEMA said. To apply: Step 1: Register with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. There are several ways to register:Apply online anytime at www.DisasterAssistance.gov(link is external). Call 800-621-FEMA (3362) or TTY at 800-462-7585. Those who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS) may call 800-621-3362. The toll-free telephone numbers operate from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week until further notice. Multilingual operators are available to assist with the application process.By smartphone or tablet, use m.fema.gov, or for devices with the Android operating system, a FEMA App can be downloaded at market.android.com/details?id=gov.fema.mobile.android.When applying for aid you will receive a nine-digit registration number that can be used for reference when corresponding with FEMA. It is helpful to have the following information handy:Current telephone number;Address at the time of the disaster and current address;Social Security number, if available;A general list of damages and losses;If insured, the name of insurance company, agent and policy number; andBank routing number for any direct deposit. Step 2: Receive a property inspection.Within a few days after registering, eligible applicants will be telephoned to make an appointment to have their damaged property inspected. The inspectors, who are FEMA contractors and carry identification badges, visit to make a record of damage. They do not make a determination regarding assistance. There is no cost for the inspection. Step 3: All applicants will receive a letter from FEMA regarding the status of their requests for federal assistance. Some will also receive an application for a low-interest disaster recovery loan from the U.S. Small Business Administration.Anyone who has questions about the letter from FEMA should call the helpline (800-621-3362 or TTY, 800-462-7585).Those who receive an application packet from the SBA should complete and submit the forms. No one is required to accept a loan but submitting the application may open the door to additional FEMA grants. FEMA sent out 35 field reps to counties that have received the Individual Assistance Declaration.  These reps have been handing out materials residents will need and have been answering one on one questions. The Governor outlined steps that his administration is taking in anticipation of more rainfall tonight and into tomorrow.  Emergency management officials are closely monitoring the weather and advising Vermonters to once again take precautions for the possibility of high water and power outages.Governor’s office. 9.6.2011last_img read more

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First new home set at Weston’s Mobile Home Park

first_imgThe mobile home de-construction team headed by Lt. Governor Phil Scott and Secretary of Commerce and Community Development Lawrence Miller gathered this morning at Weston’s Park in Berlin for the delivery of the first new mobile home since the flood.  Today’s delivery marks a significant step forward for the park, where 70 homes were substantially damaged by Irene. The team headed by Lt. Gov. Scott and Secretary Miller removed 30 of those homes over the past two weeks at no cost to the homeowners. By working with contractors, community organizers and state officials, the team substantially reduced the cost of removal by lining up several homes for on-site demolition in the same park at the same time. Individual mobile home disposal typically involves trucking the unit out of the park and, when done one at a time, can cost upwards of $3,500. Thanks to successful fundraising by the Vermont Community Foundation and the Vermont Long Term Disaster Recovery Group, the team was eventually able to offer the service completely free of charge to mobile home owners without spending any taxpayer dollars.   This morning, the team announced another major donor to the project. Bond Auto Parts stepped forward with a $50,000 contribution, which will help to fund the ongoing de-construction work in mobile home parks around the state. The team prepared to finish up work today at Patterson’s Mobile Home Park in Duxbury, where 15 mobile homes were removed. Next week, contractors will move on to Whalley’s in Waterbury, and then on to parks in Woodstock and Brattleboro. Residents Bob and Patty Goodell, owners of the new mobile home that was delivered to Weston’s this morning, said they were thrilled that they would be in their new home in time for Thanksgiving. “The last two and a half months have felt like two and a half years,” Patty Goodell said, “but we’re so grateful to park owner Ellery Packard and to Lt. Governor Scott and his team for making this happen.” “In our work so far, we’ve removed 45 homes and filled 100 dumpsters,” Scott said. “But the true measures of success here are the homeowners and the park owners who will have a clean slate and be able to move forward with their lives.”last_img read more

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Vermont EB-5 Regional Center recognized as best in the nation

first_imgThe Agency of Commerce and Community Development’s EB-5 Regional Center has again received the EB-5 Regional Center of the Year Award for the second year in row by the Artisan Business Group. The Artisan Business group is one of the largest EB-5 brokers in the world, dealing primarily with the Chinese investor marketplace. In giving the award, the Artisan group noted that as the only government-run regional center in the country, Vermont stands out with its strong governmental support, including direct involvement in the program from Gov. Peter Shumlin and Sen. Patrick Leahy. Artisan further states that Vermont’s intensive application process and oversight has led to stronger than average projects, creating a strong market brand for Vermont. The main focus of Vermont’s work in EB-5 is job creation. ‘These investments require job creation, so becoming the industry leader nationally not only provides significant investment capital for Vermont businesses, but also creates jobs for Vermonters,’ said Commerce and Community Development Secretary Lawrence Miller.The Vermont EB-5 Regional Center was created in 1998 and is managed by the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development. The federal program gives a green card benefit to investors who invest at least $500,000 in an approved project, and must personally show that that investment creates at least 10 direct and indirect jobs. Since 1998, more than $250 million has been invested in Vermont by EB-5 investors in companies such as Jay Peak Resort, Sugarbush Resort, Country Home Products, and Seldon Technologies.The year 2011 was an especially strong year for the Vermont Regional Center, with more than $100 million estimated to have been invested in Vermont projects alone. With almost 200 regional centers in the country, this constitutes almost 15 percent of all EB-5 investment nationally for the year, showing Vermont’s strong position in the marketplace.‘Without the EB-5 program, many of these projects would not have found the capital they needed for their expansions, and the hundreds of jobs tied to them would not have been created,’ said James Candido, the director of the EB-5 for the State of Vermont.Candido added that the way Vermont has structured its Regional Center is the biggest reason for its success, ‘EB-5 investors are looking for as much safety as possible in their at-risk investment. Since Vermont was one of the first EB-5 Regional Centers in the country, we have a solid understanding of EB-5 and a significant track record that benefits our projects and market perception,’ he said. ‘The award from the Artisan group is significant for both present and future Vermont EB-5 projects, since Artisan is one of the largest broker firms that pair Chinese investors to EB-5 projects. Roughly 50 percent of all EB-5 investment in 2011 was from Chinese nationals, so this is an important recognition.’12.28.2011last_img read more

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