Scalable wind turbine might fit on your roof

first_img Explore further When you think of wind power, you probably picture gigantic wind turbines spinning gracefully in the middle of large open areas. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Scalable wind turbine might fit on your roof (2008, May 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-05-scalable-turbine-roof.html But an entrepreneur from Fullerton, California, has invented a new wind turbine design that is smaller, scalable, and could potentially fit on the roofs of homes like a long satellite antenna. Rather than a single giant rotor with 50-foot-long blades, Doug Selsam´s “Sky Serpent” design uses several small rotors attached to a single shaft. By placing the rotors in precise positions and angles, each rotor can harvest its own wind, and avoid simply stealing the wake from the adjacent rotor. The entire turbine is hooked up to a single generator, which produces about the same amount of power as a turbine that uses 10 times as much blade material, Selsam says.The shaft that holds the rotors can vary in length, and use any number and size of rotors, depending on its application. The rotors can even be mounted on poles that are light enough to be hand-held or attached to the roof of a house. Using ten 18-inch rotors, for example, one Sky Serpent model can generate between 100 and 400 watts, depending on wind speed.Selsam has been working on the Sky Serpent design since 1999, with support from a $75,000 grant from the California Energy Commission. Working out of his garage and doing tests in a makeshift wind tunnel, he´s built a seven-rotor turbine that can generate 3,000 watts, as well as a dual-rotor turbine that generates 2,000 watts. He´s already sold 20 of the 2,000-watt devices to homeowners. Another 3,000-watt prototype uses 25 rotors, where the shaft is attached to the ground at one end and held in the sky by a balloon at the other. In another concept, the turbine can float near the surface of water, its shaft and propellers extended in the air over the open ocean.In the early ´80s, Selsam attended classes at but never graduated from the University of California at Irvine. However, his multi-rotor designs have received positive feedback from former General Electric turbine tester Brent Scheibel, who now runs a wind-testing facility in Tehachapi, California. “Doug´s idea is one of the very, very few that I´ve seen that actually has a strong chance of making strides into the commercial world,” Scheibel said in an interview with Popular Science.As the wind turbine industry grows by more than 40 percent per year, Selsam hopes that the simple Sky Serpent design will simplify the manufacturing, transportation, and installation compared with conventional turbines – as well as provide more energy and be less of an eyesore.via: Popular Science, Tech.Blorge.com, and SpeakerFactory.net (Left) Doug Selsam with a prototype 25-rotor turbine that can generate 3,000 watts, while the other end is held up by a balloon. Credit: Popular Science. (Right) Selsam holds a model with 14-inch rotors that can power the 50-watt headlight at his feet. Credit: SpeakerFactory.net. Three things to know as Germany opens massive ocean wind parklast_img read more

Researchers find some plants get their nitrogen from fungi that kill insects

first_img Citation: Researchers find some plants get their nitrogen from fungi that kill insects (2012, June 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-06-nitrogen-fungi-insects.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. After noting that a prior team of researchers had found that white pine trees got some of their nitrogen from fungus living in their roots that had obtained the nitrogen by killing springtails, the team wondered if perhaps many other plants did the same. To find out, they chose two random but common plants, haricot beans and switchgrass.First they fed waxmoth larve a diet rich in a non-common type of nitrogen; nitrogen-15, so as to be able to distinguish it from the nitrogen that would normally be found in the plants. Next they infected the soil near the roots of the plants with Metarhizium, a very common type of fungi that is known to kill insects by releasing an enzyme that eats its way through the outer shell allowing the bug inside to be easily devoured. Then, they buried the infected larvae in the soil among the plant roots, along with a mesh to prevent the roots of the plants from reaching past the infected soil to soil that had been enriched with nitrogen through normal bacterial decomposition.Two weeks later they tested the plants and found that the nitrogen in the beans was 28% nitrogen-15, and 32% in the switchgrass, proving that the plants had obtained at least some of their nitrogen from the fungi that had in turn got it from killing the enriched larvae. The chain was complete.Because they used both common plants and fungi, the team believes their results show that such nitrogen chains: insects-fungi-plants, are likely very common. They say more research is needed however, to determine if the chain they created in the lab is just as prevalent in the wild. © 2012 Phys.Org Explore further Journal information: Sciencecenter_img Fungi important in Arctic nitrogen cycle Cockroach killed by Metarhizium anisopliae. Image: Chengshu Wang and Yuxian Xia, via Wikipedia. (Phys.org) — We’ve all grown up with stories of plants that capture, kill and eat insects; the Venus fly trap the most notable example. Now it appears some plants get their nitrogen from insects via proxy. Instead of having to develop a complicated system of traps to catch insects on their own, they rely on fungi to do their dirty work for them. A team of Canadian researchers from Brock University, St. Catharine’s, has found that some plants, as they describe in their paper published in Science, grab nitrogen from fungi that live in its roots. The fungi get it from killing insects. In return for its generosity, the fungi get carbon. More information: Endophytic Insect-Parasitic Fungi Translocate Nitrogen Directly from Insects to Plants, Science 22 June 2012: Vol. 336 no. 6088 pp. 1576-1577 DOI: 10.1126/science.1222289ABSTRACTMost plants obtain nitrogen through nitrogen-fixing bacteria and microbial decomposition of plant and animal material. Many vascular plants are able to form close symbiotic associations with endophytic fungi. Metarhizium is a common plant endophyte found in a large number of ecosystems. This abundant soil fungus is also a pathogen to a large number of insects, which are a source of nitrogen. It is possible that the endophytic capability and insect pathogenicity of Metarhizium are coupled to provide an active method of nitrogen transfer to plant hosts via fungal mycelia. We used soil microcosms to test the ability of M. robertsii to translocate insect-derived nitrogen to plants. Insects were injected with 15N-labeled nitrogen, and we tracked the incorporation of 15N into amino acids in two plant species, haricot bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), in the presence of M. robertsii. These findings are evidence that active nitrogen acquisition by plants in this tripartite interaction may play a larger role in soil nitrogen cycling than previously thought.last_img read more

Team reports braincontrolled ambulation in robotic leg test

first_img More information: Brain-Computer Interface Controlled Robotic Gait Orthosis: A Case Report, arXiv:1208.5024v1 [cs.HC], arxiv.org/abs/1208.5024v1AbstractAn able-bodied subject used walking motor imagery to accurately operate a non-invasive brain-computer interface (BCI) controlled robotic gait orthosis. This finding represents the first successful demonstration of a BCI-controlled lower extremity prosthesis for independent ambulation, with significant implications for restoring ambulation to individuals with spinal cord injury paraplegia. (Phys.org)—Spinal cord injury victims may be able to look forward to life beyond a wheelchair via a robotic leg prosthesis controlled by brain waves. Individuals with paraplegia due to spinal cord injury who are wheelchair-bound face serious health problems, or in medical terminology, comorbidities, such as metabolic derangement, heart disease, osteoporosis, and pressure ulcers. New research efforts are being directed toward restoring brain-controlled ambulation for those who suffer from spinal cord injuries. Citation: Team reports brain-controlled ambulation in robotic leg test (2012, September 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-09-team-brain-controlled-ambulation-robotic-leg.html In previous work, they developed a way of using EEG signals to control the walking motion of an avatar in a virtual environment.Their tests involved recording EEG data from an able-bodied subject alternating between walking and standing. The data was used to generate an EEG prediction model for online BCI operation. A commercial robotic gait orthosis system was interfaced with the BCI computer to allow for computerized control. In an online test, the subject was tasked to ambulate using the system when prompted by computerized cues. The researchers assessed how the system performed with cross-correlation analysis, latency, and omission and false alarm rates.The latter, “false alarm rates” was of great concern as unintended steps in realtime could be deadly for a user, such as trying to cross the street or waiting for a train. They found that the system did not result in any unintended steps, or “false alarms.” Still in its early stage, their research needs to turn another corner as they must test the system on a subject with spinal cord injury.At this stage, their efforts are regarded as important first steps toward future devices to restore walking to individuals with paraplegia due to spinal cord injury, and possibly for rehabilitation of those with incomplete motor injuries. Do and colleagues state that “these results provide preliminary evidence that restoring brain-controlled ambulation may be possible. However, future work is necessary to test this system in individuals with paraplegia due to SCI.”Their project was funded by the Long Beach Veterans Affairs Southern California Institute for Research and Education (SCIRE) Small Projects Grant, and the Long Beach Veterans Affairs Advanced Research Fellowship Grant. Spinal cord processes information just like areas of the brain Explore furthercenter_img Left: The experimental setup showing the subject suspended in the RoGO, while donning an EEG cap, surface EMG electrodes, and a gyroscope on the left leg. A monitor (not shown), placed in front of the subject at eye-level, presented instructional cues. Top Right: The CPCA-AIDA feature extraction maps at the 8-10 Hz bin. Since feature extraction is piecewise linear, there is one map for each of the 2 classes. Brain areas with values close to +1 or -1 are most salient for distinguishing between idling and walking classes at this frequency. Bottom Right: Histogram of averaged posterior probabilities. Credit: arXiv:1208.5024v1 [cs.HC], http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5024v1 © 2012 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. An Do, MD, at the Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center in California and colleagues at the University of California Irvine, have succeeded in connecting a mind-computer interface to a robotic leg. “This finding represents the first successful demonstration of a BCI-controlled lower extremity prosthesis for independent ambulation,” say the researchers. They built and tested a prosthetic lower limb that can be controlled in real time by EEG (electroencephalogram) signals fed into a computer.Their work is presented in a paper, “Brain-Computer Interface Controlled Robotic Gait Orthosis: A Case Report,” by An H. Do, Po T. Wang, Christine E. King, Sophia N. Chun, and Zoran Nenadic. last_img read more

Is that a smartwatch youre not wearing Googles may actually appear

first_img Citation: “Is that a smartwatch you’re not wearing?” Google’s may actually appear (2013, March 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-smartwatch-youre-google.html Google has designs on flip-up wristwatch Want to play smartwatch? That’s the game where you pretend to buy a big-vendor smartwatch that doesn’t exist but everyone talks about nonetheless. There is the Samsung smartwatch rumor mill, the Apple smartwatch rumor mill, and, as of this week, a burning-up Google rumor mill. The Google talk was sparked by Financial Times blogger, Tim Bradshaw, this week. In his blog titled “Google is working on a smartwatch, too” he said according to “a person briefed on the project” that Google’s smart watch is being developed by its Android unit, and the watch will “act as an extension to the smartphones using that operating system.” Explore further There is no word of a date when it might launch but there are clues that Bradshaw might be writing about more than extra ingredients for the Samsung-Apple-Google rumor mill. Since the project is attributed to the Android unit and not the X Lab, the project might be earmarked for launch rather than multi-phased explorations that may or may not surface any time soon. The Google X Lab hatches technologies for the future such as the much-publicized self-driving cars and glasses. Another clue lies in the date October 2011, when Google filed a patent for a “Smart-watch including flip up display.” The filing described a smart-watch that can include a wristband, a base, a flip up portion, and a camera. The patent described the camera as one that can be in communication with the processor and the flip up portion can form a viewfinder for the camera when in the open position and be configured to display information regarding an image within the viewfinder.A popular view about a likely Google smartwatch is that wearable computing in and of itself is considered as an inevitable sign of the future, which makes the watch undertaking all the more plausible. Moving information away from the confines of desks and PC screens, the mobile computing labs outside Google are busy tinkering with wearable devices that operate in the physical world. While talking sneakers and Google glass already grab attention as what-ifs, they might be less amenable to immediate and easy uptake than would wearable watches. Should Samsung and Apple rush out smartwatches, Google would be left in the dust. As the Financial Times blog noted, smart watches, whether by Apple, Samsung, or Google, would jumpstart the wearables market. © 2013 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

USB sticks may beat Internet hurdles globally

first_img More information: Spreading huge free software without internet connection, via self-replicating USB keys, arXiv:1311.6754 [cs.OH] arxiv.org/abs/1311.6754AbstractWe describe and discuss an affordable way to spread huge software without relying on internet connection, via the use of self-replicating live USB keys. Intel Unveils Extensible Host Controller Interface Draft Specification to Support USB 3.0 Architecture Unfortunately, he wrote, the cost of bandwidth is expensive relative to the local income in countries and, even beyond cost, the available bandwidth does not allow huge downloads. “The network consideration “seems to be an important bottleneck in spreading free software where bandwidth is a rare commodity,” he stated.What the author has in mind instead is a self-replicating USB thumbdrive. The script will let a bootable USB stick replicate itself onto another stick, and at rates that can top the users’ Internet connections.MIT Technology Review noted how the concept involves a self-replicating bootable USB stick that holds an operating system and any software that needs to run on it. The stick can copy its contents to another USB stick. That way, users in underserved parts of the globe can get their hands on information they need more easily. Monteil wrote a script that clones the contents of one USB stick to another. To test the idea, Monteil used the script to transfer Sage, with an installation of Debian. Sage (stands for Software for Algebra and Geometry Experimentation) is a free mathematics software system licensed under the GPL The use of USB sticks for transferring information, nonetheless, carries a risk where someone could inject malware as part of the cloning events. “While being very efficient for our purpose of spreading huge free software inside a community, it is definitely not advisable for spreading sensitive software, or for large-scale distribution,” he wrote. Monteil also observed how “This communication-via-replication protocol currently relies on trust, and should be only used “for short distance communication…or among “a small structured community.” Citation: USB sticks may beat Internet hurdles globally (2013, December 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-12-usb-internet-hurdles-globally.html (Phys.org) —One may think that free software would be of enormous benefit to people in the towns and villages of the globe where the price of proprietary software is restrictively high. Such is not the case, as noted by Thierry Monteil of the University of Montpellier 2 in France. While the software is free to download, the cost of bandwidth is not. What is more, important but large software packages that enable technology students and workers to carry out their projects may take very long times to download, and may regularly be at the mercy of unreliable Internet connections. Monteil has authored a paper available on arXiv, which presents what may be a cheaper and easier way to transmit large software packages. He has written the paper, “Spreading Huge Free Software without Internet Connection via Self-Replicating USB Keys.” The paper describes his concept and how he tested it out. In short, one can use self-replicating USB keys without having to rely on a hard-to-afford and time-draining Internet connection. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further World map of IPv4 addresses. Credit: arXiv:1311.6754 [cs.OH] © 2013 Phys.orglast_img read more

Hackers begone Measurementdeviceindependent QKD increases clock rate and transmission distance while reducing

first_img Recently, however, scientists at the University of Science and Technology of China devised a de novo MDIQKD protocol and have developed a 75 MHz clock rate, fully automatic and highly stable system and superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors with detection efficiencies of more than 40%. By so doing, they have extended MDIQKD secure transmission distance to 200 km, and achieving a secure key rate three orders of magnitude higher – and an failure probability six orders of magnitude lower – than those of previous MDIQKD attempts. The researchers state that their results pave the way towards a quantum network with measurement-device-independent security, and in fact have already demonstrate the feasibility of MDIQKD in an unstable environment by performing a field test in which their system was inserted into an installed fiber network.Prof. Qiang Zhang discussed the three key accomplishments detailed in the paper that he, co-group lead Prof. Jian-Wei Pan, Researcher Yan-Lin Tang, and their co-authors published in Physical Review Letters. “Each of our main accomplishments – increasing system clock rate to 75 MHz and improving system stability, extending secure transmission distance to 200 km, and lowering failure probability by six orders of magnitude to 2 × 10−9 – had its unique challenges,” Zhang tells Phys.org. “In terms of performance, this is the first time we’ve increased clock rate to 75 MHz, as well as improving system stability and using high efficiency – over 40% – superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors to develop a fully automatic system, in an MDIQKD approach.” Zhang points out that while a gigahertz clock rate in conventional QKD is easily achieved, this is not the case with MDIQKD. Specifically, unlike conventional QKD, MDIQKD relies on interference between two independent lasers – and increasing the clock rate to 75 MHz caused poor two-laser interference visibility. “The main challenge lies in high-speed laser modulation, including not only severe overshoot, ringing and chirp inside the laser pulse, but also a more subtle problem lying in the temperature fluctuation caused by random triggering signals to the internally-modulated laser source,” Zhang explains. “These effects are observed for the first time simply because interference of two independent high clock-rate lasers could not be discovered in a low-speed system.” Regarding detector efficiency (DE), Zhang notes that superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) have been demonstrated as a key tool for improving the QKD performance – but the challenge is to improve nanowire absorption. The scientists have addressed this issue by integrating an optical cavity structure in the detectors: SNSPDs are cooled down to 2.2 K by using a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler to guarantee high detector performance as well as 7´24 hour operation†. “Again,” he stresses, “this is the first time high detector efficiency superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors have been applied in an MDIQKD system.”Extending the MDIQKD secure transmission distance to 200 km and achieving a secure key rate three orders of magnitude higher than previous results in recent MDIQKD experiments challenged the researchers in several aspects. “First was the signal-to-noise ratio,” Zhang notes. “Because of the long distance, the signal arriving at the receiver’s side will be very weak. “Secondly, system stability in a 200 km case is difficult since the fiber fluctuation is much severe, and a large attenuation will make it even harder with weak feedback signals. Thirdly, we required a better and stricter post-processing method to handle the greater distance results in a slower raw data rate and a stronger fluctuation.”Finally, to guarantee the safe usage of the secure key in practice, the failure probability must be controlled beneath the order of 10-9 – and the 2 × 10−9 failure probability they achieved is six orders of magnitude lower than previous results. The main reason that previous demonstrations used a higher failure probability of 10−3, Zhang tells Phys.org, is that performing fluctuation analysis with a lower failure probability requires more data to be accumulated. However, this requirement could not be satisfied by the actual experimental systems operated at a slow system clock rate and without full automatic feedback system – especially in the 200 km case when signal attenuation is very large – so the arriving signal is weak.Addressing these challenges was, in itself, a challenge. “For the current experiment,” Zhang continues, “the first challenge was to increase the system clock rate to 75MHz with good laser modulation. To ensure a good waveform, we modulated the laser pulse with an amplitude modulator cutting off the tail, thereby eliminating the influence of the chirp, overshoot and ringing. To ensure robust two-laser interference, we modulated vacuum intensity – instead of not providing the triggering signal – to avoid the effect of temperature fluctuation.” For a long distance QKD experiment, a single-photon detector with high detection efficiency and low dark count rate (the average rate of registered counts without any incident light) is decisive. “A conventional semiconducting APD (avalanched photodiode) cannot fulfill this requirement because of its high dark count rate and low detection efficiency, which is why a superconducting nanowire single-photon detector – specifically, a cryocooler-based SNSPD technology providing over 40% detection efficiency at the dark count rate of 10 Hz – is the sole choice for 200 km MDIQKD.” (In QKD protocols, an ideal single photon source rarely exists, and so is replaced by a weak coherent state laser source or other alternative. This causes a serious security problem that is minimized by using a weak laser source – but the latter results in low QKD speed. Decoy state QKD uses several different photon intensities rather than a single intensity to resolve the multi-photon issue. Moreover, the scientists optimized the decoy state MDIQKD protocol, including the decoy state scheme, intensity and probability distribution.”Secondly,” Zhang continues, “we adopted the high efficiency, low dark count superconducting nanowire single-photon detector to achieve the 200 km distance. Last but not least, to make the entire system stable for a long period of time, we developed several feedback systems to precisely calibrate the parameters of the system, such as a wavelength calibration system employing an optical spectrum analyzer with 1 pm precision.” This is critical because extended system stability enables continuous running for as long as an entire week.The much lower failure probability of 10-9 requires not only an experimental setting capable of accumulating enough raw data, but also a more appropriate post-processing method to extract the secure key. “With this work, for the first time in the entire OKD community we adopt the Chernoff bound (which gives exponentially decreasing bounds on tail distributions of sums of independent random variables) with a failure probability of 10-9 to allow statistical fluctuation analyses six orders of magnitude lower than previously achieved,” Zhang explains. “Furthermore, with the high loss that occurs in long-distance QKD, the Chernoff bound – believed to be a future standard post-processing method – provides better, stricter parameter estimation in the statistical fluctuation analysis.”Interestingly, in their paper the scientists point MDIQKD security is inspired by the time-reversed EPR-based QKD protocol. “This can be explained by a virtual qubit idea,” Zhang says. “A sender first prepares an entangled state of the combined system of her virtual qubit and the qubit to be sent to the receiver. The sender then measures the virtual qubit, thereby preparing a BB84 state.” BB84 is a provably secure quantum key distribution scheme – in fact, the first quantum cryptography protocol – developed by Charles Bennett and Gilles Brassard in 1984 (hence its name) relying on the quantum property that information gain is only possible at the expense of disturbing the signal if the two states we are trying to distinguish are not orthogonal. “After making a Bell state measurement (BSM) and obtaining a successful outcome, the receiver announces the results to the sender and the third party in the quantum system, resulting in their virtual qubits becoming entangled. (Bell states are maximally entangled quantum states of two qubits; the Bell state measurement is a joint quantum-mechanical measurement of two qubits that determines which of the four Bell states the two qubits are in.) “In this sense, the protocol is directly equivalent to an entanglement based protocol, only with the time direction reversed.”In addition, the new MDIQKD protocol does not rely on any assumption on measurement. “In the virtual qubit idea, we can see that a sender prepares the BB84 state by measuring a virtual qubit. Since the sender could have delayed the measurement on this virtual qubit until after the receiver performs a Bell state measurement and announces its results, the receiver’s BSM cannot affect the BB84 state preparation process, and so the receiver cannot obtain any information about the BB84 state. In other words, security does not rely on any assumption on measurement.”Another result described in the paper is that the novel MDIQKD system’s techniques constitute a critical ingredient for a quantum repeater and long-distance quantum communication. “Performing a Bell-state measurement is an intrinsic element in these situations,” Zhang points out, because it requires good interference of two independent laser sources. Again, in our work we for the first time have shown the feasibility of this kind of interference, especially at a distance 200 km. Besides the laser modulation techniques, the feedback systems developed for this purpose – for example, time calibration and wavelength calibration – are also of great importance to realizing a long-distance quantum repeater.”The researchers point out that their results have a range of implications for future quantum communication systems, one clearly being it paving the way towards a quantum network with measurement-device-independent security. “Our MDIQKD system includes two clients and one server. With the help of a system-wide feedback system, all users are time-synchronized and all independent laser sources have the same wavelength. All these techniques are definitely a solid foundation of building an MDIQKD network. In addition, to add more clients into the network, all that is needed is placing an active optical switch in the server’s site – and with off-the-shelf optical switches, this MDIQKD network can be built in the near future.”The novel MDIQKD protocol has a star-type structure in which the detection system placed in the Bell-state measurement site as a server, allowing it to be shared by all transmitters – a structure very suitable to a QKD network with a star-type structure, since all the end-node clients can share the entire measurement system of the center-node server. This means that, importantly, only laser sources and modulators are required when more clients are added to the network. Zhang notes that these devices are much smaller and cheaper than the complex, expensive detectors – a factor preferred for creating an economical network.The scientists have also performed a field test in which their system has been inserted into an installed fiber network to demonstrate the feasibility of MDIQKD in an unstable environment. “Previously, an MDIQKD field test was performed over an 18.6 km deployed fiber by Wolfgang Tittel’s group at the University of Calgary1,” Zhang tells Phys.org. “However, a random modulated decoy state was not added in that experiment, so a secure key was not actually generated. Moreover, all other laboratory demonstrations are performed without perturbation of the field environment.” Based on the technology developed in their experiment, the researchers have achieved a 16.9 bps secure key rate over a 30 km fiber network of total length‡.Zhang and his co-authors envision a number of future real-world applications that would be made feasible by using a single fiber to transmit both signal laser pulses and synchronization laser pulses, as well as by minimizing noise generated from Raman spontaneous scattering. “To make MDIQKD more attractive for potential users, our goal is to have only one single fiber required for each link. This would decrease the resources required by real-world applications, such as voice calls and file transfers, and would be especially useful in some particular situations.” For example, a user having insufficient fiber link resources could multiplex a single fiber link to do classical synchronization and single-photon transmission – or in the occasional situation when a user performs QKD tasks, it would be preferable to have one fiber link rather than two in order to conserve normally unused resources.Zhang adds that a significant concern when adopting one single fiber is strong spontaneous Raman scattering of the synchronization light, which introduces additional noise to the signal and thus increases error rates. (Spontaneous Raman scattering is the inelastic scattering of photons – in which the kinetic energy of an incident particle is not conserved, but lost or increased – in random time intervals.) “Typically, the power of the synchronization light is at least five orders of magnitude higher than the signal light – so spontaneous Raman scattering could be disastrous. We therefore have to be careful when multiplexing these two kinds of light, because otherwise the resulting high noise and error rates would male all real world applications impossible.”Moving forward, Zhang says that the scientists plan to build a polarization-encoding MDIQKD system, which let them remove the phase stabilization that is currently required, as well as other possible innovations. “In our experiment, wavelength calibration is based on an optical spectrum analyzer. However, in addition to this simple and direct approach, we plan to develop an alternative way without an optical spectrum analyzer – but only with the evaluation of two independent laser sources. This can be realized by observing Hong-Ou-Mandel dip.” (The Hong–Ou–Mandel effect is a two-photon interference effect in quantum optics that occurs when two identical single-photon waves enter a 50:50 beam splitter, one in each input port. When both photons are identical they will extinguish each other – but if they become more distinguishable the probability of detection will increase, allowing the interferometer to accurately measure bandwidth, path lengths and timing.) Moreover, Zhang adds, the researchers plan to build a three-layer architecture to generate, manage and use the secure key, respectively, which will lead to a more complete and practical QKD network.”Since the Bell state measurement is so common in quantum information,” Zhang concludes, “our Bell state measurement techniques can be utilized in other quantum information tasks.” “These tasks include the quantum repeater mentioned above, quantum fingerprinting and quantum teleportation.” (Phys.org)—In the ongoing effort to make communications secure, Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) theoretically provides a solution – but to the delight of increasingly sophisticated hackers, falls short in real-world systems due to implementation deviating from mathematical models. A number of QKD variants – including Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution (DIQKD) and the more recently introduced Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution (MDIQKD) – attempt to close the gap between theory and practice with varying degrees of success. These two variants differ in several ways, the most important being that DIQKD requires but unlike MDIQKD cannot easily achieve very high detection efficiency and low channel loss to yield secure keys, while MDIQKD, unlike DIQKD, does not rely on any ideal devices and can close the most vulnerable QKD security hole by removing all side-channels from the measurement unit. Nevertheless, previous MDIQKD systems have had limitations as well, such as limited distance and a low key rate of less than 0.1 bit/s. Journal information: Physical Review Letters (a) Schematic layout of our MDIQKD setup. Alice’s (Bob’s) signal laser pulses (1550 nm) are modulated into three decoy-state intensities by AM1. An AMZI, an AM2–4, and one PM are used to encode qubits. Charlie’s setup consists of a polarization stabilization system and a BSM system. The polarization stabilization system in each link includes an EPC, a PBS, and a SPAPD. The BSM system includes an interference BS and two SNSPDs. (b) Time calibration system. Two SynLs (1570 nm) are adopted, with the 500 kHz shared time reference generated from a crystal oscillator circuit (COC) and with the time delayed by a programmable delay chip (PDC). Alice (Bob) receives the SynL pulses with a PD and then regenerates a system clock of 75 MHz. WDM: wavelength division multiplexer, ConSys: control system. (c) Phase stabilization system. Circ: circulator, PC: polarization controller, PS: phase shifter. Credit: Tang, Yan-Lin et al. (2014) Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution over 200 km. Phys. Rev. Lett. 113:190501. High-fidelity photon-to-atom quantum state transfer could form backbone of quantum networks More information: Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution over 200 km, Physical Review Letters (2014) 113:190501, doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.190501Related:1Real-World Two-Photon Interference and Proof-of-Principle Quantum Key Distribution Immune to Detector Attacks, Physical Review Letters (2013) 111:130501, doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.130501†Detectors and cryocooling systems developed by Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)‡Paper to be published in IEEE Journal of Selected Topics of Quantum Electronics Explore further Citation: Hackers begone: Measurement-device-independent QKD increases clock rate and transmission distance while reducing failure (2014, December 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-12-hackers-begone-measurement-device-independent-qkd-clock.html © 2014 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Invisible magnetic sensors measure magnetic fields without disturbing them

first_img Citation: Invisible magnetic sensors measure magnetic fields without disturbing them (2018, April 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-invisible-magnetic-sensors-fields-disturbing.html Currently, most of the magnetic sensors used in today’s computers, airplanes, cars, and other systems distort the magnetic fields that they are measuring. These distortions can cause major problems for some applications, in particular biomedical techniques, that require highly accurate measurements, and can also cause cross-talk in sensor arrays. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Magnetic invisibility cloak shields magnets from magnetic fields Simulation of a spherical shell that cancels the distortions caused by a ferromagnetic sphere, making the sphere invisible (magnetically undetectable) from the outside. Credit: Mach-Batlle et al. ©2018 American Institute of Physics Explore furthercenter_img More information: Rosa Mach-Batlle, Carles Navau, and Alvaro Sanchez. “Invisible magnetic sensors.” Applied Physics Letters. DOI: 10.1063/1.5023565 In a new study, researchers have designed “invisible” magnetic sensors—sensors that are magnetically invisible so that they can still detect but do not distort the surrounding magnetic fields. The researchers, Rosa Mach-Batlle, Carles Navau, and Alvaro Sanchez at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, have published a paper on the invisible magnetic sensors in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters.”This is the first proposal to render a magnetic sensor invisible,” Mach-Batlle told Phys.org. “The invisibility can even be made exact in some cases, something never achieved before, to our knowledge.”Many magnetic sensors are made of ferromagnetic materials, which have the advantage of enhanced sensor detectability compared to other materials. However, the downside of ferromagnetic materials is that they attract magnetic fields, causing distortions in the same magnetic fields that the sensors are detecting. The challenging part of making invisible magnetic sensors is to simultaneously cancel these distortions while still allowing the sensors to detect the magnetic fields. Previously, researchers have designed magnetic cloaks for cloaking magnetic objects that make it impossible to magnetically detect them from the outside. However, these cloaks work both ways, so that the cloaked magnetic objects are completely isolated from and unable to detect any external magnetic fields. So a cloaked sensor could no longer function as a sensor.In the new study, the researchers have proposed a method for making a sensor magnetically invisible while maintaining its ability to sense. Their strategy uses a spherical magnetic shell that cancels out the leading term of the distortion that the sensor creates in response to external magnetic fields. The shell is also designed with tiny “air gaps” that allow a fraction of the external magnetic field to arrive at the sensor. Theoretically, the invisibility can be made perfect under certain conditions—specifically, when the sensor is spherical and the magnetic field is uniform.According to the researchers’ model, the proposed spherical shell must be made of a material with certain properties (in particular, a precise diamagnetic permeability) that do not exist in nature. Nevertheless, the researchers expect that these properties can be emulated with metamaterials made of high-temperature superconductors. In the future, the researchers plan to further explore these possibilities as well as variations on magnetic cloaking.”We are developing ideas such as exploring cloaking properties for AC fields or incorporating the intriguing concept of negative static permeability for creating novel shapes of magnetic fields,” Sanchez said. Journal information: Applied Physics Letters © 2018 Phys.orglast_img read more

Why Forgetfulness Might Actually Help You

first_imgThis pattern is called retrieval-induced forgetting. It’s directed in part by the prefrontal cortex, which controls executive functions involved in mental control and decision-making. It makes it easier to access memories that get used a lot, and more difficult to retrieve memories that compete with them, says Michael C. Anderson, a professor of cognitive neuroscience at the University of Cambridge in England and a leading researcher on the topic. A growing body of research offers a more welcome excuse: Forgetting stuff can actually be a byproduct of rigorous thinking, smooth decision-making or heightened creativity. Still, forgetting can serve a purpose, enabling us to think more clearly by eliminating interference from competing thoughts. Many people worry that forgetting names, facts or tasks on their to-do list is a sign of aging or mental decline. Forgetting can help us block out useless or outdated information and keep us from fixating on a single set of ideas or thoughts. And contrary to the notion that forgetfulness reflects a withering of brain cells, scientists say it can actually be driven by the growth of new neurons in the hippocampus, a brain region linked to memory. This doesn’t excuse major memory mishaps. It’s a problem to draw a mental blank when making a presentation, forget to pick up a co-worker you promised a ride or offend a client by spacing out on a critical rule of etiquette. And of course, purposeful forgetting doesn’t include the kind of extensive memory loss that comes with dementia or similar health problems. He likens the process to search-engine optimization for the brain. “The brain balances remembering and forgetting gracefully to facilitate optimal use of memory,” Dr. Anderson says. Read the whole story: The Wall Street Journallast_img read more

Gear up to haunt this Halloween

If you have plans to spook your near and dear ones this halloween, then Fast Turtle is a one stop-shop for all your party supplies and themes. Fast turtle, the store started by Zarine Batra a year ago is here to offer solutions for all your theme party essentials.‘To make these occasions unforgettable in the best possible way with the right party accessories is key objective for the origin of Fast Turtle,’ says Zarine. This year, the store is offering Halloween accessories like horrified nails, dragon costumes, pumpkin faces and more.So head your way towards Fast Turtle soon and gear up to haunt. read more

Now AAP outstation members can campaign

first_imgThe Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) launched its ‘calling campaign’ on Monday here to convince voters in Delhi to vote for the party.“We are using our party data bank which contains mobile phones numbers of our registered members. Anyone who wishes to join this campaign must register himself/herself with the party. Once party verify the application the person, s/he can participate in the campaign. After the verification of the volunteer, the party provides around 20-25 mobile numbers to a volunteer who can make the call at this number at his convenient time to promote the party and convince the voters to vote for AAP,” said Atishi Marlena, a senior AAP leader. Also Read – Company director arrested for swindling Rs 345 croreThe campaigning will be conducted by the AAP supporters who live outside of Delhi and abroad and want to promote the party for coming election.The volunteers have to pay their own mobile phone bill as party can does not reimburses it. On the idea which led to the campaign, Marlena said, “People wanted to promote and work for the party and they wanted to take active part in this coming election. However it is not possible for them to come to Delhi, so we find this the best way to use them for the betterment of the party. It makes a good impression among the people,” said Marlena.last_img read more

Steelmakers seek immediate implementation of customs duty hike

first_imgWith imports set to hit a record high in the current fiscal, steel-makers on Sunday urged the government to bring the provisioned customs duty hike in the Budget into effect immediately to bail them out of the deepening crisis.”Some secondary steel producers have already resorted to production cut and instead of making on their own, they have now ventured into trading importing from China and other countries,” Jayant Acharya, Director (Commercial), JSW Steel, said. Also Read – I-T issues 17-point checklist to trace unaccounted DeMO cashFacing a host of other problems such as higher production cost due to dearer raw materials and inflated interest rates, major producers are also left with no money to further invest, which is tantamount to government’s “Make in India” programme. “Government should implement the enabling budgetary provision for raising the customs duty as soon as possible to give steel-makers a little elbowroom,” Acharya said.He also added that some non-tariff barriers to be put in place to safeguard against the abnormal surge in imports. Paying heed to steel-makers’ plea, the Budget has created a possibility of raising peak import duty for steels to 15 per cent from 10 per cent now, aimed at protecting the home-grown firms from rising imports. But, it has been kept as an enabling provision for suitable imposition.Meanwhile, imports have jumped by over 67 per cent during April-February period of current fiscal to 8.39 million tonnes (MT).last_img read more

Quench your thirst with cool drinks at Sharbat Mela

first_imgThe Delhi Tourism brings to you yet another annual Sharbat Mela to quench your thirst in this scorching heat. The annual extravaganza will be organised at Dilli Haat, Pitampura, from June 19 – 21, 2015.The mela promises to offer traditional and modern drinks. Drinks prepared from traditional herbs will also be on offer. Popular drinks such as thandai, lassi, jaljeera, mango shake, aam panna, sattu, kokam (a drink from Maharashtra) and many other varieties of milk shakes will be on offer.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Companies such as Hitkari, Hamdard, Simbhavli Suger Mill, Mother Dairy and Aroma will be participating in the festival.  Besides, stalls of henna, ittar and gulabjal will also be put up at the mela. Summer special swings and camel rides for children will also be available.Apart from enjoying a variety of drinks at the Sharbat Mela, visitors can also shop at craft and garment stalls.  Moreover, cultural programmes by the Punjabi Academy of Art and Culture and the Government of NCT Delhi promise enthrall the audience. So, get ready to beat the heat with a variety of drinks at the Sharbat Mela.last_img read more

Mobile library for book lovers in North Dinajpur

first_imgKolkata: In an effort to arouse the interest of reading books particularly among the youth, the state Mass Education and Library Services department has introduced a mobile library in North Dinajpur district.The mobile library is equipped with 1,500 books that ranges from short stories, novels, poems, books on cuisine, sports books, children books and school texts.The mobile library has been recently launched by the Minister for Mass Education & Library Services Siddiqullah Chowdhury at a government programme in Karnajhora. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killed”The books will be lent out for a period of 15 days to a reader. On the 17th day, the mobile library will visit the reader’s address. When he returns the book, he can issue another new book,” Chowdhury said.The mobile library has been christened as Ghare Baire – inspired from the famous novel of the same name by Rabindranath Tagore.A senior official of the department said that out of 74 gram panchayats (GP) in South Dinajpur, there is not a single library in 53 GPs. “We have strategically chosen this place so that the readers have access to books,” the official said. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPThe local administration is conducting a survey as there is a demand for school text books there. “Many students cannot afford to buy books due to financial problems. This will also be of immense help to them,” theminister said.The Library services department is taking a slew of measures to encourage the young generation to visit the libraries in the state.There are around 2,480 libraries and 300 of them have closed down. “We have recently done a survey on the state libraries, conducted by a Gurgaon-based agency. It has come to light that people of the age group of 55 to 60 visit the state libraries. A number of libraries do not have toilets and drinking water.A library in the city has also been found with no facilities of drinking water and toilet. This is not desirable and we are working for developing these basic facilities,” anofficial said.last_img read more

Goutam Deb inaugurates North Bengal Book Fair

first_imgDarjeeling: The 36th North Bengal Book Fair was inaugurated by Tourism Minister Goutam Deb in Siliguri on Thursday. Organised by the Greater Siliguri Book Sellers Guild, the fair at the Mela Ground in Siliguri has 85 stalls. “Though it is the age of computers and the internet, books have no substitute. Parents should encourage their wards to read more books. Reading habit needs to be inculcated from a young age,” stated Deb in his speech. He also asked the organizers to ensure that the venue remains clean and green. The book fair remains open from 2 to 8 pm everyday. It will end on December 2.last_img read more

School teacher shot dead by unidentified miscreants

first_imgKolkata: A school teacher from Raghunathpur area in Purulia was shot dead by unidentified miscreants on Friday evening.The incident took place when the victim, Chinmoy Mondal, was returning home after buying some sports equipment for his school. According to the police, the victim was riding his motorcycle when the miscreants stopped his way. He was just a few metres away from his house at Raghunathpur when he was shot at. Mondal tried to flee the spot when one of the miscreants took out a gun and shot at him. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe victim received bullet injuries on his face and fell on the ground. The miscreants fled the spot immediately after the incident. After hearing the sound of the gunshot, locals gathered at the spot and found him lying in a pool of blood. He was immediately rushed to the Raghunathpur Super-specialty hospital where the doctors pronounced him brought dead. The body was later sent for postmortem examination. The police are yet to confirm the motive behind his murder. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedA teacher of a local school at Raghunathpur, the victim had gone to a nearby market to buy sports equipment for the school. He was returning home at around 10.30 pm. His wife, Papia, told the police that the victim had no personal rivalry with anyone. She demanded a probe into the incident. Police are conducting raids to nab the culprits who were behind the attack. According to the preliminary investigation, police suspect that an old rivalry might have led to the incident. A detailed probe has been initiated in this regard.last_img read more

North Bengal Development Dept completes tender process for projects worth Rs 700

first_imgDarjeeling: The North Bengal Development Department (NBDD) has completed the tender process for projects amounting to Rs 700 crore. Besides this, tenders for projects amounting to Rs 300 crore are also scheduled to be completed by March.”With each passing year, the allocation of funds to this department is being increased by the state government. This is a clear indication of the state’s focus on North Bengal,” stated Rabindranath Ghosh, minister in charge of North Bengal Development department. Also Read – 3 injured, flight, train services hit as rains lash BengalChief Minister Mamata Banerjee always stresses on North Bengal and reiterates her government’s commitment towards the development of this region. The above tenders will facilitate around 300 development projects. Earlier, meetings were held where the District Magistrates of the eight districts of North Bengal were directed to ensure that the projects are speedily completed without compromising on the quality of work. “Completion of tender processes ensures timely completion of development works as well. We are also ensuring that the ongoing projects are in no way halted in between. For this, we have increased skilled manpower specially engineers. We are also engaging retired engineers so that there is no shortage,” added the minister. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedIn 2011, the North Bengal Development Department came into existence with an allotment of Rs. 180 crore. The present allocation of fund is to the tune of Rs. 660 crore. The funds are used to construct roads, bridges, school, colleges, community halls and haats (market places.). In Cooch Behar, the department has taken up a number of projects. In Malda, a bridge is under construction at a cost of Rs 132 crore. “We have created committees in each district to ensure even distribution of projects in all the districts of North Bengal,” stated Ghosh. Taking a step further, each block of North Bengal will be allotted Rs 2 crore for development projects from the NBDD. “With this amount the blocks can take up development projects within an upper-cost limit of Rs 30,000,” informed the minister. The number of projects being taken up by the department is steadily on the rise. “Owing to this we are recruiting 20 sub-assistant engineers,” Ghosh added.last_img read more

FDCI celebrates 10th year of India Couture Week

first_imgExtravagant showcasing of opulence and craft, the India Couture Week 2017, is back again this year in a seven day affair from July 24-30 at the Taj Palace Hotel.The Fashion Design Council of India (FDCI) is pleased to announce the dates for the country’s most extravagant showcasing of opulence and craft at the India Couture Week 2017, as it ushers in 10 years of this venerable fashion event.For the first time ever, the most coveted names of the fashion industry will bring alive, unmitigated splendour at a few off-site locations in the capital. The ramp at the Fashion Design Council of India’s flagship event will be enlivened when top 14 designers in the industry will set the mood for trends that will remain relevant in a country that loves to celebrate life with sheer abundance, colour and unabashed shine. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfAnnouncing the dates of this biggest couture event in the country, Sunil Sethi, President FDCI said, “This is a momentous year for us, 10 years of Couture Week has been an incredible journey, which has been the only event in the country to offer a prestigious platform to couturiers to showcase their talent in offering irrepressible indulgence. The journey would not have been possible without the support of board members and the FDCI team. We look forward to presenting many more editions of this magical event as we take it to a new high with seven days.”A non-profit organisation, the Fashion Design Council of India (FDCI), is the apex body of fashion design in India, represented by over 400 members. Founded on the premise of promoting, nurturing, and representing the best of fashion and design talent in the country; its prime objective is to propagate the business of fashion. FDCI stays true to its commitment to promote the ‘Make in India’ label as handlooms take center stage.last_img read more

ITBP band gives a stellar maiden performance

first_imgWith 16 tunes of martial and Indian music playing, the Indo-Tibetan Border Police (ITBP) gave a stellar performance at the Siri Fort Auditorium, New Delhi. This was the first such concert by the ITBP band. Minister of State for Home Affairs Kiren Rijiju was present as the Chief Guest among other distinguished guests, senior officers, and personnel of the CAPFs and their families on the eve of Holi 2018. The one hour concert was organised by Major Nazir Hussain, VSM Retd. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe concert was a classic mix of traditional military tunes and Bollywood evergreen numbers. Rijiju appreciated the concert and said that such patriotic programmes should be organised by other forces as well in the entire country. The Minister complimented the band for the rendition of the patriotic song “Hum Sarhad ke Sainani”, which he said showed the love and commitment of the ITBP jawans for their motherland. He concluded by greeting the ITBP Director General RK Pachanada for winning the trophy for ‘best marching contingent’ at this years’ Republic Day parade and lauded the contribution of ITBP Band contingent for inspiring tunes for the best show by the marching contingent on Rajpath.last_img read more

Parental controls dont stop teens from watching porn

first_imgParents, take note. If you think that Internet filtering tools – such as parental controls – will stop your teenage child from accessing explicit sexual content online then you may be wrong, a new study suggests.The findings, published in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behaviour and Social Networking, indicated that Internet filtering tools are ineffective.According to the researchers from the University of Oxford in Britain, the use of Internet filtering tools is widespread but there has been no conclusive evidence on their effectiveness until now. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”It’s important to consider the efficacy of Internet filtering. Internet filtering tools are expensive to develop and maintain, and can easily ‘underblock’ due to the constant development of new ways of sharing content,” said co-author Victoria Nash.The research team presented two studies – one exploratory analysis of secondary data collected in the European Union and one preregistered study focused on British adolescents and caregivers – with nearly 15,000 participants. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive”We were also interested to find out how many households would need to use filtering technologies in order to stop one adolescent from seeing online pornography,” said co-author Andrew Przybylski.”The findings from our preliminary study indicated that somewhere between 17 and 77 households would need to use Internet filtering tools in order to prevent a single young person from accessing sexual content,” Przybylski added.The results from follow-up study showed no statistically or practically significant protective effects for filtering. The researchers noted that there should be more research done to solidify these findings.last_img read more

Neckneck battle surfaces in Bengal

first_imgKolkata: The 42 Lok Sabha seats in Bengal witnessed a neck-and-neck fight between Trinamool Congress and BJP. While TMC won 21 seats, BJP bagged 16 with a single seat for Congress. TMC was leading in one seat, BJP in a couple and Congress in one as per the last poll result update.TMC’s showing was good, particularly in South 24-Parganas, Kolkata, Howrah and Birbhum, where it managed to retain all the seats it had won in 2014. In South 24-Parganas, Pratima Mondal won the Joynagar seat by over 3 lakh votes, while Chowdhury Mohan Jatua won the Mathurapur seat by around 2 lakh votes. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataAbhisekh Banejee came out with flying colours in the Diamond Harbour seat by over 3 lakh votes, whereas Mimi Chakraborty won the Jadavpur seat by over 2.9 lakh votes. The prestigious Kolkata North and Kolkata South seats were won by Sudip Bandyopadhyay and Mala Roy respectively, while Howrah and Uluberia were won by Prasun Banerjee and Sajda Ahmed. The party also managed to win both the seats in Birbhum district, with Satabdi Roy bagging Birbhum and Asit Mal winning from Bolpur. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateTamluk, Kanthi and Ghatal went in favour of TMC as well, while BJP’s Dilip Ghosh and Kunar Hembram bagged Midnapore and Jhargram, where TMC had a lead of 34,78,883 votes in 2014. The Purulia seat also swung in favour of Jyotirmay Singh Mahato of BJP, where TMC had won by 1,53,877 votes in 2014. The Malda Uttar seat that was won by Mausam Noor of Congress, also swung in favour of the saffron party with Khagen Murmu winning. Noor ended up in the losing side this year, contesting on TMC’s ticket. Abu Hasem Khan Chowdhury of Congress was leading in the Maldah Dakshin seat as of the last update. In Murshidabad, TMC’s Khalilur Rahman defeated Congress’s Abhijit Mukherjee from the Jangipur seat by a margin of over 3 lakh votes. Mukherjee, the son of former President Pranab Mukherjee, had won by a margin of 8,161 votes in 2014. Adhir Chowdhury of Congress, meanwhile, retained the Behrampur seat though his lead dropped to 78,000 from 3,56,567 last year. The Murshidabad seat that was bagged by Left Front in 2014, was grabbed by TMC’s Abu Taher Khan. The Krishnanagar seat was retained by Mahua Maitra of TMC, who won by over 65,000 votes. The Ranaghat seat, the second in Nadia district, went to Jagannath Sarkar of BJP where TMC had a lead of 2,01,767 votes in 2014. In North 24-Parganas, Sougata Roy of TMC managed to retain the Dum Dum seat and Kakoli Ghosh Dastidar won the Barasat seat, while newcomer Nusrat Jahan won from Basirhat. The Bongaon seat, where TMC had won by 1,46,601 votes in 2014, swung in favour of Santanu Thakur of BJP. The Barrackpore seat witnessed defeat of TMC’s Dinesh Trivedi, where BJP’s Arjun Singh won by a narrow margin of around 13,000 votes. Hooghly, meanwhile, had a mixed result for TMC with Kalyan Banerjee retaining the Sreerampore seat and the Hooghly seat swinging in favour of BJP with Locket Chatterjee winning over Ratna Dey Nag of TMC. Aparupa Poddar of TMC has a narrow lead of over 2,000 votes in Arambagh, according to the latest update. Burdwan East was retained by Sunil Mondal of TMC, while the Burdwan-Durgapur seat was witnessing a lead by the saffron party, as per last reports. The Asansol seat was retained by BJP’s Babul Supriyo. TMC suffered a setback, particularly in North Bengal. John Barla of BJP defeated party candidate Dasrath Tirkey, while Nisith Pramanik shocked TMC’s Paresh Chandra Adhikary. Jayanta Kumar Roy of BJP also emerged victorious over Bijoy Chandra Barman of the ruling party from Jalpaiguri, whereas BJP’s Sukanta Majumdar snatched the Balurghat seat from TMC’s Arpita Ghosh. TMC had won all these seats in 2014. BJP’s Raju Bista managed to retain the Darjeeling seat, while the Raiganj seat that saw a narrow margin win for Left Front’s Mohammed Salim in 2014, also went in favour of the saffron party. TMC witnessed collapse in the two seats of Bankura district, with Saumitra Khan winning from the Bishnupur seat. Both the seats had been won by TMC in the last Lok Sabha elections.last_img read more

Lord Tirupati Balaji Brahmotsav Festival Starts in Delhi

first_imgThe Delhi Temple of Shri Venkateswara Swamy Vari, popularly known as Tirupati Balaji will be observing the Annual Brahmotsav Festival from May 15-25, 2019.Spread across 1.2 acres, the Delhi Temple of Lord Tirupati Balaji is located in the heart of New Delhi near Birla Mandir. It is under the aegis of Tirumala Tirupati Devasthanams (TTD) and is a replica of the Temple situated at Tirupati in Chittoor district of Andhra Pradesh. Brahmotsav, is the most important festival celebrated in Tirumala as it marks Lord Srinivasa’s self-manifestation day by Lord Brahma. The annual Brahmotsav is conducted with the same fervor at the Delhi temple as is done in Tirumala. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfDuring the festival, the Utsav-murti (processional deity) of the presiding deity Lord Venkateswara (Tirupati Balaji), along with his consorts Padmavati Ammavaru (Mahalakshmi Maa) and Andal Ammavaru (Dharti Maa) is taken out on a procession on different Vahans on the streets around the Temple complex. The major highlights of the festival are Rath Yatra on different Vahans namely Pedda Sesha (seven-headed snake), Chinna Sesha (five-headed snake), Hamsa (swan), Muthya Pupandiri (pearl bower), Simha (lion), Kalpvriksha (wish-fulfing tree), Hanumantha (Hanuman), Sarvabupala (protector of universe), Garuda (eagle), Gaja (elephant), Surya Prabha (sun) and Chandra Prabha (moon). This year 10 vahans have been gifted by ardent devotees to the Delhi Temple of Lord Venkateswara each costing approximately Rs. 2 lacs. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveSpecial Pujas such as Abhishek, Kalyan Utasv (Lord Balaji’s marriage), Havan, etc. Mahaprasad will be done daily. The world-famous Tirumala Laddoos will also be available for Rs.100 each. The festival will also feature cultural programmes and special stalls. Praveen Prakash (IAS), Resident Commissioner Government of Andhra Pradesh and President, LAC, TTD has requested all devotees residing in Delhi and NCR to come forward to join the festivities and support the Delhi Temple Brahmotsav with heart and soul. Devotees may contact the Delhi temple for extending any support and donation.last_img read more

Draculas Cannonballs – Incredible Find Connected to Vlad the Impaler

first_imgResearchers have discovered medieval cannonballs that they believe were used by the Wallacian Voivode (ruler) Vlad the Impaler, or Vlad III Dracula, also known as Vlad Tepes, during a battle in 1461 with the Ottoman Turks. The ruler of Wallachia was known for his savage battle tactics–including, yes, impaling–and also for inspiring Bram Stoker’s fictional depiction of Count Dracula, an aristocratic Transylvanian vampire with a peculiar hunger.Painting of Vlad TepesThe discovery was made in the ruins of a medieval fortress in Svishtov, a small town in the northern part of the country, by Professor Nikolay Ovcharov from the National Institute and Museum of Archaeology in Sofia and his team. “What’s really interesting is that from the [early] Ottoman period we have found cannonballs. We rejoice at those small cannonballs because they are from culverins,” Ovcharov said in an interview with Nova TV. “These were the earliest cannons which were for the 15th century, up until the 16th century, they weren’t in use after that. That was precisely the time of Vlad Dracula, there is no doubt that they are connected with the siege and conquest of the Zishtova Fortress by Vlad Dracula in 1461.”AdChoices广告inRead invented by TeadsSvishtov, Bulgaria. Photo by Mincov CC BY 3.0The archaeologist said it’s likely that Dracula stayed at the fortress after conquering it. “The truth is that Vlad Dracula besieged this place, conquered it, and most probably also resided here [briefly],” Ovcharov stated.Vlad fought many battles and had countless people done away with whom he considered enemies. His most hated opponent was the Ottoman sultan. During this time period, the Ottomans were attempting to conquer sections of Eastern Europe. In 1453, Sultan Mehmed II had conquered Constantinople, and the Ottoman powers stretched over the Carpathians, a threat to mainland Europe. By 1481 the Ottomans had control of the Balkans peninsula.In today’s odd news…https://t.co/Phck5d5j75— Chris Ciaccia (@Chris_Ciaccia) June 6, 2019What makes Vlad’s relationship to the Ottomans complex is that Vlad’s father had made a treaty with them and offered his own two sons, Dracula and Radu, to serve in their army and learn from them. When Vlad turned against them, he was a dangerous foe because of that knowledge. Once he was king, Vlad strengthened the Wallachian army to fight the Ottoman forces.Pope Pius II called for a crusade; Vlad pledged his allegiance to the Pope and the crusade. Vlad devastated the Bulgarian lands between Serbia and the Black Sea, including the fortress where the cannonballs were found. Vlad was killed in battle in 1477 and his head was sent to Sultan Mehmed. Today there is a statue of Vlad in Bucharest, where he is considered a folk hero.Related Video:The link between Vlad and Dracula comes from the word “dracul.” The King of Hungary inducted Vlad’s father into a knightly order called the Order of the Dragon. This designation earned him a new surname: Dracul. The name came from the old Romanian word for dragon, which is “drac.”His son, Vlad III, would later be known as the “son of Dracul,” or in old Romanian, Drăculea, hence Dracula. “In modern Romanian, the word “drac” also refers to the devil.)Statue of Vlad Tepes in Romania. Photo by CC BY-SA 3.0 ROVlad Tepes was born in 1431 in what is now Transylvania, the central region of modern-day Romania. But the link between Vlad the Impaler and Transylvania is a bit weak, according to Florin Curta, a professor of medieval history and archaeology at the University of Florida.“[Stoker’s] Dracula is linked to Transylvania, but the real, historic Dracula — Vlad III — never owned anything in Transylvania,” Curta said in an interview with Live Science. Bran Castle, a modern-day tourist attraction in Transylvania that is often referred to as Dracula’s castle, was never the home of the Wallachian prince.Bran Castle. Photo by Todor Bozhinov CC BY-SA 4.0“Because the castle is in the mountains in this foggy area and it looks spooky, it’s what one would expect of Dracula’s castle,” Curta said. “But he [Vlad III] never lived there. He never even set foot there.” According to the book Dracula: Sense and Nonsense, by Elizabeth Miller, in 1890 Stoker read a book about Wallachia. Although it did not mention Vlad III, Stoker was struck by the word “Dracula.” He wrote in his notes, “in Wallachian language means DEVIL.”Related Article: New Findings Suggest Vlad the Impaler was Imprisoned Beneath this CastleBram Stoker never came out and said that his vampire creation was Vlad the Impaler, only that he was from a noble family. The connection was made much more explicitly in Francis Ford Coppola’s film Dracula and in such novels as Elizabeth Kostova’s The Historian.Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, and InStyle, has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books. Her new book, The Blue, is a spy story set in the 18th-century porcelain world. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.comlast_img read more

Renowned terrible golfer Charles Barkley is slightly less horrible at hitting a

first_imgCharles Barkley in the batting cage. pic.twitter.com/Jp4Ev4H6ab— Michael Gallagher (@MikeSGallagher) June 6, 2016Maybe Chuck is onto something. Charles Barkley is a Hall of Fame basketball player and a natural on TV as an NBA analyst. Sir Charles also has, arguably, the most nausea inducing golf swing that has ever been witnessed by man. It’s been known to induce uncontrollable vomiting and cause temporary blindness if you stare at it to long.Barkley tried his hand at batting practice before the Cubs game tonight. Although he wasn’t exactly tearing the cover off the ball, his batting stroke is a masterpiece compared to his his NSFW golf hack. last_img read more

Colin went full Rain Man on Nate Burleson by recalling his dads

first_img Burleson was obviously surprised, and joked that Colin’s touching total-recall of his father was going to make him tear up like Tom Brady. Well played, sir.Colin is an excellent driver..@Nate13Burleson was headed to Washington until he wasn’t. Here’s how he ended up at @NevadaFootball #NationalSigningDay pic.twitter.com/k1S255H7Xi— Herd w/Colin Cowherd (@TheHerd) February 1, 2017 Advertisement Everybody remembers the classic scene in Rain Man where Dustin Hoffman accurately counts the box of dropped toothpicks in the diner. 246. There’s four left in the box.Colin can’t count toothpicks like Ray, or count cards in Vegas – that we know of – but he does have a creepy savant-like recollection of specific details of individual games, plays, and players from 40 years years ago. 97X, bam! The future of rock n’ roll.Today, longtime NFL wide receiver and current NFL Network host Nate Burleson joined the show, and while discussing his college recruitment process, he mentioned that his father was Al Burleson was a defensive back at the University of Washington in the 70’s and later played in the CFL. He once held the record for the longest interception return for a touchdown (90 yards) in the Apple Cup.Colin, a Pacific Northwest native, not only remembered the elder Burleson, he remembered his jersey number. 18.  Uh oh, fifteen minutes to Judge Wapner.last_img read more

VIDEO Mets beer guy takes a hard foul ball to the jewels

first_imgA Mets’ beer guy took a hard line-drive foul ball to the babymakers while slinging suds in the aisles of Citi Field last night.The unfortunate vendor was hit with the liner while holding his beer tray above his head. There’s nothing worse than not being able to put up the defense shield before impact.He didn’t go down immediately, but the delayed wave of excruciating pain following contact eventually dropped him to a knee.Watch the video. We are all bad people for laughing:Mets Beer Guy gets rocked in the nuts with a foul ball pic.twitter.com/tT2DMLupiC— Alex B. (@KnicksCentral) April 19, 2017last_img read more

Joel Klatt mocks NFL Draft landing spots for the top QBs

first_imgThe NFL Draft is less than a month away, and the information and disinformation is flying out of NFL front offices at breakneck speed.FS1 Lead College Football Analyst Joel Klatt stopped by The Herd to tell Colin why Arizona has to trade Josh Rosen and select Kyler Murray #1 overall, and also predicted draft landing spots for the rest of the top projected quarterbacks.They also argued about Baker Mayfield and the Browns chanced to win the AFC North, because it’s just what Colin and Klatt do.last_img read more

Baker Shouldnt Be Ashamed of Changing

first_imgAlso:-Colin’s 3 Steps to Clear Up the Cowboys’ mess-Gruden is still box office-Aaron Rodgers isn’t the victim–Guessing return receptions for departed NBA starsGuests:Greg Jennings, Clarence Hill, Cris Collinsworth, and Lincoln Kennedy <span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>Baker shouldn’t be ashamed of changingBaker Mayfield recently made comments that he “won’t ever change” during his NFL career, but Colin thinks Baker should rethink that if he wants to have a great NFL career or an all-time one. He sees Baker has recently showed signs he’s growing up like not engaging in media fights with certain unnamed nationally syndicated radio hosts, and probably learning a lesson from opening his mouth over Duke Johnson’s contract situation.No one Baker’s age wants to admit they’re changing, but it’s for the better and he should embrace it. He probably will because he’s smart. He can either change and adapt like Tom Brady, or fade out of the league like Brett Favre doing it “his way.” Download and subscribe to get all of Colin’s podcasts, including his podcast exclusive Herd Saturday Podcasts exclusively at iHeart Radio, Google Play, or iTunes.last_img read more

Expand Your Ad Empire

first_imgApril 7, 2008 Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. The coolest ad technologies aren’t the ones that cost the most–they’re the ones that engage users. Thankfully, this year’s crop of cool tools doesn’t require the kind of attention your MySpace page does. From reaching people on their mobile to enhancing your online videos, these innovative ad trends can set you apart as a tech-savvy company while reaching users right when they’re ready to buy–and encouraging them to buy more.Bar Codes With Extra Info Register Now » If you’ve already started making online videos related to your products or services, adding overlay ads–or letting customers create them–is almost a no-brainer. With overlays, instead of just slotting in pre-, mid- or post-roll ad spots that nobody wants to watch, your ads become a part of the content, Pop-Up Video style.”The more relevant you can make an ad to the content, the more the ad becomes the content. And this, in turn, drives far higher click-through rates,” says Robert Lane, whose Ottawa-based business, Overlay.tv, is making overlay technology more accessible to businesses.The company allows anyone to take an online video and create overlay links in it for free. Then it gives you the code to embed your video on any website. Overlay.tv’s affiliate program also gives incentives to third-party content creators to link to your products.Soon, customers will be able to click on ads like these during their favorite TV shows, making product placement even more marketable. “Commercial TV, like you know it now, will be history in five years,” says Warbasse. “Stage display, seamless point-and-click advertising is going to be all the rage.”Bluetooth BeamingThough much has been made about Bluetooth’s ad capabilities since it started gaining popularity on people’s cell phones, it has only recently become a viable advertising technology. More than 60 percent of North American mobile phones sport Bluetooth and many new laptops and other portable gadgets come enabled with the beaming tech.Through Bluetooth, consumers can download coupons, short videos and audio files. They can then forward the content to other Bluetooth users with a P2P connection. It’s most effective at targeting consumers as they’re entering stores or theaters, walking around trade shows or attending sporting events, since shoppers are particularly receptive to getting coupons right before they buy a product.Prime Point Media, a Norcross, Georgia-based company with a network of more than 700,000 Bluetooth-enabled outdoor ad spots that has carried ads for Pepsi and the U.S. Navy, sees high response rates for its ads. Prime Point president, Karen Robinson, says rates of 13 to 20 percent are typical because of the ads’ relevance, street-level position and call to action.Bluetooth isn’t just for large companies, either. Robinson says a multi-month campaign can start as low as $5,000. She says the secret to using Bluetooth advertising effectively is having compelling, relevant content and not abusing your relationship with consumers.Other up-and-coming ad spaces are also providing new ways to reach potential clients on their mobiles. Jangl, for one, offers ad-sponsored, number-free text and voice messaging through social networking and dating sites–similar to how Yahoo! tacks on ads at the end of its users’ mail messages. And as digital billboards continue to become more sophisticated and interactive, they’re offering a lot of creative, albeit power-gobbling, options for advertisers, though their price points tend to be a bit high for independent businesses.As ad technology continues to change and new ad spaces open up, keep your ear to your mobile, your Bluetooth on and your camera at the ready. And don’t shy away from trying something new.center_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals While you may think of “airline check-in” or “mail tracking” when you see the black-and-white squiggles that make up QR, or “Quick Response” codes, these 2-D data matrices are beginning to find their place in advertising.Already popular in Japan and parts of Europe and the United States, these square-shaped codes can turn a plain old paper ad into an opt-in part of your campaign. Customers scan them with their camera phones to get a hidden plain-text message, a person’s contact info, a redirect to a mobile website, or a song or image download.One QR campaign developed for the clothing industry by Philip Warbasse, founder of Los Angeles-based Warbasse Design, puts the codes on in-store apparel that allows shoppers to purchase sizes not in stock–right on their phones. The codes also offer customers a same-day in-store coupon, and other codes in the campaign help upsell the customer with a discount on a second item in the store if they buy it the same day.Since QR codes cost essentially nothing to produce, go create your own and download a reader for your phone while you’re at it from i-nigma. You can create simple promotions like coupons inexpensively and quickly. One caveat is making sure your promotion will appear on customers’ phones as you intend it to, which means hiring someone with mobile design experience if you’re offering anything other than a plain-text promotion.A QR campaign will work best if your audience includes lots of tech-savvy mobile aficionados, but as an early adopter, you may also be able to garner interest from people unaware of the technology. Customers may be curious about the spotted squares, and you may even be able to parlay your new campaign into press about your business’s cutting-edge ad techniques.Video Overlay Ads 5 min readlast_img read more

Would You Buy a Curved Smartphone Samsung Experiments With New Galaxy Round

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Would you want or need a phone with a curved display?Oh yes. It’s easier to hold and will contour to the curves of my face.I’d be willing to give it a try. But I’ll need to test it in-store before spending any money on one.Ha. No. This is just another gimmick.Android? Psshh. I’m Apple, buddy. Forget it.VoteView ResultsCrowdsignal.comWould you want or need a phone with a curved display? Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now If the form factor on your slab-style smartphone simply isn’t cutting it anymore, Samsung is betting that it has exactly what you need. The tech giant has announced the Galaxy Round — what the company says is the first smartphone with a curved display.Why would anyone want or need a phone with a curved display? Samsung says the 5.7-inch screen — which gently bends inward from left to right — “offers a comfortable hand grip feeling to [the] user.”So, it’s about ergonomics. A phone with a slight curve could presumably fit more easily in a person’s hand and therefore reduce the likelihood of it being dropped.Beyond that, we’re not sure what the benefits could be. When asked about it, a Samsung representative simply said this in an email: “We don’t have further details.”Related: How Your Smartphone Can Actually Save You From Working WeekendsThe Round is initially being sold only in Korea for about $1,000 without a contract. The phone might not land in the U.S. for some time.More about the phone: It runs on Samsung’s version of the Android 4.3 (Jelly Bean) operating system. The software that runs on the Galaxy Round makes use of its unique shape with features like the “roll effect” that briefly pops up information such as time and date, messages or missed calls when a user tilts his or her phone to one side or the other. When music is playing, a user can switch between tracks in the same way: left for the last track or right for the next one.With the Multi Window feature, a user can have multiple apps open on the home screen, making it easier to multitask and share information between apps. The Galaxy Round can also be customized with Samsung’s “one-hand operation” feature that let users position the controls they use most frequently on their preferred side of the screen.Like other Galaxy Devices, the Round is Wi-Fi, LTE and NFC capable with BlueTooth and USB 3.0. It features the same 13-megapixel main camera and a front-facing 2-megapixel camera.Related: Turn a Smartphone Into a Virus-Detecting Microscope? Yep. It’s Happening. This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience.center_img 2 min read October 9, 2013 Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

5 Innovative Ways to Automate Your Sales Processes This Year

first_img B2B companies of all sizes have discovered how sales automation programs can make tasks more efficient and effective. However, there’s still room to get additional value out of your pwn investment in sales automation techniques.Related: Automated Webinars May Be the Tool You Need to Scale Your Marketing EffortsHere are several unique ways to expand your automation strategy in 2017, to improve your sales processes for both your customers and sales professionals.Maximize upsell/referral opportunities through post-sale correspondence.B2B-focused organizations can learn a lot from their B2C counterparts: For instance, innovative companies like Amazon are often able to increase their upselling and cross-selling opportunities by employing sophisticated algorithms to recommend additional products for returning customers.It’s a remarkably simple idea, even if it’s based on the analysis of complex data: Find new ways to add value to your customers’ lives while simultaneously encouraging them to buy more. During the first quarter that the system was in place, Amazon reported a 29 percent revenue increase over the same period the year before.What Amazon also discovered, and what B2B organizations can learn as well, is that you can use this data to drive interest even when the customer isn’t browsing your site. If you’ve purchased anything from Amazon recently, you’ve probably noticed that the retail giant also includes item recommendations in the confirmation email you receive following an order.This is a great strategy to drive additional revenue, but you don’t have to use your confirmation and thank-you emails solely for upselling. You can also auto-populate links to various pieces of content, or include product support information that is relevant to each customer’s purchase.Maintain a bird’s-eye view of social media chatter.It’s never been more important to monitor what your customers are saying about their experiences with your company on social media channels. Most B2B buyers belong to multiple social platforms, and they are especially likely to start conversations there if they have a decent number of followers, as it’s a way to encourage the companies they deal with to listen.To turn this phenomenon into a positive for your organization, utilize software that can monitor various social channels and alert sales representatives to opportunities to serve prospects and customers online.Personalize user profiles and customer-maintenance pages.B2B-focused brands are going all-in on personalized sales strategies, as data suggests that some organizations are increasing conversion rates by up to 36 percent simply by employing personalized content throughout the sales funnel. But while many sales leaders see the benefits of big-picture personalization in B2B sales, they often forget that delivering a personalized experience is just as much about the small touches.When a prospect or customer creates a profile on your website, make sure that it is immediately populated with information that is relevant specifically to that person’s experience. This should include basics like the person’s name and company info, but also should be extended to incorporate product recommendations, support materials, content and order history.Automate coaching activities to boost your mid-range performersSales automation isn’t beneficial just when it’s used to directly improve the experience your customers have. You can also use the same principles to help motivate and coach your sales reps, and encourage them to reach new heights.Related: 10 Marketing Automation Hacks All Businesses Should Be UsingContemporary software solutions make it easy for you to record and analyze the specific habits of your highest-performing sales reps, and then replicate those techniques with other team members in your organization. This robust data analysis can also help you devise new strategies for optimizing your reward structure for each individual rep across various stages of the sales process.Incorporate chatbots in value-added ways.Don’t worry, though; they’re coming to assist salespeople, rather than replace them. Obviously, there are many interactions with a customer where AI alone is insufficient, but that also means there are some instances where it’s perfectly adequate.Many times, customers come to a website looking for a quick answer to a simple question. Chatbots can help direct them to a particular section in the FAQ, or help pull up a piece of content that can illuminate an issue for them. When these kinds of interactions are handled by automation, it frees up sales reps to focus more on core activities related to sales and CRM.Related: Why Sales Cannot be Automated in the Next 5 Years in FMCG IndustryObviously, there are many interactions with a customer where AI alone is insufficient, but also some where it’s perfectly adequate. Listen Now Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 4 min read April 14, 2017 Hear from business owners and CEOs who went through a crippling business problem and came out the other side bigger and stronger. Problem Solvers with Jason Feiferlast_img read more

AIMP 45 music player released

first_imgAIMP 4.5 music player released by Martin Brinkmann on October 31, 2017 in Music and Video – 43 commentsAIMP is a popular music player that looks and behaves in many regards as Winamp, one of the most popular music players of all times for Windows.AIMP 4.5 was released on October 30, 2017, and it is a new major update for the music player. The previous stable version, AIMP 4.13 was released in February of 2017, and work began on the new version of the player right after the release of that version in February.First the basics: AIMP 4.5 is available for download on the official website. It supports all versions of Windows starting with Windows Vista, and may be installed on the system or used as a portable player (the choice is displayed during setup).The new version of the music player introduces new features and improvements to existing ones. Windows users with 4K monitors and users who use a setup with multiple monitors that use different DPI will benefit from the update for instance. AIMP 4.5 supports 4K monitors and monitors with different DPI so that display issues should be a thing of the past after the installation of the new version.The player engine received several improvements as well. The player includes decoders for WebM and Matroska audio formats, support for MKA, AA3, AT3, OMA and Youtube file formats, and support for LRC and SRT lyrics file formats.Several playback improvements have been implemented as well. AIMP 4.5 users find new “restore playback position for each playlist”, “jump 5 seconds back on start if playback is paused for more than 15 seconds”, and “jump to next track on deleting playing file from playlist” optionsYou find all three options under Preferences > Player > Automatic. None are enabled by default; the first two are listed in the common section, the last in the “on deleting playing file” menu.The program’s built-in tag editor for audio tags can be used to download lyrics from the Internet in AIMP 4.5.  This requires additional plugins, but may make things a lot easier for users who use the tag editing capabilities of AIMP.The development team added new tag fields to the tag editor as well: it supports lyricist, mood, conductor, catalog, compilation, ISRC, rating and encoder tags now.AIMP 4.5’s audio decoder has two new options as well. While there have not been any changes to the actual conversion process, users of the player may configure it to terminate the program after the conversion, and to show statistics of the conversion job.The media player’s music library is the last big feature that has been improved in the new AIMP version. It comes with a new database engine that improves performance significantly — the developers state it improves performance by the factor 10.The player supports the new tag fields that were added to the tag editor, and it comes with a couple of smaller options like the option to customize list of fields for grouping, or to reset the stats of selected files.Closing WordsAIMP 4.5 is a well designed media player for Windows that comes with a lot of features in a small package. The new version improves the player further without taking away any functionality.Summary12345 Author Rating3 based on 18 votes Software Name AIMP 4.5Operating System WindowsSoftware Category MultimediaLanding Page http://www.aimp.ru/ Advertisementlast_img read more

Google Chrome 66 password export autoplay blocker and security updates

first_imgGoogle Chrome 66: password export, autoplay blocker, and security updates by Martin Brinkmann on April 18, 2018 in Google Chrome – 23 commentsGoogle started the rollout of Google Chrome 66 for all supported platforms today. The new version of the web browser re-introduces a functional password exporter, comes with video autoplay blocking functionality, and security fixes among other changes.Google is pretty tight-lipped about Chrome releases and Chrome 66 does not change that at all. The official blog post on the Chrome Releases website reveals only some of the changes that went into the new browser version.The announcement reveals the third-party reported security issues that were fixed in Chrome 66, and that a site isolation trial is run on a small subset of Chrome users.Google Chrome users who don’t want to participate in the trial may load chrome://flags#site-isolation-trial-opt-out  to opt-out of the trial by selecting opt-out (not recommended) as the default status.Chrome users who are interested in the feature may visit the test site mentioned on this Chromium page to find out if Site Isolation is active in the browser.Chrome 66 requires at least Mac OS X 10.10; Chrome 65 was the last version of the web browser that supported Mac OS X 10.9.Google does publish a changelog for Chrome releases but it is quite long and technical, and it will take hours to go through all of it.One of the new features in Chrome 66 is better handling of autoplaying video with sound. Basically, what Chrome does is block video on (most) sites if audio is enabled. This should take care of autoplaying video ads with sound and other autoplaying videos with sound on sites.When Chrome encounters an autoplaying video with audio on a site, it blocks the video from playing but the browser won’t interfere with autoplaying video without sound.There are exceptions to the rule and the main rule that Chrome uses to determine whether to play video with sound or not is based on a site’s Media Engagement Index.Basically, if you interacted with the site or played media on it previously, video with sound may still autoplay.Google’s initial plan was to release video with sound autoplay blocking in Chrome 64, but the functionality was postponed.You may load chrome://media-engagement/ in the Chrome browser to display the score of each site you visited.Most users won’t notice a difference on sites that play media with sound automatically if they interact with the site regularly. The change affects site new sites originally for the most part that play media with sound automatically.Tip: check out these guides for additional information on controlling video and audio playback in Chrome:The complete Google Chrome audio muting guideHow to control audio and video autoplay in Google ChromeGoogle re-introduced the option to export passwords in Chrome 66.Here is how you export all saved passwords in Chrome 66 or newer:Load chrome://settings/passwords.Click on the menu next to “saved passwords”.Select export passwords.Select “export passwords” again when the prompt appears. Chrome warns you that saved passwords are not encrypted and thus visible to anyone with access to the exported file.You are asked to type your Windows username and password to confirm the exporting.Select a location to save the file Chrome Passwords.csv to.Google announced that the update to Chrome 66 will roll out in the coming days and weeks. Desktop users, at least, can load chrome://settings/help to run a manual check for updates. Chrome 66 should get picked up during the check.SummaryArticle NameGoogle Chrome 66: password export, autoplay blocker, and security updatesDescriptionGoogle started the rollout of Google Chrome 66 for all supported platforms today. The new version of the web browser re-introduces a functional password exporter, comes with video autoplay blocking functionality, and security fixes among other changes.Author Martin BrinkmannPublisher Ghacks Technology NewsLogo Advertisementlast_img read more

This Is Your Brain on Mixed Martial Arts

first_img(Credit: Shutterstock)Michael Bisping has fought professionally in mixed martial arts since 2004. Last year, the journeyman won his first title. He knocked out Luke Rockhold in the first round to win the middleweight belt in the Ultimate Fighting Championship, or UFC, the most popular of several MMA organizations.On Nov. 4 of this year, at age 38, Bisping defended his title for a second time. His opponent was the Canadian Georges St. Pierre, a former UFC champ. The fight, held in New York’s Madison Square Garden, was close until the third round, when a series of blows knocked Bisping to the canvas. Pierre pounced on the fallen fighter and applied a rear-naked choke, cutting off oxygen to Bisping’s brain. His body went limp.On Nov. 25, within weeks of going limp, Bisping was in the octagon again. This time 7,000 miles away in Shanghai, China. He had volunteered to fight a young up-and-comer after the original opponent, Anderson Silva, was pulled from the card following a failed drug test. It was no contest. Bisping got knocked out in the first round.Three weeks. Two brutal fights.These days, with more science available on brain injuries in sports (especially CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy), the National Football League, National Hockey League and other organizations are doing more to protect athletes. Executives are making rules changes, establishing more stringent health checkups, and some groups have introduced improved headgear.The most well-known combat sport organization, the National Boxing Association, is no angel; allegations of corruption have plagued it for decades, and it’s not known for putting a fighter’s health first. Still, it’s hard to imagine one of its former and high-profile champions being allowed to fight three weeks after a violent loss, as Bisping did in the UFC.But this is mixed martial arts, a 25-year-old combat sport that has become a multi-billion-dollar industry — but still has its share of growing pains.A comprehensive review published this month in the journal Trauma suggests that MMA organizations are lax when it comes to monitoring the health of its fighters. And because the organizations don’t consistently track injuries to the combatants, the rate and risk of injuries remain largely unknown, the reviewers say.This is all the more concerning because many adolescents and teenagers are taking up the sport without fully knowing the long-term cognitive risks.Lots of Head BlowsThe researchers for the Trauma report looked at 18 studies involving 7,587 fighters from 1990 to 2016. Some of the studies indicated that nearly half of MMA fights ended due to head blows, though other studies offered a lower percentage, one putting it at 28 percent. Another study found only 13 percent of fighters sought or were given medical attention for concussive symptoms from blows delivered either in training or during matches. And more than half of those fighters returned to training within two days.Of the limited neurological tests done on fighters, the results are sobering.“Five studies measured degenerative neuroanatomical and cognitive changes associated with repetitive blunt head trauma sustained in combat sports,” the reviewers say. “Participants were found to have microstructural brain damage when compared to controls in all five studies. Additionally, one set of studies found fighters with more lifetime bouts tended to have lower cognitive test scores, processing speed, and increased signs of motor impulsiveness.”MMA health studies also tend to lack a clear definition of a concussion. Several studies equated a knockout to a concussion, and one used the Military Acute Concussion Evaluation as its concussion definition, the reviewers say.None of the studies outlined a head injury protocol, or return-to-activity guidelines. There were also no discussions of minimizing traumatic brain injuries, such as by restricting blows to the head, introducing mandatory head protection or developing better padded gloves.Joel Lockwood, an emergency physician at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, Canada, and a co-author of the review, said in a news release that MMA fighters likely face long-term neurological consequences from repetitive head injuries. The danger “is unlikely to change without increased medical oversight and regulation, including accurate and consistent head injury assessment and diagnosis by trained medical professionals.”Shanghai AmnesiaMMA podcasts, typically hosted by former MMA male fighters, are full of bluster, expletives and the worship of toughness. During one in November, UFC light heavyweight champ Daniel Cormier called Bisping’s quick return to the octagon “a gangsta move” — a show of toughness and grit.Yet studies show that, as fighters age into their 30s, they can’t take punches like they used to; repeated punches over years degrade the brain’s ability to recover. A 2012 report found that UFC fighters between the ages of 36 and 40 were getting knocked out more often than fighters in younger age groups. It’s also common knowledge that, after taking a pounding in the ring or octagon, a fighter needs time off to mentally and physically recuperate.And MMA fighters do take a pounding. A 2014 study concluded that rates of getting knocked out or having a referee stop a fight (TKO) are higher in MMA than in any other combat sport. And over the last decade, three fighters have died as a result of injuries in the octagon, two from head blows, according to the Trauma review.Some MMA analysts have shown awareness about the damage inflicted. Former UFC fighter Brendan Shaub, who hosts a podcast, expressed concern for Bisping during a show in November in the run-up to the Shanghai fight. “What I don’t like about it is that it’s 21 days since Michael Bisping just got choked out, KO’d – let’s be honest, what put him on the ground was a left hook.”Even so, after Bisping was knocked out within minutes, no podcaster I heard talked honestly about the sport’s health realities. Dana White, the face of the UFC, has not spoken publicly about the issues surrounding the Bisping fight. The talk in MMA circles has moved on to the next card, as though the contest in Shanghai never happened.last_img read more

6 VPNs that can help you break through Chinas Great Firewall

first_imgPandaPow — Best easy-to-use China-centric VPN The Great Wall of China was originally built to keep barbarians out, and now the Great Firewall of China strives to do the same kind of thing in our digital era. Allowing the Chinese government to block access to foreign websites and slow down cross-border internet traffic, the Great Firewall is the largest system of censorship in the world. But if you’re traveling to the vast country, you can circumvent it using a virtual private network, or VPN. Take it from us: You don’t have to get blocked in China.While using a VPN in China is technically legal, providers play a game of cat-and-mouse with the authorities, which periodically crack down and try to block servers and throttle bandwidth, much to the annoyance of internet users. For example, a VPN ban reportedly came into effect in March, but nothing seems to have happened on the face of it at least, with providers being kept in the dark about if and when the ban will be rolled out.Users in China may have to swap VPNs if theirs becomes blocked, but having one is a necessity for anyone wanting unfettered access to foreign websites, from news sites to social media and Google. If you’re on vacation in China you’ll need a VPN for posting snaps to Instagram and keeping in touch with friends using Whatsapp. This is because VPNs assign a virtual IP address to obscure your real location from others, enabling you to circumnavigate geo-blocking and censorship measures as if you are based somewhere without them. VPNs also encrypt data, leaving your computer or device to make it impossible for others to see what you’re downloading, which is useful in a country where surveillance is a top priority for the authorities.The first thing to know about VPNs in China is that it’s easier to install one before you arrive, but how do you choose? Lots of servers (in China if possible), high speeds and extra layers of security are all important things to look for in a VPN offering. Reliable, 24/7 customer service is also an important consideration, because if you experience technical difficulties while you’re there, the fastest service available isn’t much use to you if you can’t troubleshoot.PureVPN — Best for servers in China and speed Image: purevpnPureVPN operates from Hong Kong and four of its 750+ servers are based in China itself, which is quite rare. This makes for some speedy connections while doing your part to battle the Chinese goverment. The VPN also offers its users unlimited bandwidth and five simultaneous connections. There are a whole bunch of security options, including industry standard 256-bit encryption, support for pretty much all protocols, built-in ad and malware blocking, DNS and IPv6 leak protection, and a kill switch. PureVPN has a self-managed network so your data is handled by PureVPN only, without the intervention or interference of any third-parties. There is also the option to use a NAT Firewall add-on, which provides an added layer of security by safeguarding a user’s device from hackers exploiting loopholes. The company claims to have a zero logging policy, although in 2017, a user was arrested partially due to session logs held by the VPN. This practice isn’t unusual, but may put some people off, particularly in a country where there is believed to be a lot of surveillance. There are lots of extra features with PureVPN, including split tunneling so users can decide which traffic is funneled through their VPN, unlimited server switching and data transfer, plus the ability to create a Wi-Fi VPN hotspot.When it comes to troubleshooting worries, PureVPN has live chat support for customers open every hour of the day, as well as ticket and email support. As with other offerings, there are apps for Mac OS, Windows, Android, and iOS devices and the company claims its product is easy to set up on gaming consoles and smart TVs too. Customers can pay for their subscriptions using an array of options, including Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. The best-value subscription costs just $2.88/month for two years, but the seven-day money-back guarantee has terms and conditions attached. ExpressVPN — Best all-around VPN for China Image: tunnelbearWhen it comes to free VPNs some experts are skeptical, but for those looking to save money on their travels, there’s TunnelBear. The Canada-based VPN is packed with features and has a sense of humour with a strong bear-theme running through its programs. For example, to connect to the VPN users choose a country and then another to connect to and watch a bear tunnel there when the connection is secure.There are apps for Mac, Windows, iOS, and Chrome and support for five simultaneous connections for premium accounts. When it comes to security, TunnelBear uses strong AES 256-bit encryption by default, the same level of encryption as many expensive services. There is also a feature called “VigilantBear,” a kill switch that blocks all unsecured traffic when you lose your Wi-Fi connection, until a device has safely reconnected again. “GhostBear” or stealth mode is another handy feature — particularly in China — which makes a user’s VPN-encrypted data less detectable to governments, businesses, and ISPs. It disguises OpenVPN traffic to help people get around firewalls by using obfsproxy, but can take a toll on speeds.The VPN has servers in 20 countries, but one downside is that not all of them are available to non-fee-paying customers, meaning potentially slower speeds. It’s doesn’t allow P2P torrenting, so users of BitTorrent should look elsewhere. Unlike many other VPNs TunnelBear doesn’t have a no logging policy, but instead keeps minimal logs for one month in order to comply with Canadian law, which could worry some users.TunnelBear has three types of subscriptions: Little Bear is free and gives users 500MB of data/month, while Giant offers unlimited data for $9.99/month on a monthly basis and Grizzly offers the same for $5/month based on a user signing up for a year. Image: bufferedLots of VPNs offer live chat support, but Buffered goes a little further. The Hungarian VPN offers round-the-clock technical support as well as a 30-day refund policy, which is a great way for users to check that they are happy with the service and a relatively unusual feature among VPNs.The VPN claims to offer high speed connections and has servers in Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan, as well as China itself. It also offers unlimited bandwidth with no download restrictions, which is ideal for fans of torrenting in China.Expats have reported the VPN works fine for accessing geo-blocked streaming services as well as popular foreign websites, but some people have found they are unable to access Netflix.Buffered offers military-grade encryption, a kill switch, and a no logging policy (aside from connections) when it comes to security, but while its plans and security measures are easy to understand, some users may be put off by a lack of apps for their devices. While the VPN provides detailed set-up instructions and the process is said to be fairly simple, it offers no apps for iOS, unlike most of its competitors. The subscription is also not the cheapest at $12.99/month or $7.62 for a “13 month special.” Image: nordvpnWhile China tends to focus its crackdowns on VPN providers, security and privacy is important to VPN users too. NordVPN has some neat security features, including shared IP addresses. Its Mac client uses Next Generation Encryption (NGE) IKEv2/IPsec as standard and 256bit-GCM for encryption, which is used by the military. There is also the option to use “Onion over VPN” or Double VPN servers, which means data is passed through two separate VPN servers instead of one. For users in China this means traffic can be re-routed to Taiwan, then travel through a server in Hong Kong before reaching its destination, which does take a toll on speed.NordVPN doesn’t keep logs of online activity. This means that your private data, online activity and browsing history can’t be monitored, gathered, exposed, or intercepted by third parties. Users can also select DNS leak protection to protect their IP address and an automatic kill switch, which either kills all programs or chosen programs if the VPN connection drops. This protects a user’s personal data from being temporarily exposed. There’s also ad-blocking functionality and protection against phishing threats.Users can link up to six devices simultaneously to NordVPN’s servers using apps for Mac OS, Windows, iOS, and Android. The service also boasts unlimited bandwidth for torrenting, decent download speed, and a 24/7 live chat tool for support. Expats have reported they have successfully used NordVPN to unblock geo-locked services including Netflix US, BBC iPlayer, and Amazon Prime Video, making it a popular choice for travelers wanting to keep up with the latest films and TV shows while in China.NordVPN may have 3,000 servers around the world, but one downside is that none of them are in China, meaning users in the country face speed penalties as internet traffic has further to travel. Nearby servers are located in Taiwan, South Korea, and Hong Kong. Another downside is that NordVPN’s monthly plan is relatively expensive, at $11.95/month. But the price drops significantly to $3.29/month as part of a two-year subscription. TunnelBear — Best free option Image: purevpn Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission.Image: Bob Al-Greene / Mashable IllustrationBy Sarah GriffithsMashable Deals2018-06-01 21:53:53 UTC Image: pandapow Image: pandapowAs its name suggests, Hong Kong-based PandaPow is designed to pack a punch in China, with decent speeds and security. But its biggest selling point is its simplicity.The self-dubbed “hassle-free VPN service” boasts instant activation with users able to get started in minutes thanks to a one-click set-up. While this may be a bit of an exaggeration, setting up the VPN is reportedly very easy. There is software for Mac, Windows, Android, and iOS accompanied with straightforward set-up guides. PandaPow is perhaps best known for its router/Wi-Fi set up, which is handy for anyone staying in the country for a while.The company also offers unlimited speeds, bandwidth and speed test usage, and unlimited server switches between 120+ servers in 16 countries. There’s also a filter feature in PandaPow Wi-Fi, which allows you to exclude or include the internet traffic traveling through the VPN connection, a feature typically seen in more expensive VPN offerings. When it comes to security, PandaPow does not log browser activity and reportedly offers strong encryption, but the details are a little vague. Some users have reported that sometimes when a VPN connection fails, which is common in China, the VPN doesn’t automatically resume, which could pose a security risk.PandaPow offers a number of plans, but its classic option costs $9/month on a monthly basis, or $84 for a year. They all come with a seven-day money back guarantee, which is really handy if the service isn’t right for your needs. Image: nordvpn NordVPN — Best for innovative security Image: tunnelbear Buffered — Best customer service and refund policy Image: expressvpn Image: expressvpnExpressVPN has a great mix of security, reliability, speed, and customer service, making it ideal for use in China.China’s Great Firewall is sophisticated enough to block basic OpenVPN connections, but Express VPN’ can circumnavigate the wall, with users reporting fast speeds, especially if they connect to Hong Kong, Los Angeles, or some other US servers which are said to be optimized for users in China. The service automatically finds the fastest server for you.Expats say the VPN works well to watch geo-blocked content from Netflix and YouTube, as well as other popular foreign streaming services. Users can enjoy unlimited bandwidth and they can connect to three devices simultaneously if they want.In a country where there’s censorship, security may seem particularly important. Express VPN boasts strong 256-bit AES encryption and support for lots of VPN protocols. The company offers a strict no logging policy and there’s a handy kill-switch, DNS/IPv6 leak protection, and a split tunneling feature for Mac and Windows, which allows users to protect their torrent client only. There’s also TOR compatibility.Customer service-wise, ExpressVPN offers 24/7 customer support and a bunch of apps for Windows, Mac, Android, iOS, and Linux to make life easier for users. Expats are particularly complimentary The downside is that it’s a little more expensive than its competitors. A one-month subscription costs $12.95, but there’s currently a deal for $6.67/month if you sign up for 15 months. There’s no free trial period, but there is a 30-day money back guarantee.  Image: bufferedlast_img read more

People Power hundreds hit Philippines streets to fight for LGBTI equality

first_img‘It was also to show our collective voice and call out senators, institutions and groups who are delaying the passage of the SOGIE equality bill.’“While I may be #TeamShangela, I don’t get angry and release my frustrations at @trixiemattel because as members of the LGBTQ+ community; we should be supporting each other and making our voices heard in support of the SOGIE EQUALITY BILL.” #EqualityNOW pic.twitter.com/DF2iiS6tpa— Matteo (@matteopelayo) March 19, 2018Organizers also wanted the rally to make people aware about the constant delays the bill faces in the Senate.‘We want the community to engage the decision makers with their stories of discrimination and violence,’ Marasigan said.‘The non passage would only lead to more violence, discrimination, sexism, and lost opportunities for everyone especially for LGBT people.’Uphill battleGeraldine Roman, the Philippines first trans congress woman, introduced the bill into Congress last year. The bill received a unanimous 197-0 vote in favor of passing the anti-discrimination measures.Our favorite signs from the #EqualityNow rally at the People Power Monument. #SOGIEBill pic.twitter.com/TlqqinTbyu— Preen.ph (@preenonline) March 17, 2018But now the bill faces an uphill battle in the Senate before it can become official law.Political observers believe the bill would struggle to get the numbers in the Senate. But observers have also accused some senators including former boxer, Manny Paquiao of engaging in delaying tactics to prevent a vote on the bill.Dear Senators… we are already impatient, agitated & almost furious. If u dont pass the SOGIE Equality Bill we will make sure that your denial of our rights will be written down in history & younger generations of LGBT will abhore you. #EqualityNow #Philippines pic.twitter.com/9RQCocjMoP— Ryan Silverio (@queeringryan) March 19, 2018 LOOK: Members and supporters of the LGBTQ rally for SOGIE Equality Bill | @TriciahTerada pic.twitter.com/Xe3qaqJmhi— CNN Philippines (@cnnphilippines) March 17, 2018 Hundreds of people turned up to a rally in the Philippines to call for a LGBTI rights bill to become law. Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Protestors congregated at the People Power Monument in Quezon City to encourage national senators to vote in favor of the SOGIE Equality Bill.The SOGIE Equality Bill would make it illegal to discriminate against people because of their sexual orientation and gender identity expression (SOGIE).Feels good to be surrounded by people who will fight for your rights #EqualityNOW pic.twitter.com/bewxeExjfn— Punong Babaylan #EqualityNOW (@vinceliban) March 17, 2018The People Power Monument pays tribute to the country’s 1986 People Power revolution. It was a series of massive demonstrations to protest regime violence and electoral fraud.‘[We chose] the People Power Monument, because this is a struggle of everyone LGBT and non LGBT,’ one of the rally organizers, Tacing Marasigan told Gay Star News.‘People power includes the the marginalized sectors such as the LGBT.’The Lagablab Network of around 25 LGBTI organizations put Saturday’s (March 17) rally together. #EqualityNOW #PassSOGIEEqualityBill #PassADB pic.twitter.com/0w2qCJgjKR— white wolf* (@caspdf) March 17, 2018Some of the discriminatory acts which would become illegal under the SOGIE Equality Act include; denial of access to public services, hiring and dismissal in the workplace, access to education or expulsion of students, harassment by law enforcement and outing someone without consent.I am Louise, a Filipina lesbian, & I need #EqualityNOW. I want safer spaces & equal rights + opportunities for myself and all my LGBTQIA+ brothers and sisters. pic.twitter.com/fY4JuBAaOv— Louise Meets (@louisemeets) March 17, 2018Punishment for breaking the law would include a fine of between P100,000 to P500,000 (US$1958 to US$9793) or imprisonment between one and six years.Fighting for our rights together #PassSOGIEEqualityBill #FightForEquality #EqualityNOW pic.twitter.com/yfd4OWAIYZ— #PassSogieEqualityBillNow (@Rynbmnj) March 18, 2018People PowerRally organizers said they organized the event to raise awareness of how important the bill is to the LGBTI community.‘The main objective was to rally people – LGBTI people and their allies – to pressure the Senate to act on the bill,’ said Tacing Marasigan.center_img Two more cities in the Philippines are protecting LGBTI from discriminationChristian groups ‘ambush’ Senate to protest LGBTI anti-discrimination billPhilippine lawmaker seeks probe after bar discriminates LGBTI comedianRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/people-power-hundreds-hit-philippines-streets-to-fight-for-lgbti-equality/ Some of the many protestors at the SOGIE Equality Bill rally in Quezon City. | Photo: Twitter/@tomasinoweb eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) GAYSTARNEWS-last_img read more

This burly bear couple have designs on your home

first_imgDesign duo Roger + Chris are going from strength to strength. The husbands design products for the home – with sturdy sofas and lamps among their best-selling products.Roger Hazard is a native Texan. He started his own design and renovation business after attending Texas A&M university. This led him to New York, where he broke into TV courtesy of the reality show Sell The House and A&E. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Husband Chris Stout-Hazard heralds originally from Nebraska. He worked as a technology executive in several finance companies, relocating to Austin to partner in a new start-up business.Chris and Roger married in 2011 (Photo: Roger + Chris)Meeting and marrying‘We met on Facebook, crazily enough,’ Chris tells GSN. ‘We started texting back and forth before eventually working up the nerve to talk on the phone.’At the time the men lived in different cities. Roger was in New York and traveling to film his TV show.‘We talked for hours and hours over months before even meeting in person, which made that initial meeting simultaneously less stressful and more exciting. We were a fit right away.’The men married in Iowa in August 2011 surrounded by friends and family. They renovated homes for themselves in Austin, Texas, Sharon Springs, New York, Montclair, New Jersey and Omaha. Their latest renovation is in Nebraska, where they now live.The Roger + Chris Atticus sofa (Photo: Roger + Chris)The launched their own company, simply called Roger + Chris, in 2012, to sell their own home furnishing designs. It’s proved successful that they’ve recently opened their own dedicated factory in North Carolina.They also do design work/consultations for residential and commercial projects. They both appeared on screen together on the show Roger That, but are currently dedicating themselves fully to their business.Roger + Chris blue velvet Lincoln sofa (Photo: Roger + Chris)‘Seeing a concept come to life is really exciting’What part of their work do they enjoy the most?‘Seeing a concept come to life is really exciting,’ says Roger. ‘We are very fortunate to work with such an amazing team of craftsmen. It takes most furniture brands close to two years to take an idea and see it actually built and available for purchase. We are able to do this in a matter of months. With feedback from our customers we can tweak pieces to fit their needs.Roger + Chris pendant light (Photo: @rogerandchris | Instagram)‘I don’t think there’s anyone else in the trade that can do this on the same scale as we do.’‘It’s challenging and exciting to build something from scratch,’ adds Chris.‘Establishing what our company stands for, our style, how we function – it’s a million little questions that need to be answered. But in the end it feels like you have a chance to be a part of something unique.’‘There is more than one “right way” to design a home’Are people wary of inviting the pair over to their home in case they cast a critical eye over it? Are there any interior design touches that they hate or immediately want to change?‘We’ve been told that friends are nervous to invite us over to their homes for fear that we’re going to run through critiquing everything, but that isn’t the case!’ says Chris.Roger + Chris bed (Photo: @rogerandchris | Instagram)‘There are certainly things you see over and over again that might have worn out their welcome. They vary by nation and region – particularly in the US, trends roll their way across the country, so what may already be played out in New York is still going strong in Nebraska. We are still seeing a lot of “Live, Laugh, Love” wall art, for instance.‘Our take on design is this: If the style and arrangement of your home works for you, then it’s perfect. Too many people get wrapped up in making choices to please others or copy what they see on TV design shows, but that may not be right for your house.‘There are certainly mistakes out there, but there is more than one “right way” to design a home.’Home makeover on a budgetThe pair are keen to stress that giving your home a fresh look doesn’t necessarily have to cost a lot of money. eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us .center_img ‘One of the most high-impact changes you can make to a room is the least expensive – paint,’ says Chris.‘For less than $100 and a few hours of time, you can totally change the feel of a room by adding a new color. There is a lot you can accomplish with inexpensive tweaks – vintage furniture, homemade drapes, found artwork.Roger + Chris chair and sofa design (@rogerandchris | Instagram)‘It’s tempting to redo an entire house top-to-bottom at once, but that’s simply impossible for most of us.‘Starting with color and gradually changing out furniture and decor as time and budget allow may not make for a dramatic, instant transformation, but it does allow you time to carefully consider your choices and adjust as you go along.’Producing in the United StatesThe Roger + Chris range often pays a nod to the past: classic Chesterfield-style sofas and vintage-inspired lamps are a staple.Roger says he finds it impossible to choose a favorite product (‘I think all of products are top drawer. It would be easier to say which brand of ice cream is my favorite.’)Chris highlights Harley: ‘It’s a channel-tufted sofa range that is distinctive and works really well for a lot of our customers. It’s been a hit so far and I think it’ll keep getting more popular with time.’Both are passionate about producing their items in the US.Roger + Chris: Proud of producing their designs in the US (Photo: Roger + Chris)‘For us, it’s less about patriotism or boosting American manufacturing – which is important, of course – than maintaining greater control over the content of our products and working more directly with the team building the furniture.’‘We talk daily and can quickly develop new styles, make durability improvements, and ensure our customers are getting exactly what they need.’‘As far as overt homophobia, it’s shown up more in business than day-to-day life’As a high-profile same-sex couple, who work closely together and have a public profile, I wondered if they have ever been on the receiving end of any homophobia – particularly in Texas or Nebraska?‘We’re really fortunate in that, for the most part, people on a one-on-one basis have been cool about it. While we’re in a more progressive part of Nebraska, it’s still a little old-fashioned,’ says Chris.Husbands Chris and Roger (Photo: @stouthazard | Instagram)‘Some folks may not have a lot of interaction with married gay couples. I don’t know that we’re doing anything particularly courageous, but I suppose any increased visibility can help change attitudes. So we do make a point of referring to each other as “husband” and not playing coy about it.‘As far as overt homophobia, it’s shown up more in business than day-to-day life, surprisingly. We were previously in partnership with a business owned by a couple of men who clearly underestimated our capabilities, in part because we were a gay couple.‘You know the type – assuming that because we’re gay, we’re only able to “making things pretty” and that we couldn’t possibly be serious business people. After that relationship ended, we started our own factory. Our partners in our new factory are another gay couple who’ve dealt with the same challenges, so it feels slightly poetic.’Roger + Chris interior design (Photo: Roger + Chris)Finally, if they could offer one simple piece of advice to anyone thinking about improving their home, what would it be?‘Don’t take it too seriously. While home improvements can make for a big project, try to enjoy yourself. Don’t let the stress get to you. Have fun, remember that it’s your home and you’re the one who has to love it, and pace yourself.’Chris Stout-Hazard at home one a Roger + Chris sofa (Photo: Roger + Chris) GAYSTARNEWS- Pink Singapore: Home Affair minister K Shanmugam addresses sexual orientationLGBT Tourism is a $211 billion annual travel industry: LGBT Masterclass at WTM LondonPuerto Vallarta Tourism Chief: Visit to become one of us, you will be safe!Read the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/roger-chris-couple-designs-home/last_img read more

Gay fan proudly waves rainbow flag during RussiaSaudi match

first_imgRussia’s first World Cup match against Saudi Arabia | Photo: Facebook/FIFA World CupRussia scored five goals against fellow LGBT+ intolerant and major oil producing nation, Saudi Arabia, in all. So there were was a lot of waving.Alexander Agapov is president of the Russian LGBT Sport Federation and also a big fan of his country’s soccer team.Rainbow flag waved during Putin opening addressThe flag got its first outing at Moscow’s Luzhniki Stadium when Russian president Vladimir Putin was giving his opening speech.Agapov waves rainbow flag during Putin speech. Photo: TwitterOnce the first match of the tournament got underway, Agapov was poised and ready to go again.‘I believe you should practice what you preach and, if I’m telling LGBT football fans to be visible, then I should do it myself,’ Agapov told The Associated Press. A Russian football fan gave the Russia World Cup that extra touch of colour last night as he waved a large rainbow flag every time his beloved team scored a goal. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) Gay fan waved flag for every Russian goal. Photo: Farecenter_img GAYSTARNEWS- Read the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/gay-fan-proudly-waves-rainbow-flag-during-russia-saudi-match/ ‘Each time the Russian team scored a goal I was waving the rainbow flag… I was showing my support.’Russian officials have said that there are no restrictions on fans bringing rainbow flags into stadiums. Agapov said no-one bothered him at the game for waving the flag, but said that a fan outside the stadium told him, I don’t want that kind of world.’While Agapov’s rainbow coloured support of his team passed without incident, LGBT fans could face the risk of random attacks by thugs during the tournament.The rainbow colours will be out again when England meets Tunisia in Volgograd next Monday. LGBT England supporters plan to fly ‘3 Lions Pride’ flag at every England game at World Cup. The new group is part of Pride in Football alliance.Russia’s hosting of the FIFA World Cup has been surrounded by LGBT+ issues. Human rights and LGBT+ campaigner, Peter Tatchell was arrested in Moscow ahead of Thursday’s opening ceremony.Thugs in St Petersburg attacked a gay Frenchman, who was left with serious brain injuries earlier this week. And Swedish fashion brand Björn Borg used augmented reality technology to hide an LGBT+ message in plain sight during the opening match.Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us .last_img read more

Twothirds of black LGBT people face racism within LGBT community

first_imgGAYSTARNEWS- eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… UK Black Pride is this Sunday and this is why it mattersIcons in LGBTI history and today share their pivotal stories in 29 portraitsGreater Fort Lauderdale celebrates NYC Pride Week with Pride Place activationRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/black-lgbt-people-face-racism-community/ Almost two-thirds of black people who identify as LGBT say they face racism from within the LGBT community.center_img Kasim, 25, agreed: ‘Walking into gay bars and drag queens are making jokes directed at me because I’m black on more than one occasion is pretty unwelcoming. Then shrugging it off by saying “I’m not racist, I have a color TV.”‘Abebi, 34, also said: ‘In an LGBT bar, on more than one occasion, drunk people have come over to pet my hair and ask inappropriate questions regarding my race.’The research also found one in eight (12%) LGBT people of faith have experienced discrimination and poor treatment from within the LGBT community because of their faith.As part of Stonewall’s series on being LGBT in Britain, this report highlights the community. It also highlights some shocking statistics of acceptance within the family and home.The report found three in 10 bisexual men (30%) and almost one in 10 bisexual women (8%) say they cannot be open about their sexual orientation with any of their friends, compared to 2% of gay men and 1% of lesbians.With family, only half of lesbian, gay and bi people (46%) and trans people (47%) feel able to be open about their sexual orientation or gender identity at home.Stonewall also have reports focusing on being trans in Britain as well as discrimination and hate crime.They recently released a report, which concluded a third of bisexual students in the UK say they’re bullied for their sexuality.Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . Gay couple hold hands on beach. | Nathan Rupert / Flickr According to new research by UK charity Stonewall, 51% of black and minority ethnic LGBT people said they have faced discrimination based on their race from within the queer community.This number jumps to 61% when broken down to just black people.The research is based on YouGov polling of over 5,000 LGBT people.Photo: Elmo Love / FlickrRuth Hunt, Chief Executive of Stonewall UK, said: ‘This research gives a worrying insight into just how serious a problem prejudice is within our community, and we need to talk about it.‘Users of dating apps will be familiar with phrases like “No blacks, no Asians” and “No chocolate, no curry, no rice, no spice”.’‘This is unacceptable and it causes damage and mistrust,’ she added.‘I’m not racist, I have a color TV’‘Casual racism is common place in LGBT bars and clubs,’ Dalia, 32, said as part of the report.last_img read more

Police find more human remains in gay serial killer investigation

first_imgShare this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Bruce McArthur has been charged with eight counts of first-degree murder (Photo: Facebook) GAYSTARNEWS- Alleged gay serial killer Bruce McArthur charged with sixth murderDo the police take the disappearances of gay men seriously enough?Cops allegedly found man restrained in suspected Toronto serial killer’s apartmentRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/police-more-remains-serial-killer/ The latest remains were located in a forest ravine behind a property at which McArthur, a landscape gardener, stored equipment. It’s the same property at which the remains of seven of his suspected victims were previously discovered in planters.This is the first time police have found remains not buried in planters. They cannot yet say if the remains belong to victims already identified.McArthur arrested last winterMcArthur, 66, was arrested in January and initially charged with the murders of two men. Police revealed that they had been watching him for several months as part of their ongoing investigations into the disappearances of several gay/bi men from Toronto’s gay village.They swooped upon McArthur when they saw a man entering his property. Fearing for his safety, they entered the property and found him tied up but unharmed.Subsequent investigations discovered human blood belonging to some of the missing men in McArthur’s home, as well as photographs of some of the missing on McArthur’s computer. It’s thought some of the photos were taken post-mortem.center_img eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) Since his arrest, investigators have searched around 100 sites associated with the gardener. Human remains belonging to seven men have been identified. He now faces eight separate first-degree murder charges, although remains of the eighth man have yet to have been found.The dead men have been identified as: Selim Esen; Skandaraj Navaratnam; Andrew Kinsman; Majeed Kayhan; Dean Lisowick; Soroush Mahmudi; Abdulbasir Faizi; and Kirushna Kanagaratnam.Toronto experiences sub-zero weather conditions in the winter, which hampered the search for remains. Police are returning to sites now that it is summer and the ground fully thawed.Toronto Police continue their search of the forest ravine this week (Photo: Toronto Police Service | Facebook)They are continuing to investigate McArthur in connection with other cases of missing men. Some of these cold cases date back to the mid 1970s.Detective Sargent Hank Idsinga, lead investigator, told reporters yesterday: ‘Yesterday afternoon, human remains were located at one of the first digging sites … We haven’t identified what the remains are or who they belonged to.’McArthur’s next court appearance is due 23 July.Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . Police in Toronto say they have found more human remains at a location connected to suspected gay serial killer Bruce McArthur.last_img read more

50 Cent tweets death threat after someone photoshops him with rainbow teeth

first_imgThe Candy Shop singer took to Twitter last night (27 August) to repost the photo and blow off some steam about it.‘Who did this,’ he tweeted. ‘I want you niggas on the internet dead. Fuck everybody laughing at this shit.’He also captioned the photo with ‘get the strap’ – a term he coined on Instagram to mean someone has ticked you off.Who did this I want you niggas on the internet dead. Fuck everybody laughing at this shit. #getthestrap pic.twitter.com/yvCHa77IJ4— 50cent (@50cent) August 28, 2018But the answer to 50 Cent’s question of who did the photoshop job was staring right at him.In the top right hand corner, the picture is clearly tagged with photo credit: ‘MISTERMORRIS’ Nicki Minaj is in hot water for homophobic lyrics on her new album, QueenEveryday moments of gay history captured on new websiteLGBTI rapper CupcaKKe gets upfront in new queer video ‘Crayons’Read the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/50-cent-get-the-strap/ And if you follow through to the Twitter page of @mistermorris55, you can see the photo published a day ago.Mystery solved.Ja Rule calls 50 Cent a ‘power bottom’Earlier this year, Ja Rule bizarrely called fellow rapper 50 Cent a ‘power bottom’ over Twitter.In a series of tweets, Ja Rule called him a ‘tickle booty’.Reigniting an almost 20 year-long feud, Ja Rule also tweeted: ‘I’m confused as to why ppl think 50 cent is tough?’Then in a follow-up tweet, he says: ‘I really don’t see why ppl like 50 cent aka #Powerbottom he hates on any black man or woman having success… he hates on Diddy on Jay on Empire cmon how you beefing with Taraji??? #ticklebooty’And in a later tweet: ‘Now I know why 50 cent named his show POWER… #Powerbottom #ticklebooty’50 Cent did not respond to the tweets.Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading…center_img GAYSTARNEWS- Rapper 50 Cent just threatened people on the ‘internet’ after seeing a photoshopped photo of himself with rainbow hair and teeth. 50 Cent. | Photo: TigerDirect.com / Flickrlast_img read more

Mexican marine rescues crew of four at Mahahual after motor fails

first_imgMahahual, Q.R. — Two Italians and their dogs were rescued by local marine officials outside Mahahual Thursday after their boat motor failed.The Navy Secretariat of Mexico reported that naval personnel rescued two people who were aboard a sailboat that had problems in its propellant system. Marine personnel took to the sea in search of the small vessel.Photo: Navy Secretariat of MexicoThe boat was located in the vicinity of Punta Xocox about 7 nautical miles off the shores of Mahahual.Mexican officials say they received the distress call for help from the boat who said their motor had failed. Mexican search and rescue were quick to leave their post in search of the crew of four due to oncoming bad weather.They were able to tow the boat safely to shore where all on board were reported to be in good health. The Navy Secretariat of Mexico recorded the quick rescue on video.In July, the Navy of Mexico off Isla Mujeres assisted in the escorting of an American sailboat to the island by a Panamanian vessel after the crew of two lost propulsion.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)last_img read more

New understanding of exercise may help in the fight against depression

first_imgIf you suffer from depression, you’ve likely been advised to get plenty of exercise. Scientists have now gained a fresh understanding of how being active helps alleviate the condition, and they believe that their findings could lead to better treatments.In a study led by Iowa State University’s Asst. Prof. Jacob Meyer, 17 women who had been diagnosed with depression were tasked with completing two 30-minute exercise sessions on a stationary bike. One of these sessions was performed at a prescribed moderate intensity, while the other was done at an intensity of the test subject’s choice.Blood samples were gathered before and after each workout, plus the women’s mood and anxiety levels were assessed both 10 and 30 minutes after the end of each session. It was found that while both sessions resulted in a temporary mood boost, the prescribed-intensity workout had a stronger and longer-lasting effect. Additionally, only that session resulted in a rise of endocannabinoid levels in the bloodstream. Endocannabinoids are cannabinoid molecules which occur naturally in the body, and it has previously been suggested that they may help lower pain and depression by strengthening connections within the brain. They could also assist in reducing intestinal inflammation, and treating obesity.The inferior effect of the self-moderated stationary bike sessions was likely due to the fact that participants tended to “take it easy,” not getting as vigorous of a workout. That said, it could also be a psychosomatic effect, as the participants believed that a pace set by another, more authoritative person would be more conducive to relieving depression … so their minds and bodies made that happen. In either case, the results mesh with the findings of one of Meyer’s previous studies, in which it was determined that depressed women who performed prescribed workouts subsequently had higher levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) – this is a protein that regulates neuron growth, and depressed people tend to have lower levels of it in their blood.”Finding alternatives to medication is important for the treatment of depression,” says Meyer. “If we can figure out how exercise works with the endocannabinoid system, we could then design optimal exercise interventions.”A paper on the research – which also involved scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Medical College of Wisconsin and William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital – was recently published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.Source: Iowa State University Powered by We recommend I consent to the use of Google Analytics and related cookies across the TrendMD network (widget, website, blog). Learn more Privacy policy Google Analytics settings Yes Nolast_img read more

Car drives through church wall

first_imgWebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite A car drove into the boundary wall of the church at the corner of Egerton and Residency Road (across from Dr de Bruin’s rooms) this afternoon (Saturday).The driver allegedly lost control of the vehicle before ploughing through the wall.Sharaj Ambulance Services responded and treated the injured before transporting them to hospital.Public Safety and towing services were also on scene. DID YOU KNOW?Click on the words highlighted in red to read more on this and related topics.If you are reading this on your cellphone and there are telephone numbers provided in the text, you can call these simply by clicking on them.To receive news links via WhatsApp.For the latest news, visit our webpage or follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Join us there!last_img read more

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first_img Technology | Interventional Radiology | June 24, 2019 Mentice and Siemens Healthineers Integrate VIST Virtual Patient With Artis Icono Angiography System Siemens Healthineers and Mentice AB announced the collaboration to fully integrate Mentice’s VIST Virtual Patient into… read more Technology | September 25, 2008 Gemini Portable DR Aims for Affordabilty News | CT Angiography (CTA) | July 11, 2019 Mednax National Cardiac Centers of Excellence Program Highlighted at SCCT 2019 Mednax Inc. and Mednax Radiology Solutions announced that Chief Medical Officer Ricardo C. Cury, M.D., FSCCT, will… read more News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 04, 2019 Aidoc Announces CE Mark for AI-based Pulmonary Embolism Workflow Tool Artificial intelligence (AI) radiology solution provider Aidoc announced the commercial release of its CE-marked… read more Del Medical will sell and market New Medical Imaging of China’s Gemini family of full-field, portable DR flat panels in the Americas. The Gemini DR flat panels are designed to be a cost-effective upgrade option that allows healthcare providers to take the next step in digital radiography while maintaining their current equipment. Gemini flat panels are easily integrated into Del’s tables, which allows existing customers to upgrade or field retrofit their digital imaging systems. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Technology | Angiography | March 01, 2019 iSchemaView Launches RAPID Angio iSchemaView announced the release of RAPID Angio, a complete neuroimaging solution for the angiography suite that… read more Philips and Microsoft have partnered to develop an augmented reality system to help imporve workflow and procedural navigation in the cath lab. Physicians wearing visors can view and interact with true 3-D holograms above the patient on the table and manipulate the image with voice and hand motion commands to avoid breaking the sterile field.  Technology | Radiation Dose Management | April 04, 2019 Omega Medical Imaging Launches AI-enabled FluoroShield for Radiation Reduction The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted Omega Medical Imaging 510(k) clearance to offer their artificial… read more center_img Technology | Radiation Dose Management | May 23, 2019 ControlRad Announces FDA Clearance and Launch of ControlRad Trace ControlRad Inc. announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted 510(k) clearance for its ControlRad… read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | July 24, 2019 WVU Medicine Installs First Alphenix 4D CT in the U.S. The West Virginia University (WVU) Heart and Vascular Institute is the first hospital in the country to acquire the… read more Related Content News | Advanced Visualization | February 25, 2019 Philips and Microsoft Showcase Augmented Reality for Image-Guided Minimally Invasive Therapies Philips will unveil a new mixed reality concept developed together with Microsoft that the company says is designed for… read more 360 Photos | Angiography | May 17, 2019 360 View Inside a Cath/EP Lab at Baylor Heart Hospital This is a view inside one of the 11 cath labs at … read more Technology | Mobile C-Arms | February 18, 2019 Philips Launches Zenition Mobile C-arm Platform Philips announced the launch of Philips Zenition, its new mobile C-arm imaging platform. Mobile C-arms are X-ray… read morelast_img read more

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first_img Feature | Information Technology | May 17, 2019 | Carol Amick 3 Recommendations to Better Understand HIPAA Compliance According to the U.S. read more 3D Auto RV application image courtesy of Philips Healthcare 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 08, 2019 360 Degree View of an Echocardiography Exam on the SC2000 System This is a 360 degree view of a live cardiac echo demonstration for the Siemens Healthineers Acuson SC2000… read more News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | July 02, 2019 Konica Minolta Healthcare Partners With DiA Imaging Analysis for AI-based Cardiac Ultrasound Analysis DiA Imaging Analysis has partnered with Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. to expand analysis capabilities of… read more 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 09, 2019 360 Degree View of a Mitral Valve Ultrasound Exam on a Vivid E95 System A view of a mitral valve on a GE Healthcare Vivid E95 … read more ScImage’s reporting module PICOM Structured Reportware (PicomSR) for echocardiography combines structured reporting elements along with voice recognition, delivering a pre-populated report that the technician can start by importing elements such as procedure descriptions, indications, measurements, observations during procedure and simple findings from the modality. The physician can finish the report by adding their nonstructured conclusions at the end of the report via built-in voice recognition. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Related Content News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 05, 2019 Digital Health Devices Used at Point of Care May Improve Diagnostic Certainty A West Virginia-based rural medical outreach event showcased the use of point-of-care technology in an ambulatory… read more center_img News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | June 20, 2019 Bay Labs Announces New Echocardiography Guidance Software Data at ASE 2019 Scientific Sessions Bay Labs announced that new data on the company’s first-of-its-kind deep learning investigational guidance software… read more Technology | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | July 02, 2019 Philips Extends Advanced Automation on Epiq CVx Cardiovascular Ultrasound Platform Philips recently announced new advanced automation capabilities on its Epiq CVx and Epiq CVxi cardiac ultrasound… read more Technology | March 02, 2009 ScImage Features New Reporting Module for Echocardiography News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 07, 2019 Contrast Use in First Transthoracic Echocardiogram for Heart Failure Reduces Repeat Testing Heart failure is the fourth most common cause for all admission to U.S. hospitals, and it is the most common reason for… read more 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 11, 2019 360 Degree View of a Smartphone Performing a Cardiac Ultrasound Exam This 360 degree photo shows a basic, point-of-care cardiac echocardiogram being performed using a smartphone turned i read more News | Ultrasound Imaging | June 27, 2019 FDA Issues Final Guidance on Marketing Clearance of Diagnostic Ultrasound Systems and Transducers The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued the final guidance: Marketing Clearance of Diagnostic Ultrasound… read more last_img read more

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first_imgFind more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiology Imaging View all 288 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Information Technology View all 220 items Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Find more SCCT news and videos Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Women’s Health View all 62 items Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Technology Reports View all 9 items Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Videos | March 22, 2011 The Next Generation in MRI-Directed Breast Intervention by Aurora Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Find more SCCT news and videos Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Herelast_img read more

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first_img News | PET-CT | June 19, 2019 United Imaging Announces First U.S. Clinical Install of uMI 550 Digital PET/CT United Imaging announced the first U.S. clinical installation of the uMI 550 Digital positron emission tomography/… read more Figure 1. A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse from Amsterdam Ph.D. researcher Gustav Strijkers. News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | August 02, 2019 ASRT Supports Radiopharmaceutical Reimbursement Bill The American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) announced its support for House Resolution (HR) 3772, a measure… read more X-ray images such as the one on the left fail to indicate many cases of advanced bone destruction caused by multiple myeloma, says the author of new guidelines on imaging for patients with myeloma and related disorders. Image courtesy of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center. Related Content Technology | Information Technology | June 20, 2019 DOSIsoft Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance for Planet Onco Dose Software DOSIsoft announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market Planet… read more News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | July 26, 2019 NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes Awarded $30 Million by U.S. Department of Energy NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes LLC has been awarded $15 million in a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of… read more News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 17, 2019 International Working Group Releases New Multiple Myeloma Imaging Guidelines An International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) has developed the first set of new recommendations in 10 years for… read more News | March 28, 2011 SNM Enhances Education Program for 2011 Annual Meeting News | Interventional Radiology | July 31, 2019 International Multidisciplinary Group Publishes Recommendations for Personalized HCC Treatment With Y90 TheraSphere New consensus recommendations for personalized treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with BTG’s TheraSphere have… read more News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | July 01, 2019 Bracco Imaging Acquires Blue Earth Diagnostics Bracco Imaging S.p.A. has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Blue Earth Diagnostics, a molecular imaging company… read more News | PET-CT | August 15, 2019 United Imaging Announces First U.S. Clinical Installation of uExplorer Total-body PET/CT United Imaging announced that its uExplorer total-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) system… read more March 28, 2011 – The Society of Nuclear Medicine’s (SNM) 2011 Annual Meeting, June 4-8 in San Antonio, offers a variety of new education options to nuclear medicine and molecular imaging professionals. With new topics, formats and technologies, the meeting provides a comprehensive review of the latest research and issues in the field.”In planning the education offerings for the annual meeting, we look to provide attendees with programming that will increase their professional effectiveness, allowing them to examine and evaluate future directions in nuclear medicine, molecular imaging and therapy from both research and clinical perspectives,” said Peter Herscovitch, M.D., chair of SNM’s scientific program committee. “The program combines the latest advances in basic sciences with state of the art reviews of oncology, cardiology and neurology applications.” This year, new topics at SNM include healthcare reform, the future of nuclear medicine from the physicians’ perspective, an update on radioimmunotherapy and use of generator-produced Ga-68. Three hybrid sessions — featuring a mix of basic science, translational and clinical approaches — will be presented on breast cancer, neuroimaging and infection. In addition, SNM will host several courses on dose reduction and radiation safety. Continuing education courses developed by SNM include those on pediatric dose reduction, reducing patient radiation exposure while improving diagnostic testing, standards of excellence and more.For the first time, SNM will host a Nuclear Cardiology Technology workshop. There will also be six integrated scientific sessions — sessions that combine abstract presentations with a featured guest speaker. Self-assessment modules for the maintenance of certification program will be back as well.During the plenary sessions, questions will be taken via text message and Twitter. Also new, SNM will capture 70 sessions and post them online as a virtual meeting available afterwards. The virtual meeting, with pre-meeting, on-site and post-meeting pricing, will include 35 continuing education sessions, 20 technologist sessions and 15 scientific sessions. “SNM strives improve its content each year, adapting to the changing needs of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging professionals,” said Herscovitch. “We have a strong program this year and look forward to a successful meeting.”The SNM Annual Meeting is the foremost educational and networking event in molecular imaging and nuclear medicine. The meeting attracts more than 5,000 scientists, physicians, pharmacists and technologists in the molecular imaging and nuclear medicine fields.Attendees can choose full meeting registration or a weekend-only registration. Registration is required to receive credit for attending the sessions.For more information: www.snm.org/am2011 FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | July 16, 2019 NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes Completes Construction on Beloit, Wis. Molybdenum-99 Processing Facility NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes LLC  announced completion of construction on its 20,000-square-foot molybdenum-99 (Mo-… read more News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 07, 2019 Amsterdam University Medical Center Wins MR Solutions’ Image of the Year Award The Amsterdam University Medical Center has won MR Solutions’ Image of the Year 2019 award for the best molecular… read morelast_img read more

What to Consider When Comparing 64slice to Higher Slice CT Systems

first_img Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Technology Reports View all 9 items Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 08, 2016 What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. SCCT 2016 – 64-Slice CT vs Higher-Slice SystemsVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 12:21Loaded: 1.33%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -12:21 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Conference Coverage View all 396 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health View all 62 items Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reportingcenter_img Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Recent Videos View all 606 items Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D., FACC, FSCCT, director of South Florida Imaging Cardiovascular Institute, Holy Cross Hospital, at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2016 annual meeting. Smuclovisky explains what imaging departments need to know about when purchasing the newest generation of CT scanners. He explains there is more to scanners than slices, offering information beyond the hype over 64-, 128-, 256-, 320-, and 640-slice CT scanners.  For more information, read “Costs vs. Benefits: Comparing 64-Slice to 256, 320-Slice CT.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Sponsored Videos View all 142 items FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology View all 220 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System.last_img read more