PM reminds people of Emergency says dont take democracy for granted

first_imgNew Delhi: Prime Minister Narendra Modi Sunday reminded people of the Emergency and urged them not to take democracy “for granted”, saying in day-to-day life, it is difficult to savour the joy of democratic rights, unless they are snatched away. In his first ‘Mann ki Baat’ monthly radio address after returning to power, he said everyday when one gets to eat food on time, one doesn’t realize what hunger pangs are. “Similarly, in day-to-day life, it is difficult to savour the joy of democratic rights, unless they are snatched away. During Emergency, every citizen of the country had started getting the feeling that something that belonged to him had been snatched away. If what was snatched had never been enjoyed by that person, ever, it had to eventually precipitate into a painful inner agony,” he said. Also Read – Balakot strikes show major shift in govt’s handling of terror attacks: IAF chief The prime minister reminded people that in order to ensure smooth conduct of the social order, a constitution is required. “Laws and rules are necessary, rights and duties should be part of due discourse,” he said. On June 25, India marked the 44th anniversary of Emergency. In 1977 Lok Sabha elections, the PM said, people voted without bothering about other rights and requirements. They voted, he said, “just for the sake of saving democracy. And the country had witnessed one such Election in 1977.” Also Read – Pak activated 20 terror camps, 20 launch pads along LoC “When something is in close proximity of us, we tend to underestimate its importance. We ignore even amazing facts about it. We have been blessed with a democracy so invaluable, yet we take it for granted so easily,” he said. Modi was of the view that people must keep reminding themselves that democracy is “gloriously great, it flows in our veins, through centuries of dedicated practice.” Referring to the recently-concluded Lok Sabha election, he said a record 61 crore out of nearly 91 crore voters exercised their franchise. “If you exclude China, the number of people who voted in India exceeds the population of any other country in the world. The number of people who voted in the 2019 Lok Sabha election is more than the entire population of America, close to double the figure. The total number of voters in India exceeds the entire population of Europe,” said in his address. He pointed out that lakhs of teachers, officers and staff strived day and night to carry out the exercise. Three lakh personnel of the central armed police forces, 20 lakh state police personnel ensured free and fair elections. “Besides this, there is another fact pertaining to these elections that swells our hearts with pride. Perhaps, this is the first time ever that women have enthusiastically voted, as much as men did. This time the ratio of men and women who voted was almost the same. “Another encouraging fact is that, today, there are a record 78 women Members of Parliament. I congratulate the Election Commission and every person connected with the electioneering process and salute the aware voters of India,” Modi said. The prime minister also used the opportunity to ask people to read more and more books at a time when everything is available using “Google guru”. He said he prefers books and not bouquets as gifts and referred to a collection of Munshi Premchand’s stories which he went through again recently. ” … in today’s digital world and in the time of Google Guru … take some time out from your daily routine and devote it to books,” he said.last_img read more

Jennifer Lawrence Visits Childrens Hospital In Canada

first_imgJennifer Lawrence visited patients at the Shriners Hospital for Children in Montreal last week.Jennifer Lawrence Visits Shriners Hospitals For Children In CanadaCredit/Copyright: Facebook“Jennifer Lawrence is in Montreal filming a new movie and she made time to visit some of our ‪#‎ShrinersCanada‬ kids and staff. Everyone had a great time!” said a note on the Shriners Facebook page.last_img

Chiefs threaten to take action to stop Harper

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Chiefs of Ontario have a stern warning for the federal government.No unilateral imposition is going to work in their communities and they’ll take action to prevent those things from happening.The chiefs made the announcement at a news conference Thursday rejecting any proposed federal education legislation.They said it’s missing one important element.APTN National News reporter Delaney Windigo tells us what that is.last_img

Inquest into deadly BC sawmill explosion underway

first_imgAPTN National NewsIt’s been nearly three and a half years since the deadly sawmill explosion in Burns Lake, B.C. that killed two people and injured 20 others.A coroner’s inquest is currently underway that may provide answers as to what happened that night.APTN’s Tina House has the story.last_img

People are ready to oust Modi Abhishek

first_imgArra (Bankura): Taking a dig at the Prime Minister on Monday, Trinamool Youth Congress president Abhishek Banerjee said the people have caught the double standards of Narendra Modi and are ready to oust him.”People have caught the double standards of Modi and have decided to oust him. On May 23, the lead of Trinamool candidates will go up and Modi will go to tender his resignation to the President,” said Banerjee. He was addressing a mammoth rally here on Monday afternoon. Banerjee said Modi is talking about Hinduism, but in reality he has done nothing. “Five years ago in 2014 he had talked about the construction of Ram Mandir and is talking about it again to gain mileage for the polls,” he said. The Trinamool Youth Congress president said Mamata Banerjee has improved the places of worship for all religions. “The vast areas surrounding Tarakeshwar temple have been upgraded and beautified. In Dakshineshwar, a skywalk has been constructed to facilitate the pilgrims. In the temple town of Tarapith, massive development has been carried out. Even the burial grounds and crematoriums have been restored and developed,” he said. Banerjee alleged that “the corrupt people are thronging around Modi.” “Nirav Modi and Vijay Mallya want Modi’s return. Modi addresses meetings with the prime accused of Saradha chit fund scam sitting next to him. All the corrupt people have taken shelter in BJP,” he said, adding: “Pakistan Prime Minister and ISI want Modi to come back. But the people in this country want to oust him. The farmers, workers, small traders and common people will vote him out.” He said that in the past seven years, massive development has taken place in Bankura. Steps have been taken to address the water crisis in some pockets. People from all walks of life have received benefits under the various schemes taken up by the state government. He urged people to cast their votes in favour of party nominee Subrata Mukherjee. “Go to the polling stations early in the morning and give your opinion in our favour,” he said.last_img read more

Loonie closes below parity on signal that rates wont rise this year

TORONTO – The Canadian dollar closed below parity with the greenback for the first time in more than two months Thursday in the wake of the Bank of Canada’s signal that interest rate hikes are likely further off than previously thought.The loonie declined 0.39 of a cent to 99.71 cents US on top of a drop of almost two-thirds of a cent Wednesday as the central bank kept its key rate at one per cent and lowered its economic estimates.The bank has shaved three-tenths of a point off its projections for growth for both 2012 and 2013, to 1.9 per cent and 2.0 per cent respectively.The change in the guidance likely means the Bank of Canada won’t move to tighten borrowing costs until some time in 2014.However, it’s not expected that this latest move below parity is anything but temporary.Camilla Sutton, chief currency strategist at Scotia Capital, called the losses of the past couple of days a temporary repricing.“The market has made some adjustments to their expectation in terms of the timing of the first rate hike in Canada,” she said.However, she noted that the Bank of Canada is still far more hawkish or more likely to hike rates than the U.S. Federal Reserve “and that’s supportive of the Canadian dollar.”She also said that the loonie will be supported by improving global growth and the favourable investor view of Canada.“The flow should remain favourable into Canada this year and combined all together should create an environment where the dollar doesn’t rally to new highs but still rallies through parity and tests the highs we saw last year.”The loonie peaked last year close to 104 cents US.There was good news from the world’s second-biggest economy as China’s manufacturing crept higher in January to the fastest pace in two years. A preliminary version of HSBC’s monthly purchasing managers’ index rose for the fifth month in a row to 51.9 in January from 51.5 in December. Readings above 50 on the 100-point scale indicate an expansion.The report is further evidence that China’s economy is undergoing a modest recovery from a downturn sparked by the 2008 world financial crisis.Its economy expanded 7.9 per cent in the final quarter of last year, up from 7.4 per cent in the previous quarter. For all of 2012, the economy expanded 7.8 per cent, the slowest annual performance since the 1990s.The Chinese data helped push oil prices higher.The March crude contract on the New York Mercantile Exchange gained 72 cents to US$95.95 a barrel after falling $1.45 on Wednesday. The decline came after crude shipments through the Seaway pipeline from Cushing, Oklahoma, to refineries on the Gulf Coast had to be cut to less than half because of limited endpoint capacity.Copper slipped one cent to US$3.68 a pound.Gold bullion declined, with the February contract on the New York Mercantile Exchange down $16.80 to US$1,669.90 an ounce. by Malcolm Morrison, The Canadian Press Posted Jan 24, 2013 4:29 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Loonie closes below parity on signal that rates won’t rise this year read more

Update on search for ViceProvost and Associate VicePresident Academic

Members of the Brock community are invited to attend public presentations from the three short-listed candidates for the Vice-Provost and Associate Vice-President, Academic position.Kate Bezanson, Brock UniversityFriday, Jan. 1211:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.E-Classroom, TH 253Watch Bezanson’s presentation on Microsoft Stream or Video Centre.Brian Power, Brock UniversityTuesday, Jan. 1611:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.Plaza 600FWatch Power’s presentation on Microsoft Stream or Video Centre.Lise Gotell, University of AlbertaFriday, Jan. 1911:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.E-Classroom, TH 253Watch Gotell’s presentation on Microsoft Stream or Video Centre.Brock faculty and staff are invited to submit written feedback by Jan. 26 regarding the suitability of each candidate. Applicants’ curriculum vitae are available for review on SharePoint.Email submissions to Thomas Dunk, Chair of the Advisory Committee. Anonymous submissions will not be accepted. Submissions will be confidential to the Advisory Committee.For more information, please email Patricia Mosca. read more

Opinion Braxton Miller could feature prominently in Ohio States season opener

Then-junior quarterback Braxton Miller (5) looks for an open receiver during the 2014 Discover Orange Bowl against Clemson Jan. 3 at Sun Life Stadium. OSU lost, 40-35.Credit: Lantern file photoSkepticism and doubt surrounded Braxton Miller when he announced in late July via an interview with Sports Illustrated that he’d be transitioning from his original position of quarterback to H-back this upcoming season.On a roster brimming with talent, especially on offense, many wondered just how much of the field the redshirt senior would see in what will be his final season at Ohio State. On top of taking on the challenges of learning a whole new position, Miller would have to leapfrog a multitude of skilled players.Regardless of his incredible playmaking ability, it looked like it’d be an uphill climb for the two-time Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year.That is, until OSU coach Urban Meyer announced that redshirt sophomore Jalin Marshall and junior Dontre Wilson, as well as wide receiver Corey Smith, would be suspended for the Buckeyes’ season opener at Virginia Tech. Junior star defensive end Joey Bosa was also amongst those suspended.Outside of Bosa, all were projected to be key components in OSU’s spread offense. Marshall and Wilson are hybrid type players, and each play the role of H-back. Smith, entering his redshirt senior season, enjoyed a great spring and had firmly cemented his status as the No. 2 wideout in rotation.So, through unfortunate circumstances, a rare opportunity has been presented to Miller. With the highly anticipated “revenge game” fast approaching, he’s in line to receive significant minutes.Thus far, his move to H-back has gone pretty seamlessly and has fans eager to see what he’ll bring to the table. Miller is still capable of breaking any game wide open as his athletic ability has been all too apparent in practices, something senior linebacker Joshua Perry has become pretty familiar with.“Don’t blink, he’s got some of the crispest, most ridiculous moves,” Perry said at the Big Ten Media Days in Chicago on July 30. “His footwork is amazing, he’s really fluid, and his speed is obvious.”Meyer, a former wide receiver coach, remains skeptical and is Miller’s biggest critic, going so far as to say that it’d be “uncommon” to throw the ex-quarterback straight into the fire so early in the season. Admittedly so, the three-time national champion coach can’t deny the kind of difference-maker that sits ready in his stable.“He’s one of the best athletes I’ve ever coached,” Meyer said on July 30. “He’s got an incredible first step. Above all else, you say it’s time to win or lose, and he’s not going to lose.”The expectation is that Miller will be a true “impact player” on offense. Considering the suspensions that have been handed out, plan on seeing a fairly heavy dosage of him in the Buckeyes’ Sept. 7 showdown in Blacksburg, Va.Only versatile sophomore, and current backup running back, Curtis Samuel stands in Miller’s way at H-back. Time will tell, though, as to who exactly will get the majority of the work at the hybrid position.How Miller comes along in terms of the continued development of his route running is something worth keeping a close eye on. At any rate, Meyer will undoubtedly find it tough to make a case for not adequately providing OSU’s in-state product with substantial playing time come Week One. read more

Man remanded for robbing male sex workers

Of the four men who allegedly robbed two male sex workers on Wednesday last, one was today (Friday), remanded for the crime.Twenty-four-year-old, Michael Macy appeared at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts and had the charges read to him.The first charge alleges that he, on December 12 2017 at Croal Street, Georgetown while being together with others and armed with guns, robbed Denzil Benjamin of a cellphone valued $45,600.A second charge against him, which he also denied, alleges that he, on the same day at the same location and being in the company of the same men, also while being armed, robbed Kevin McLean of one motorcycle valued $178,000.Both charges were made indictable and as such the accused was not allowed to plead.Police Prosecutor Richard Harris objected to bail being granted on the grounds that a firearm was used; also due to the fact that the other three accused are yet to be charged.As such Magistrate Daly remanded Macy to prison for him to return on January, 26 2018. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedTwo remanded to prison for robbing Royal Castle DeliverymanApril 17, 2014In “Crime”Duo charged for robbery under arms, forgeryJanuary 19, 2018In “Court”Sex workers accused of robbing Presidential guards remanded for robbing anotherOctober 30, 2017In “Court” read more

What to expect from Battlefield 4s Frostbite 3 engine

first_imgRegardless of your feelings toward shooters or Electronic Arts, Battlefield 4 has looked mighty impressive every time it’s been shown off. The E3 Microsoft Xbox One keynote may have tricked you into thinking BF4 was a first-person boat shooter, but this spotlight trailer for the Frostbite 3 engine shows you that, yes, while there is plenty of FPBS to go around, the game can handle much more than that.Among Frostbite 3’s impressive features — networked water simulation, which essentially creates the same body of water for every player to see. If a wave is moving in a certain pattern, it’s moving that way for everyone on the map, and at the exact same time. Rather than just be pretty tech, though, the networked water sim provides the boat-heavy combat with a dynamic environment in which players can use to their advantage — be it via using a wave for cover, or battling a current while swimming.Frostbite 3 doesn’t just up the water ante, though, as it attempts to upgrade character emotions in order to help games convey better narratives. The eyes are portals to one’s soul, but in the land of video games, the eyes are one of the main determining factors as to whether or not a character can climb out of the uncanny valley. Nothing is more disruptive to a narrative than jarring characters, and Frostbite 3 has a focus on characters’ eyes in order to soften that uncanny valley blow — complete with parallax animation in the iris. No longer will parallax animation be confined to grassy backgrounds in old Sega side-scroller beat-em-ups.If pretty eyes and using dynamic waves as ocean-based cover isn’t impressive, Frostbite 3 is why huge buildings can crumble to the ground in the middle of a BF4 match.Battlefield 4 will release in North America on October 29 of this year, so watch the above video, get pumped for first-person boat shooting, and then find something else to do for four months while you wait, we guess. VIEW PHOTO GALLERY Battlefield 4 – Siege on Shanghai Multiplayer Screens_1 WMBattlefield 4 – Siege on Shanghai Multiplayer Screens_1 WMBattlefield 4 – Siege on Shanghai Multiplayer Screens_2 WMBattlefield 4 – Siege on Shanghai Multiplayer Screens_3 WMBattlefield 4 – Siege on Shanghai Multiplayer Screens_4 WMBattlefield 4 Commander Mode ScreensBattlefield 4 Commander Mode Screens9Battlefield 4 – Angry Sea Single Player Screens_4 WMBattlefield 4 – Angry Sea Single Player Screens_5 WMBattlefield 4Battlefield 4 – Angry Sea Single Player Screens_7 WMlast_img read more

Love Parade organisers to face trial over stampede deaths

first_imgLove Parade organisers to face trial over stampede deaths A stampede at the music festival killed 21 people and injured over 650 others. By AFP Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article 16,020 Views Apr 24th 2017, 9:26 PM Candles near the site where 21 people died and some 650 were injured in a stampede during the Love Parade Image: Associated Press Short URL http://jrnl.ie/3356682 center_img A GERMAN COURT today ruled that 10 people will face trial accused of negligently causing a catastrophic stampede at a 2010 Love Parade techno music festival that killed 21 people.Overturning a year-old ruling, the court decided that four event organisers and six officials of the city of Duisburg will face charges including negligent manslaughter and causing bodily harm.Prosecutors, victims’ relatives and survivors have pointed to chaotic crowd management as the cause of the disaster in which revellers were crushed, trampled to death and suffocated.More than 650 people were injured in the mass panic as pressure from a heaving sea of hundreds of thousands of young people squashed the victims against fences and walls.A Duisburg court dismissed the criminal case last year, casting doubt on an expert report on the disaster, in a ruling that angered victims’ groups.But now, after an appeal, a higher panel in Duesseldorf overturned that ruling, saying there was a “sufficiently” high chance of convicting those responsible.It said in a statement there was “cause to believe” that shortcomings in organisers’ duty of care caused the deaths and injuries.The court did not set a starting date for the trial. Negligent manslaughter carries up to five years in prison.Victims Prosecutors blamed serious planning errors for the 24 July, 2010 tragedy at the site, a former cargo rail depot in the western industrial city.Eight men and 13 women were killed — included seven foreigners, from Australia, China, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain.The city mayor at the time, Adolf Sauerland, became the prime target of public anger, accused of having ignored warnings that the summer festival was a disaster waiting to happen, and was forced to resign by a 2012 city referendum.The Love Parade started as an underground event in the former West Berlin in 1989 and was held there most years until 2006, at times drawing over one million people.Following wrangling over permits and arguments over the mountains of rubbish left behind, the festival moved from Berlin to cities in western Germany’s industrial Ruhr region until the tragedy of 2010.The deadly disaster led organisers to declare that the Love Parade would never be held again “out of respect for the victims”.Comments are closed for legal reasons. – © AFP 2017Read: ‘He ended up in an induced coma’: Matt Dawson on his son’s meningitis battleRead: Marine Le Pen steps down as leader of her party No Comments Image: Associated Press Candles near the site where 21 people died and some 650 were injured in a stampede during the Love Parade Monday 24 Apr 2017, 9:26 PM Share3 Tweet Email last_img read more

What does Cyprus mean for your portfolio

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram A couple of weeks ago, well-known conservative columnist Gerard Henderson said on the ABC’s Insiders that one of the biggest issues facing Europe that had “implications” for Australia was the “economic basket case” of Crete.We are sure that after he had his morning croissant and coffee, Henderson would have reflected that he meant Cyprus.The implications of Cyprus’ financial difficulties, stemming from too much money swishing around and too little productivity, are far reaching, to be sure. But some believe the market’s selling in response has been an over-reaction and instead look at it as a buying opportunity, particularly for the most beleaguered of all sectors, resources.One of the fund managers spoken to – who has been buying small miners in the past weeks – has a track record of consistent performance, having returned about 13 per cent a year to investors in his fund in the past 10 years.“I would say that all the negative news is in the price of most miners,” he said. “It wouldn’t take much positive news to see a significant bounce in the next six weeks.“Even if Europe is a write-off, the two largest economies in the world are promoting expansion and Japan is now stepping up. It’s far from doom and gloom.”Our bullish fund manager’s argument is that Cyprus is a poor indicator for Europe, but that is just one part of the global economic puzzle which, overall, is looking increasingly positive when you consider the amount of economic stimulus going on, both in money being pumped into big economies and in direct government spending.We saw some progress in ‘Abenomics’, where the Japanese are about to use aggressive monetary policy to kick-start their economy in the wake of 15 years of deflation and four recessions since 2000. Japan’s central bank said yesterday that it would buy 7 trillion yen ($69.4 billion) worth of bonds a month.Then you have the United States, where unemployment remains a big concern, underpinning the continuation of quantitative easing, where the central bank prints money to buy low-rated mortgage bonds at the rate of $US40 billion ($38.4 billion) a month.Recent manufacturing data out of China was not as positive as expected but still indicates its economy is growing at a rate of about 6 or 7 per cent, according to some economists. Its government continues to pump trillions of yuan into infrastructure and education. Companies whose share prices are linked to demand in commodities have the most to gain from global economic growth continuing. There are still about 3 billion people in the world who would like to live the way many Australians do, and the world needs more commodities for this to be the case.The time to buy is often when sentiment is at its worst, and professional investors are supposed to be more dispassionate about these things. Time will tell.Radar spoke to another fund manager who was less sanguine about resources, but more bullish about small caps.David Lamm previously managed money for one of the richest families in Australia, the Alters, and has set up his own shop and managed to return more than 25 per cent a year in the past three years.“Cyprus means nothing more than increased risk in the global financial system,” he said. “Because the small end is so undervalued it’s not as vulnerable to a sell off.“I don’t think it’s the end of the world, but when the world comes through this, there is more potential to make money from undervalued small caps, which is why we’re buying them.”Interestingly, some of the small caps that Lamm likes definitely have an international flavour.For example, eServGlobal has a technology called HomeSend, which allows the diaspora of the world to send money back home via their mobile phones. Radar has tipped this stock and so far it has delivered a return of almost 50 per cent to investors. It’s a technology many expatriate Cypriots might consider using.*This article was first published in The Age.last_img read more

Behringer Soundscape Air Speakers des hautparleurs sans fil pour iPod

first_imgBehringer Soundscape Air Speakers: des haut-parleurs sans fil pour iPodEn plus d’être sans fil, ces nouvelles enceintes se rechargent par induction, donc plus besoin de câbles! Le spécialiste allemand de l’audio professionnelle Behringer s’est lancé dans des gammes de produits accessibles à tous et utiles quotidiennement (notamment les docks audio pour iPhone ou iPod…). Encore une fois, la firme présente un produit comptabile avec un terminal iOs. Le Soundscape Air Speakers ressemble à un dock, dont les enceintes sont détachables et sans fil, chargées par des batteries internes. Vous pourrez donc les transporter n’importe où dans votre maison. De plus, le tout se recharge par un chargeur induction (procédé électromagnétique qui recharge la batterie par le courant porté dans l’air). Ceci évitera de rebrancher votre enceinte que vous aurez déjà déplacé par exemple.Il faudra encore attendre pour en connaître les spécifications techniques, mais quoi qu’il en soit, Behringer vendra ses haut-parleurs aux alentours de 129 dollars (une centaine d’euros). Le 10 janvier 2012 à 12:00 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

WWE says Paige tested positive for an illegal substance responding to allegations

first_img Randy Torkkola October 12, 2016 at 10:51 am What a trainwreck… get a clue girl Aaron David Harwood b d WhatsApp Wouldn’t it be more “a second suspension (60 days)?” The way it reads it sounds like she’s had two 60 days as opposed to a 30 day and a (now) 60 day. Twitter The way I see, Paige is trying to get her fans to believe that the WWE is trying to railroad her with these suspensions. It seems to me that if the WWE wanted to be rid of her, they could just release her or send her home to ride out her contract, since I’m sure she’s on the lower end of the WWE’s pay scale. Glenn Wolf 6 COMMENTS Hart Guile Paige undergoes successful neck surgery; King of the Ring semi-finals and finals locations i didn’t realise sore throat lozenges were illegal. October 12, 2016 at 3:13 pm Tre Zencenter_img Google+ WWE Universal Champion Seth Rollins discovers his siblings through a 23andMe DNA test October 12, 2016 at 1:12 pm Paige to undergo a second neck surgery, pulled from SummerSlam weekend appearances The New York Post is featuring an article with an official statement from WWE responding to recent allegations about Paige (Saraya-Jade Bevis) and her second 60 day suspension from the company for violating the wellness policy.The article referenced comments from Paige’s family claiming she did not fail a drug test and instead tested positive for painkillers that she was prescribed to help treat her current neck problems. Her family also alleged she was not receiving proper medical care.WWE, in responding to the allegations, issued this statement.“Saraya-Jade Bevis tested positive for an illegal substance, not a prescription drug. In addition, WWE is providing world-class medical care for her in-ring injury.”We reported yesterday that Paige had issued a series of tweets responding to news about her second suspension where she stated “rules apply depending on your status.” October 12, 2016 at 7:22 am an “illegal substance” doesn’t necessarily mean cocaine, heroin, marijuana, etc… it could mean nyquil, tylenol, sore throat lozenges, etc. those tests will find EVERYTHING, and if you didn’t clear it with the wwe first, you’re screwed (unless you’re one of their top stars, then you can do whatever drug you want). Facebook Adam Martin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR If it was one of those I reckon WWE would’ve said banned, not illegal, their lawyers would’ve made sure of it. And your comment about stars doesn’t hold up either when you consider other bans that have been handed out in the past. Comments are closed. October 12, 2016 at 10:23 am October 15, 2016 at 6:58 am Pinterestlast_img read more

PeaceHealth OHSU team to bolster neonatal care in region

first_imgPeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University are joining forces to enhance neonatal care in Southwest Washington.Beginning March 1, board-certified neonatologists from OHSU’s Doernbecher Children’s Hospital will staff the Vancouver hospital’s Holtzman Twins Neonatal Intensive Care Unit around the clock. The collaboration will be headed by Dr. Robert Schelonka, head of the division of neonatology at Doernbecher and an associate professor at OHSU’s School of Medicine.The partnership will address the need for acute neonatology care at PeaceHealth Southwest, Schelonka said in a news release.“Building on the existing efforts of their neonatal team, we will enhance and broaden clinical services and capabilities to provide comprehensive, quality, safe, timely and family centered neonatal care for families in their home community whenever possible,” he said.The two hospitals will also share resources to enhance quality and reduce costs, cross-train medical professionals and broaden access to unique clinical trials that provide medical treatments and therapies often not available elsewhere in the region.“This collaboration will allow OHSU and PeaceHealth Southwest to work more closely to enhance and coordinate care for our most vulnerable newborns,” said Dr. Mark O’Hollaren, vice president for strategic outreach at OHSU and professor of medicine at OHSU’s School of Medicine. “Our goal is to allow as many babies as possible to receive care close to home and family, and when that is not possible, to have seamless care coordination between our two organizations to most effectively and compassionately care for these patients.”last_img read more

South Florida students dine with police officers Ronald McDonald

first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – A few South Florida students are enjoying a lunch date with Ronald McDonald and police.The lunch is part of the Do The Right Thing initiative where kids in student-at-risk areas get rewarded for their good behavior and good deeds.Ronald McDonald led the first ever Dine with an Officer event at the McDonald’s near Biscayne Boulevard and Northeast 82nd Street, in Miami.He packed games, prizes and happy meals for everyone. “We’re here with the Do The Right Thing organization, teaming up with McDonald’s and the Miami-Dade Police Department, having lots of fun and encouraging doing the right thing,” said Ronald McDonald.“It’s kind of rewarding because just by doing the right thing, I get to see police officers and come to McDonalds,” said North Miami Elementary School Student, Tatiana Luc.The students were awarded with prizes, T-shirts and personalized congratulatory letters signed by Miami Police Chief Rodolfo Llanes and Miami-Dade Schools Police Chief Ian Moffett.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

Poor suffer as Gandhi ambulances go defunct

first_imgSecunderabad: People planning to take back their dear ones home are hiring private vehicles as most of the ambulances at Gandhi Hospital are not in a working condition. Patients have to wait near the hospital for hours to take the dead body of their dear ones or hire private vehicles.There were 10 ambulances in Gandhi Hospital, but now, only four are in working condition while the remaining six are under repair, according to the officials. Patients are forced to spend a lot of money for hiring private ambulance. Also Read – Secunderabad: Major General N Srinivas Rao makes farewell visit to AOC Advertise With Us Speaking to The Hans India here on Tuesday, Yadaiah, an attendant of a patient, said, “The cost of the ambulance is much more than the cost of treatment. The poor cannot afford it.” A native of Ghatkesar, he was caught stranded at the hospital for want of money and could move his brother only after his relatives brought cash. There are close to 1,800 patients admitted at the hospital at any given point of time, while the bed strength is just over 1,000. Mallesh (name changed on request) a sub-staff at the hospital, said, “Poor patients just cannot afford to hire private ambulance.” Also Read – Kolkata artists giving final touches to 24 ft clay Ganesh idol Advertise With Us Private ambulances charge anywhere between Rs 2,000 to 3,000 even for a few km. Some people need ambulance to shift the patients to other hospital but they have to wait for hours for the ambulance. Senior doctors said that a proposal was submitted to the State government for more ambulances. The demand for ambulance service is huge. Many a time, the vehicles are sent to nearby towns as many patients from the towns close to Hyderabad visit Gandhi Hospital as most of the accident cases are referred there.last_img read more

Draculas Cannonballs – Incredible Find Connected to Vlad the Impaler

first_imgResearchers have discovered medieval cannonballs that they believe were used by the Wallacian Voivode (ruler) Vlad the Impaler, or Vlad III Dracula, also known as Vlad Tepes, during a battle in 1461 with the Ottoman Turks. The ruler of Wallachia was known for his savage battle tactics–including, yes, impaling–and also for inspiring Bram Stoker’s fictional depiction of Count Dracula, an aristocratic Transylvanian vampire with a peculiar hunger.Painting of Vlad TepesThe discovery was made in the ruins of a medieval fortress in Svishtov, a small town in the northern part of the country, by Professor Nikolay Ovcharov from the National Institute and Museum of Archaeology in Sofia and his team. “What’s really interesting is that from the [early] Ottoman period we have found cannonballs. We rejoice at those small cannonballs because they are from culverins,” Ovcharov said in an interview with Nova TV. “These were the earliest cannons which were for the 15th century, up until the 16th century, they weren’t in use after that. That was precisely the time of Vlad Dracula, there is no doubt that they are connected with the siege and conquest of the Zishtova Fortress by Vlad Dracula in 1461.”AdChoices广告inRead invented by TeadsSvishtov, Bulgaria. Photo by Mincov CC BY 3.0The archaeologist said it’s likely that Dracula stayed at the fortress after conquering it. “The truth is that Vlad Dracula besieged this place, conquered it, and most probably also resided here [briefly],” Ovcharov stated.Vlad fought many battles and had countless people done away with whom he considered enemies. His most hated opponent was the Ottoman sultan. During this time period, the Ottomans were attempting to conquer sections of Eastern Europe. In 1453, Sultan Mehmed II had conquered Constantinople, and the Ottoman powers stretched over the Carpathians, a threat to mainland Europe. By 1481 the Ottomans had control of the Balkans peninsula.In today’s odd news…https://t.co/Phck5d5j75— Chris Ciaccia (@Chris_Ciaccia) June 6, 2019What makes Vlad’s relationship to the Ottomans complex is that Vlad’s father had made a treaty with them and offered his own two sons, Dracula and Radu, to serve in their army and learn from them. When Vlad turned against them, he was a dangerous foe because of that knowledge. Once he was king, Vlad strengthened the Wallachian army to fight the Ottoman forces.Pope Pius II called for a crusade; Vlad pledged his allegiance to the Pope and the crusade. Vlad devastated the Bulgarian lands between Serbia and the Black Sea, including the fortress where the cannonballs were found. Vlad was killed in battle in 1477 and his head was sent to Sultan Mehmed. Today there is a statue of Vlad in Bucharest, where he is considered a folk hero.Related Video:The link between Vlad and Dracula comes from the word “dracul.” The King of Hungary inducted Vlad’s father into a knightly order called the Order of the Dragon. This designation earned him a new surname: Dracul. The name came from the old Romanian word for dragon, which is “drac.”His son, Vlad III, would later be known as the “son of Dracul,” or in old Romanian, Drăculea, hence Dracula. “In modern Romanian, the word “drac” also refers to the devil.)Statue of Vlad Tepes in Romania. Photo by CC BY-SA 3.0 ROVlad Tepes was born in 1431 in what is now Transylvania, the central region of modern-day Romania. But the link between Vlad the Impaler and Transylvania is a bit weak, according to Florin Curta, a professor of medieval history and archaeology at the University of Florida.“[Stoker’s] Dracula is linked to Transylvania, but the real, historic Dracula — Vlad III — never owned anything in Transylvania,” Curta said in an interview with Live Science. Bran Castle, a modern-day tourist attraction in Transylvania that is often referred to as Dracula’s castle, was never the home of the Wallachian prince.Bran Castle. Photo by Todor Bozhinov CC BY-SA 4.0“Because the castle is in the mountains in this foggy area and it looks spooky, it’s what one would expect of Dracula’s castle,” Curta said. “But he [Vlad III] never lived there. He never even set foot there.” According to the book Dracula: Sense and Nonsense, by Elizabeth Miller, in 1890 Stoker read a book about Wallachia. Although it did not mention Vlad III, Stoker was struck by the word “Dracula.” He wrote in his notes, “in Wallachian language means DEVIL.”Related Article: New Findings Suggest Vlad the Impaler was Imprisoned Beneath this CastleBram Stoker never came out and said that his vampire creation was Vlad the Impaler, only that he was from a noble family. The connection was made much more explicitly in Francis Ford Coppola’s film Dracula and in such novels as Elizabeth Kostova’s The Historian.Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, and InStyle, has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books. Her new book, The Blue, is a spy story set in the 18th-century porcelain world. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.comlast_img read more

Renowned terrible golfer Charles Barkley is slightly less horrible at hitting a

first_imgCharles Barkley in the batting cage. pic.twitter.com/Jp4Ev4H6ab— Michael Gallagher (@MikeSGallagher) June 6, 2016Maybe Chuck is onto something. Charles Barkley is a Hall of Fame basketball player and a natural on TV as an NBA analyst. Sir Charles also has, arguably, the most nausea inducing golf swing that has ever been witnessed by man. It’s been known to induce uncontrollable vomiting and cause temporary blindness if you stare at it to long.Barkley tried his hand at batting practice before the Cubs game tonight. Although he wasn’t exactly tearing the cover off the ball, his batting stroke is a masterpiece compared to his his NSFW golf hack. last_img read more

6 VPNs that can help you break through Chinas Great Firewall

first_imgPandaPow — Best easy-to-use China-centric VPN The Great Wall of China was originally built to keep barbarians out, and now the Great Firewall of China strives to do the same kind of thing in our digital era. Allowing the Chinese government to block access to foreign websites and slow down cross-border internet traffic, the Great Firewall is the largest system of censorship in the world. But if you’re traveling to the vast country, you can circumvent it using a virtual private network, or VPN. Take it from us: You don’t have to get blocked in China.While using a VPN in China is technically legal, providers play a game of cat-and-mouse with the authorities, which periodically crack down and try to block servers and throttle bandwidth, much to the annoyance of internet users. For example, a VPN ban reportedly came into effect in March, but nothing seems to have happened on the face of it at least, with providers being kept in the dark about if and when the ban will be rolled out.Users in China may have to swap VPNs if theirs becomes blocked, but having one is a necessity for anyone wanting unfettered access to foreign websites, from news sites to social media and Google. If you’re on vacation in China you’ll need a VPN for posting snaps to Instagram and keeping in touch with friends using Whatsapp. This is because VPNs assign a virtual IP address to obscure your real location from others, enabling you to circumnavigate geo-blocking and censorship measures as if you are based somewhere without them. VPNs also encrypt data, leaving your computer or device to make it impossible for others to see what you’re downloading, which is useful in a country where surveillance is a top priority for the authorities.The first thing to know about VPNs in China is that it’s easier to install one before you arrive, but how do you choose? Lots of servers (in China if possible), high speeds and extra layers of security are all important things to look for in a VPN offering. Reliable, 24/7 customer service is also an important consideration, because if you experience technical difficulties while you’re there, the fastest service available isn’t much use to you if you can’t troubleshoot.PureVPN — Best for servers in China and speed Image: purevpnPureVPN operates from Hong Kong and four of its 750+ servers are based in China itself, which is quite rare. This makes for some speedy connections while doing your part to battle the Chinese goverment. The VPN also offers its users unlimited bandwidth and five simultaneous connections. There are a whole bunch of security options, including industry standard 256-bit encryption, support for pretty much all protocols, built-in ad and malware blocking, DNS and IPv6 leak protection, and a kill switch. PureVPN has a self-managed network so your data is handled by PureVPN only, without the intervention or interference of any third-parties. There is also the option to use a NAT Firewall add-on, which provides an added layer of security by safeguarding a user’s device from hackers exploiting loopholes. The company claims to have a zero logging policy, although in 2017, a user was arrested partially due to session logs held by the VPN. This practice isn’t unusual, but may put some people off, particularly in a country where there is believed to be a lot of surveillance. There are lots of extra features with PureVPN, including split tunneling so users can decide which traffic is funneled through their VPN, unlimited server switching and data transfer, plus the ability to create a Wi-Fi VPN hotspot.When it comes to troubleshooting worries, PureVPN has live chat support for customers open every hour of the day, as well as ticket and email support. As with other offerings, there are apps for Mac OS, Windows, Android, and iOS devices and the company claims its product is easy to set up on gaming consoles and smart TVs too. Customers can pay for their subscriptions using an array of options, including Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. The best-value subscription costs just $2.88/month for two years, but the seven-day money-back guarantee has terms and conditions attached. ExpressVPN — Best all-around VPN for China Image: tunnelbearWhen it comes to free VPNs some experts are skeptical, but for those looking to save money on their travels, there’s TunnelBear. The Canada-based VPN is packed with features and has a sense of humour with a strong bear-theme running through its programs. For example, to connect to the VPN users choose a country and then another to connect to and watch a bear tunnel there when the connection is secure.There are apps for Mac, Windows, iOS, and Chrome and support for five simultaneous connections for premium accounts. When it comes to security, TunnelBear uses strong AES 256-bit encryption by default, the same level of encryption as many expensive services. There is also a feature called “VigilantBear,” a kill switch that blocks all unsecured traffic when you lose your Wi-Fi connection, until a device has safely reconnected again. “GhostBear” or stealth mode is another handy feature — particularly in China — which makes a user’s VPN-encrypted data less detectable to governments, businesses, and ISPs. It disguises OpenVPN traffic to help people get around firewalls by using obfsproxy, but can take a toll on speeds.The VPN has servers in 20 countries, but one downside is that not all of them are available to non-fee-paying customers, meaning potentially slower speeds. It’s doesn’t allow P2P torrenting, so users of BitTorrent should look elsewhere. Unlike many other VPNs TunnelBear doesn’t have a no logging policy, but instead keeps minimal logs for one month in order to comply with Canadian law, which could worry some users.TunnelBear has three types of subscriptions: Little Bear is free and gives users 500MB of data/month, while Giant offers unlimited data for $9.99/month on a monthly basis and Grizzly offers the same for $5/month based on a user signing up for a year. Image: bufferedLots of VPNs offer live chat support, but Buffered goes a little further. The Hungarian VPN offers round-the-clock technical support as well as a 30-day refund policy, which is a great way for users to check that they are happy with the service and a relatively unusual feature among VPNs.The VPN claims to offer high speed connections and has servers in Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan, as well as China itself. It also offers unlimited bandwidth with no download restrictions, which is ideal for fans of torrenting in China.Expats have reported the VPN works fine for accessing geo-blocked streaming services as well as popular foreign websites, but some people have found they are unable to access Netflix.Buffered offers military-grade encryption, a kill switch, and a no logging policy (aside from connections) when it comes to security, but while its plans and security measures are easy to understand, some users may be put off by a lack of apps for their devices. While the VPN provides detailed set-up instructions and the process is said to be fairly simple, it offers no apps for iOS, unlike most of its competitors. The subscription is also not the cheapest at $12.99/month or $7.62 for a “13 month special.” Image: nordvpnWhile China tends to focus its crackdowns on VPN providers, security and privacy is important to VPN users too. NordVPN has some neat security features, including shared IP addresses. Its Mac client uses Next Generation Encryption (NGE) IKEv2/IPsec as standard and 256bit-GCM for encryption, which is used by the military. There is also the option to use “Onion over VPN” or Double VPN servers, which means data is passed through two separate VPN servers instead of one. For users in China this means traffic can be re-routed to Taiwan, then travel through a server in Hong Kong before reaching its destination, which does take a toll on speed.NordVPN doesn’t keep logs of online activity. This means that your private data, online activity and browsing history can’t be monitored, gathered, exposed, or intercepted by third parties. Users can also select DNS leak protection to protect their IP address and an automatic kill switch, which either kills all programs or chosen programs if the VPN connection drops. This protects a user’s personal data from being temporarily exposed. There’s also ad-blocking functionality and protection against phishing threats.Users can link up to six devices simultaneously to NordVPN’s servers using apps for Mac OS, Windows, iOS, and Android. The service also boasts unlimited bandwidth for torrenting, decent download speed, and a 24/7 live chat tool for support. Expats have reported they have successfully used NordVPN to unblock geo-locked services including Netflix US, BBC iPlayer, and Amazon Prime Video, making it a popular choice for travelers wanting to keep up with the latest films and TV shows while in China.NordVPN may have 3,000 servers around the world, but one downside is that none of them are in China, meaning users in the country face speed penalties as internet traffic has further to travel. Nearby servers are located in Taiwan, South Korea, and Hong Kong. Another downside is that NordVPN’s monthly plan is relatively expensive, at $11.95/month. But the price drops significantly to $3.29/month as part of a two-year subscription. TunnelBear — Best free option Image: purevpn Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission.Image: Bob Al-Greene / Mashable IllustrationBy Sarah GriffithsMashable Deals2018-06-01 21:53:53 UTC Image: pandapow Image: pandapowAs its name suggests, Hong Kong-based PandaPow is designed to pack a punch in China, with decent speeds and security. But its biggest selling point is its simplicity.The self-dubbed “hassle-free VPN service” boasts instant activation with users able to get started in minutes thanks to a one-click set-up. While this may be a bit of an exaggeration, setting up the VPN is reportedly very easy. There is software for Mac, Windows, Android, and iOS accompanied with straightforward set-up guides. PandaPow is perhaps best known for its router/Wi-Fi set up, which is handy for anyone staying in the country for a while.The company also offers unlimited speeds, bandwidth and speed test usage, and unlimited server switches between 120+ servers in 16 countries. There’s also a filter feature in PandaPow Wi-Fi, which allows you to exclude or include the internet traffic traveling through the VPN connection, a feature typically seen in more expensive VPN offerings. When it comes to security, PandaPow does not log browser activity and reportedly offers strong encryption, but the details are a little vague. Some users have reported that sometimes when a VPN connection fails, which is common in China, the VPN doesn’t automatically resume, which could pose a security risk.PandaPow offers a number of plans, but its classic option costs $9/month on a monthly basis, or $84 for a year. They all come with a seven-day money back guarantee, which is really handy if the service isn’t right for your needs. Image: nordvpn NordVPN — Best for innovative security Image: tunnelbear Buffered — Best customer service and refund policy Image: expressvpn Image: expressvpnExpressVPN has a great mix of security, reliability, speed, and customer service, making it ideal for use in China.China’s Great Firewall is sophisticated enough to block basic OpenVPN connections, but Express VPN’ can circumnavigate the wall, with users reporting fast speeds, especially if they connect to Hong Kong, Los Angeles, or some other US servers which are said to be optimized for users in China. The service automatically finds the fastest server for you.Expats say the VPN works well to watch geo-blocked content from Netflix and YouTube, as well as other popular foreign streaming services. Users can enjoy unlimited bandwidth and they can connect to three devices simultaneously if they want.In a country where there’s censorship, security may seem particularly important. Express VPN boasts strong 256-bit AES encryption and support for lots of VPN protocols. The company offers a strict no logging policy and there’s a handy kill-switch, DNS/IPv6 leak protection, and a split tunneling feature for Mac and Windows, which allows users to protect their torrent client only. There’s also TOR compatibility.Customer service-wise, ExpressVPN offers 24/7 customer support and a bunch of apps for Windows, Mac, Android, iOS, and Linux to make life easier for users. Expats are particularly complimentary The downside is that it’s a little more expensive than its competitors. A one-month subscription costs $12.95, but there’s currently a deal for $6.67/month if you sign up for 15 months. There’s no free trial period, but there is a 30-day money back guarantee.  Image: bufferedlast_img read more

What to Consider When Comparing 64slice to Higher Slice CT Systems

first_img Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Technology Reports View all 9 items Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 08, 2016 What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. SCCT 2016 – 64-Slice CT vs Higher-Slice SystemsVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 12:21Loaded: 1.33%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -12:21 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Conference Coverage View all 396 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health View all 62 items Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reportingcenter_img Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Recent Videos View all 606 items Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D., FACC, FSCCT, director of South Florida Imaging Cardiovascular Institute, Holy Cross Hospital, at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2016 annual meeting. Smuclovisky explains what imaging departments need to know about when purchasing the newest generation of CT scanners. He explains there is more to scanners than slices, offering information beyond the hype over 64-, 128-, 256-, 320-, and 640-slice CT scanners.  For more information, read “Costs vs. Benefits: Comparing 64-Slice to 256, 320-Slice CT.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Sponsored Videos View all 142 items FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology View all 220 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System.last_img read more

Learning English in Costa Rica then and now

first_imgRelated posts:Claiming my Afro-Latinidad A look back at 1930s Limón and the real legacy of Afro-Caribbean immigrants Finding La Negrita: A story of coming home Dr. Charles Gourzong: Costa Rica’s visionary medicine man My two children, born in New York, are English speakers with a fair background in the basics of Spanish. They attend a private international school in Costa Rica where instruction is in English – except for Spanish class, of course, and the preparatory program for the Costa Rican high school exit exams. My 15-year-old son has emerged as a true Tico, as he can now roll off his tongue all themaes, esos and other soccer-field lingo that signifies “arrival.”For my husband and daughter, the journey has been a bit more treacherous. As for me, I have never had formal Spanish instruction, but I can understand, speak (tongue-tied much of the time) and write it. Yet much of my daily life involves English. The neighborhood we live in is a mix of U.S. and European expats and professional Costa Ricans who love speaking English with me, though I attempt to reply in Spanish. Outside of this enclave, of course, the Costa Rican world remains mostly Spanish-speaking. At the feria on Saturday morning, I have my regular vendors who greet me with fresh kale as we discuss the weather and their crops.I realize as I move between spaces that my worlds are language-driven. When I am with my Costa Rican family, conversation is generally in Spanish, with whispers when I need translation. I began to think about the significance of this since there are rumors that within 20 years, 60 percent of Costa Ricans will speak English.  I think that today, the majority of Costa Ricans who speak English fluently come primarily from two spaces: from an Afro/Caribbean-descended family, or from a private school education which was either bilingual or English-based. The latter indicates a class status. The former is based in a specific political and cultural tradition from the Caribbean coast which still has ramifications today.I love the fact that I can simply make a phone call to my maternal aunts and get all the information I need on their experiences growing up in Puerto Limón in the 1940s and 1950s. My Aunt Marjorie is the family storyteller; in West Africa she would be called a griot. A griot is a respected holder of communal knowledge, usually shared through word-of-mouth as part of a community’s oral tradition. Well, Tía Marjorie has a suitcase of knowledge that I am grateful for! I have always heard my mother and her sisters laugh about Sister Jesse and English school, but only until I spoke with my tias did I get a good idea about how they acquired English in Costa Rica.At the turn of the 20th century, the influx of Anglophone Caribbean immigrants into Puerto Limón and the surrounding area to work on the Northern Railway and the banana plantations of the United Fruit Company, created a “country” on the Caribbean coast that was fully autonomous from the central highlands of Costa Rica. These Caribbean immigrants – educated, religious and professional – established their churches, local newspapers, businesses, worker unions and social clubs, which were mostly church-based. These organizations helped the community articulate itself as it struggled with the identity politics of being of Caribbean origins and non-Costa Ricans (until 1948, when those of Caribbean lineage but born in Costa Rica could apply for naturalization). One of the great markers of this Caribbean identity was the creation and maintenance of private English schools by the local Black community.My tía tells me that her father, Jamaican-born and married to a black woman from Limón, insisted that his four daughters learn to read and write English as part of their cultural heritage.  My grandfather never learned Spanish, and he did not need to in the Limón of his time. My grandmother learned Spanish well into her 50s, once she was living in San Jose. The world of Puerto Limón was an English-speaking center which was cosmopolitan in its outlook, as it engaged with sailors from around the world. Newspapers about global events were widely circulated. There were several private English schools that Black children could attend, including those run by the Baptist and Methodist Churches. Sister Jesse, Teacher Thomas and Mr. Davidson, all of Caribbean descent, were some of the English teachers who ran these schools which offered a program complementary to that of the Spanish schools that the Costa Rican government mandated all children to attend.Enter the world of Sister Jesse! She was a member of the Methodist Church and my grandmother was her seamstress. Tall and imposing, she wore long skirts with full petticoats, frilly white blouses closed at the neck and laced-up black boots in the hot Limón sun! As an exchange for her sewing services, my grandmother was allowed to send her four daughters to Sister Jesse’s English school for free. It was located in a one-room building next to the Methodist Church, around the corner from Los Banos in Limón. So, in the early 1940s, my mother and her sisters went to the schoolhouse, mostly in the afternoons, from 1-3 pm after Spanish school.Sister Jesse’s classroom was divided into Primary and Secondary; she had a younger woman teach the Kindergarten, First and Second Grades about 15 students. Sister Jesse took the older students in one large mix, up to 25 students at a time. She taught English, Geography/History (British of course!), Math and Religion.Sister Jesse’s world was ordered and serious, and maintained the respectability politics of the immigrant Caribbean community of her time. My tia recounts that most of the teaching and assessment was done orally: the students would form a daily semicircle around Sister Jesse’s desk, with the head of the class going first. Everyone vied for that spot, because the last thing a student wanted was to be the tail. Class started with the times tables, then spelling and geography. My aunts admitted that they were naughty and chatted a lot in class, therefore rarely avoiding the punishment meted out at the end of the day by Sister Jesse.It was this Limon community that established the foundations of English literacy for its children as an act of political and cultural consciousness which remain strong today among many Afro-Costa Ricans. One of the initiatives for the United Nations Decade of Afro-Descendants is the support of English-speaking Afro-Costa Rican communities through the sharing and celebration of language and cultural norms. Costa Rican scholars such as Dr. Marva Spence Sharpe study Limonese linguistic patterns in order to preserve all of their wonderful influences in Costa Rica’s history.Read more of Natasha Gordon-Chipembere’s columns here.Natasha Gordon-Chipembere, a writer, professor and founder of the Tengo Sed Writers Retreats, moved to Heredia, Costa Rica with her family from New York in June 2014.  She is now accepting applications for Tengo Sed IV Writers and Yoga Retreat in Jan 2017. She may be reached at indisunflower@gmail.com. Her column “Musings from an Afro-Costa Rican” is published monthly. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Germany part funded bicommunal glossary

first_imgGermany’s contribution to a bi-communal glossary prepared under the wing of the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) was €25,000, the German ambassador to Cyprus said on Friday.Speaking to the Cyprus News Agency, ambassador Franz Josef Kremp said he supported the idea of the glossary, saying “it will encourage journalists to consider the sensitivities around certain words, and to offer them a useful tool of possible alternatives.”The glossary was a joint undertaking between two Greek Cypriot and two Turkish Cypriot journalists.It was launched earlier this week amidst polarized reactions. The OSCE thanked both Germany and the Netherlands for their financial contribution.Kremp told CNA Germany’s contribution of €25,000 was 50% of the cost.Earlier this week, the embassy posted on its Facebook page that “Germany is proud to be one of the main sponsors of this meaningful project that is contributing to the rapprochement of the Turkish and Greek Cypriots”.It contains 56 terms which may cause offence to communities from the island on the other side of the divide and contains alternative terms which are mutually acceptable.The embassy also backed statements by the OSCE representative on freedom of the media, Harlem Desir, who in the glossary’s foreword said the aim of the glossary is not to impose the use of words or terminology on journalists.“They are and should always remain free to write and report without restrictions. The glossary is also not about political correctness, but about encouraging new approaches and a new thinking on the most difficult issues, and a dialogue throughout and between the media communities.”Titled Words that matter: a glossary for journalism in Cyprus, the glossary sparked polarised reactions, with many journalists branding it an anathema and a restriction on freedom of speech.President Nicos Anastasiades jumped on the bandwagon too, saying it wasn’t the right time for such an initiative and expressing his discontent at the OSCE’s involvement.You May LikeCampusPlusThese Universities are nearly impossible to get intoCampusPlusUndoOrganixMag.com25 Health Benefits of AvocadoOrganixMag.comUndoHistoryDaily60 Once Beautiful Locations- What Happened To Them?HistoryDailyUndo Verstappen wins crazy German Grand PrixUndoBritish woman who claimed gang-rape taken to courtUndoMayors lobbying president to prevent local govt mergersUndoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more

Rep Runestad working on House legislation to ban sanctuary cities in Michigan

first_img Categories: Runestad News 15Jul Rep. Runestad working on House legislation to ban sanctuary cities in Michigan State Rep. Jim Runestad has begun work on a bill that would ban local sanctuary city policies that protect illegal aliens.“This is a pressing issue in our country given recent current events,” said Rep. Runestad, R-White Lake Township. “I have started work on a bill to address this issue at the state level and to protect Michigan’s hard working men and women.Sanctuary cities are cities that adopt policies that prohibit employees from notifying federal authorities of illegal aliens living in their communities. These policies alter the distinction between legal resident aliens and illegal aliens, which in some instances results in non-U.S. citizens being eligible for government benefits.Runestad adds that the legislation he is working on focuses on illegal aliens, not the many citizens who enter this country under legal means.“Immigration has been at the forefront of many national conversations and after recent events in San Francisco it is paramount we have protections against illegal aliens, especially those who continue to break the law once they have entered this country illegally.”A request for legislation has been submitted and a draft is expected back soon. Rep. Runestad plans to introduce his legislation as soon as the draft is finished.last_img read more

Rep Roberts votes yes on historic package to fix Michigan roads

first_img State Rep. Brett Roberts has voted in favor of a legislative package that will fix roads and bridges across the state of Michigan.“We’ve been working extremely hard, week in and week out, to find a compromise that fixes the roads quickly, and ensures their sustainability,” said Rep. Roberts, R-Eaton Township. “This is that plan.”The final roads plan allocates money from Michigan’s General Fund, as well as additional dollars that will be raised in new revenue. As normal inflation continues over time, the measure also creates a mechanism that triggers a decrease in the state income tax rate. In addition to providing funds specifically for roads, the plan provides $200 million in tax relief by expanding the Homestead Property Tax Credit for middle and low-income families across the state.“This compromise is the best plan for Michigan residents that has come across our desks. It uses ideas from both sides of the aisle that the House, the Senate, and Gov. Snyder can agree on,” Rep. Roberts said. “I’m proud that we were able to come together and unite with a plan that makes sense for Michiganders.”The plan now goes to Gov. Snyder for his signature.### 03Nov Rep. Roberts votes ‘yes’ on historic package to fix Michigan roads Categories: News,Roberts Newslast_img read more

Albion River Trail receives funding under bill approved in committee

first_img03Mar Albion River Trail receives funding under bill approved in committee The City of Albion could receive $294,000 for the Albion River Trail Expansion Project under a bill approved today in a state House committee, state Rep. John Bizon announced.The Committee on Appropriations today approved House Bill 5377, which includes the funding to Albion for the Albion River Trail Expansion Project.“I am excited to see some much-needed resources go to the City of Albion for a very important project,” said Rep. Bizon, R-Battle Creek. “I am very proud that the state is investing in Albion.”HB 5377 is sponsored by Rep. Jon Bumstead, R-Newaygo, and is part of a large project to connect trails across Michigan.The expansion project, including the Albion River Trail, will create a hub for several regional trail networks, including the Iron Belle Trail, the Great Lake-to-Lake Trail and the North Country Trail.The Albion portion of the trail could be ready for public use by the end of 2016.HB 5377 now goes to the House floor for consideration.##### Tags: Albion River Trail, REp. Bizon center_img Categories: Bizon News,Featured news,Newslast_img read more

Rep Allor Budget funds crucial military and veteran services programs

first_img21Mar Rep. Allor: Budget funds crucial military and veteran services programs Categories: Allor News State Rep. Sue Allor, member of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Military and Veterans Affairs, today voted to unanimously advance a budget plan prioritizing funds to strengthen military and veteran services throughout Michigan.The proposed budget includes:$6.5 million for the National Guard Tuition Assistance Fund;$7.7 million to be used for the Youth Challenge Academy and Starbase program, which service at-risk youth in Michigan;$5 million to expand state access to federal matching funds from the U.S. National Guard to enhance the state’s National Guard armories; andA placeholder for resources that will be provided to the County Veteran Service Fund, which provides grants to counties to support locally based veteran services.“Our budget prioritizes crucial functions within the Michigan Department of Military and Veterans Affairs while retaining important reporting requirements, which ensures quality oversight of the services our veterans receive,” said Allor, of Wolverine. “I am pleased that the plan includes proper checks, while remaining fiscally responsible.”House Bill 5570 now moves to the full House Appropriations Committee for consideration.last_img read more

Looking for Antiwar Messages at the Armed Services Committee Hearing

first_imgShareTweetShareEmail0 Shares September 16, 2014; USA TodayThe hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee yesterday morning began with repeated disruptions from antiwar protesters. Our guess is that some of the protesters were from Code Pink, an organization that has been diligent in speaking up against overseas U.S. military actions, whether conducted by the Bush administration or the Obama administration.Nonetheless, in response to President Obama’s authorization of expanded military actions against the Islamic State army that has conquered for the moment huge chunks of Syria and Iraq, the antiwar response has been noticeably more muted than it was in reaction to President Bush’s authorization of an invasion of Iraq in 2003. ISIL’s atrocities like repeated beheadings and mass killings have garnered attention like nothing since Al Qaeda, but both the right and the left have been mixed in their reactions to the president’s plan.The President has committed no U.S. troops engaging in combat (the euphemistic “boots on the ground”) but that scenario is difficult to avoid, whether in the near term, should U.S. advisors end up physically proximate to the fighting, or in the long run if, as with the original use of advisors in Vietnam, ever-increasing deployments add up to an inevitable military combat presence. The president pledged to conduct air attacks against ISIL, leaving the groundwork to the Kurdish Peshmerga, elements of the questionable Iraqi army, and whatever might be identifiable as the remnants of the Free Syrian Army. Attacking from the air is seen as an alternative to putting the Army and the Marines into direct combat against ISIL’s forces.  Notwithstanding the technical precision of modern air warfare, it still ends up killing civilians, especially when an opponent like ISIL might be embedded in civilian areas. Within relative moments of taking office, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi’s air force bombed a hospital in Fallujah, killing 42 people and wounding another 29. Killing from the air, where people on the ground are just about invisible, is not pristine.History would suggest that it’s time for the antiwar movement to raise important issues about the U.S. plan to deal with ISIL. Maybe this war against ISIL is different; maybe this is an instance where U.S. military action is necessary to stop ISIL, which has now gathered a large military force and deployed it like a professional army. Maybe ISIL can’t be dealt with the way that the U.S. is addressing Al Qaeda affiliates in Yemen and Somalia. But it is nevertheless the role of the anti-war movement to engage in and elevate the quality of the debate when American civilian and military leaders contemplate military action overseas.An editorial writer for the Dallas Morning News rhetorically asked the protesters speaking out at the Senate hearing if they had an alternative to military action to propose in stopping the threat of ISIL. However, the writer, Tod Robberson, acknowledged that past U.S. mismanagement of things in the region had been helpful to ISIL in recruiting adherents and questions whether the Obama administration’s upcoming actions with potentially limited support from coalition partners will simply exacerbate the perception that the war against ISIL is an American war.A consistently vocal antiwar group in recent times has been Win Without War. Its blog has included commentary that past efforts to arm Syrian rebels have led to equipment falling into the hands of ISIL, information on the various competing proposals in Congress to authorize military action, and a critique of U.S. policy in the Middle East as “perpetual war.” Win Without War has also linked to a cost-counter that is calculating what it is costing the U.S. ($312,500 every hour) for military action against ISIL.Nonetheless, the antiwar voice seems muted. A dozen or so placard-holding protesters at a Senate Armed Forces Committee hearing feels desultory. In an interview with the Real News Network’s Paul Jay, Code Pink’s Medea Benjamin attributes the weakness of the antiwar movement to President Obama:“It’s a one-word answer. Obama. And it wasn’t Obama getting in; it was the lead-up, it was the campaigning for Obama, when people were so desperate for an alternative to Bush that they said, I’m going to throw myself into this, I’m going to take off of work, students taking off of semesters, I’m going to put my life into getting this guy elected who said he was against the war in Iraq. And we put all our hopes and dreams into Obama, thinking that because he was against the war in Iraq and because he said Afghanistan was a good war—he didn’t really mean that; you know, he was just saying that to get elected. But he was a smart guy, and he understood that war was not the answer, and he was going to get us out.“And so the steam was just taken out of the whole movement. And it was amazing to see, because you said ‘tens of thousands.’ I mean, there were eight times during the Bush administration that we got over 100,000 people. And we had a huge movement. You just look at one group, like Code Pink; we came out of nowhere, and suddenly we had over 300,000 people on our mailing list, and we had over 300 groups around the country and, really, around the world…When Obama started to gain steam as a candidate, those started fizzling out. And when he won the election, we had half the numbers of people we had before on our mailing list. And most of the groups started to disintegrate.“So that was indicative of what was happening to the whole peace movement.”A prolific antiwar writer named John V. Walsh recently suggested in Counterpunch that the anti-war movement might deserve an “R.I.P.” He wrote that antiwar activists like Benjamin were “notorious by now for putting Party over principle,” and the Occupy movement, hardly much of a force at this time, had just about nothing to say about war and foreign policy during its brief heyday. Where is the voice and influence of an antiwar movement at a time when vigorous debate and analysis is needed?—Rick CohenShareTweetShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more

Nonprofit Taxes May Mean Final Kumbayahs for Some Maine Camps

first_imgShareTweetShareEmail0 SharesFebruary 12, 2015; WCSH-TV (Portland, ME)The Maine camping industry already contributes over half a billion dollars to the state’s economy each year, but Governor Paul LePage wants to squeeze just a bit more out. If approved, his plan would for the first time tax the real estate holdings of nearly 90 percent of the state’s nonprofit organizations, including the summer camps.LePage told a group in Waterville, Maine, that the intent of his $6.3 billion budget and tax overhaul plan is “to eliminate the income tax and send the money back to communities so people can decide what services they want and who is going to pay for them.” The plan comprises, according to the Wall Street Journal, lowering income taxes for the highest earning individuals and corporations, increasing the sales tax by including more goods and services, and providing tax credits for low-income residents. The governor also expects to save $62 million in his FY 2017 budget by eliminating funding to municipalities. To make up the loss of state funding, municipalities, in turn, will be required to tax nonprofits at 50 percent of assessed value over $500,000.For years, many municipalities have been managing the growing national debate over nonprofit taxation by receiving payments in lieu of taxes (PILOTs). The PILOTs are paid to municipalities and local governments to offset the loss of property taxes that would typically cover the use by nonprofits of public services including firefighting, policing, school construction, and search and rescue services. The federal government has been paying PILOTs since the mid-1970s to local governments that have non-taxable Federal lands within their boundaries.At question in the debate over taxing nonprofits is the issue of the value of nonprofit organizations to communities. An argument for tax exemption is that nonprofits provide services for the greater good of all that government cannot otherwise provide. Therefore, it is a fair trade that nonprofits should receive the benefits of other government services, such as fire and rescue, good roads, and policing, without cost. An argument for taxation is that nonprofits have become so large and prolific in some communities that individuals and businesses have seen their taxes increase to cover cost of government services use by all. Therefore, it is past time for nonprofits to step and pay their fair share for the services.As Governor LePage introduces his budget and tax plan, the current session of the Pennsylvania legislature will find lawmakers debating a constitutional amendment for the May ballot that gives the legislature greater power in determining whether nonprofits should receive tax exemptions. With regard to this bill, there appears to be three sides: those who oppose any taxation of nonprofits; those who want standardized, statewide uniformity with regard to taxes on nonprofits; and those who want to retain local control in establishing taxes on nonprofits.While the Pennsylvanians sort out who, if anybody, gets to tax nonprofits, the 100+ nonprofit camps in Maine eagerly wait to see if Maine becomes the first state to formally assess property taxes on nonprofits. If the plan is approved, some camps may close while others look for ways to cut back. Hmmm, maybe if the campers brought their own chocolate and graham crackers, too?—Tom KlausShareTweetShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more

Cable technology specialist Arris is to demonstrat

first_imgCable technology specialist Arris is to demonstrate support for the new DVB-C2 standard at the forthcoming Cable Congress in Brussels.The company will present a live demonstration of how the ARRIS D5 Universal Edge QAM can support DVB-C2 broadcast and VOD solutions through a collaborative demonstration with German cable operator Kabel Deutschland (KDG) and Sony.According to Arris, The demonstration will show how the D5 has enabled KDG to cost-effectively implement QAM sharing. A Sony TV with integrated DVB-C2 tuner, the world’s first TV set supporting the standard, will be used in the demonstration at the Arris stand.DVB-C2 uses the latest modulation and coding techniques to enable highly efficient use of cable networks, especially in cases where the downstream transmission capacity is already being used to its limit. KDG is currently planning the first delivery of digital TV services via DVB-C2.last_img read more

Vodafone Portugal has launched a new TV remote aim

first_imgVodafone Portugal has launched a new TV remote aimed at children. The Klik remote includes a dedicated Kids key that gives direct access to the kids channels on the platform as well as keys giving access to ‘favourites’, the VideoClube on-demand service and Gravador digital video recording.Vodafone has also launched a simplified Light remote control for adults that only want to access the main features of the TV service. Both remotes feature proximity sensors that illuminate the keys, and are available for €7.50 with Clube Viva points or for €19.99 in Vodafone stores.last_img read more

Israelbased satellite services provider RRsat is

first_imgIsrael-based satellite services provider RRsat is to launch a new C-band Multi-Channel Per Carrier (MCPC) platform for Africa, offering DVB-S2 capacity over the continent.The platform will be on Measat’s Africasat-1a satellite, to be launched early next year.The satellite will have coverage across Africa, the Middle East and Europe, enabling the new platform to offer full TV and radio coverage to the African continent.Yaniv Lior, senior director of US sales and operations at RRsat said: “In order to meet the increased needs of the fast growing African broadcast television market, we will launch a new C-band MCPC platform on Africacast-1a, that is able to cost-effectively bring content from Europe, Asia and the Americas for C-band contribution and distribution to Africa. This platform will provide leading TV and radio channels the opportunity to reach new audiences across the continent, based on the RRsat Global Network.”last_img read more

KPN chief financial officer Eric Hageman is to lea

first_imgKPN chief financial officer Eric Hageman is to leave the company due to personal circumstances. The Dutch telco said Hageman will leave the company and board of management with immediate effect. He was named interim CFO in January last year and confirmed in that position in September. The telco said it would make a further announcement about the CFO role in the near future.last_img

Digitalsmiths Seamless Discovery service for pers

first_imgDigitalsmiths’ Seamless Discovery service for personalised recommendations.The trend of ‘cord thinning,’ cutting one or more pay-TV services, is on the rise, with 16.9% of people decreasing or removing services in Q3, according to new research by video search and recommendation firm Digitalsmiths.The consumer trend survey noted a sequential rise in chord thinning from 13.4% in Q1 and 14% in Q2 with premium channels proving the highest-ranking service that was cut. However, 17.2% of consumers said they had actually increased their cable or satellite services.“While survey results on cord-cutting and cord-thinning prove customer retention should remain a focus among pay-TV providers, the latest growing trend is cord-cheating. A topic Digitalsmiths introduced in Q2 2013, cord-cheating refers to the continuing trend by consumers to seek on-demand video content from third-party services and OTT services as an alternative to their traditional pay-TV provider,” said Digitalsmiths.The survey found that 48.2% of respondents are now using subscription OTT services such as Netflix and Hulu, while 28.7% said they use third-party pay-per-rental services such as iTunes.By comparison, 72.9% of respondents said they never purchase from their pay TV provider’s VoD catalogue.In terms social media’s influence on viewing habits, Digitalsmiths found that 15.4% tweet or post what they are watching on TV to social networks, while 30.8% said they choose to watch something based on a TV show or movie’s social buzz.last_img read more

Harmonic will exhibit at ANGA COM in Hall 101 st

first_imgHarmonic will exhibit at ANGA COM in Hall 10.1, stand S10. Harmonic has launched NSG Exo, its new ‘distributed CCAP’ platform targeting cable and telecom operators that have deployed fibre-deep networks but wish to connect end users via coax.According to Harmonic, NSG Exo is a cable edge device for enabling the deployment of a Distributed Access Architecture (DAA) utilizing coax networks.NSG Exo, described as a distributed CCAP system, allows service providers to move their RF delivery requirements out of the headend or hub and deeper into the network, according to the company.The CCAP-ready system includes DOCSIS/EuroDOCSIS/J-DOCSIS CMTS capabilities, with universal edgeQAM capabilities to be added in the future.The NSG Exo, sitting at the edge of a network in the basement of a multiple dwelling unit or as an outdoor unit, can deliver narrowcast services to end users utilizing a GbE, GPON or EPON network.Asaf Matatyaou, director of cable edge solutions at Harmonic, said that the advantage of the technology is that operators “can take the Ethernet digital connection all the way to the premises and have the CCAP functionality in the basement of a building or on a telephone pole. You can eliminate RF from the hub. Running digital is much cheaper, and you eliminate power and space requirements from the hub.”Operators can run fibre to the premises and use in-building coax to deliver services to the DOCSIS modems in end users’ homes, he said.Matatyaou said that it makes sense to implement all DOCSIS functionality, including MAC and PHY layers, in a single device rather than retaining one or other in a centralised hub, which requires interoperability between different devices.Matatyaou said that Harmonic is initially deploying the NSG Exo as a distributed CMTS – outputting DOCSIS – but that it could add edgeQAM functionality through a software upgrade. However, he said, the current demand is for CMTS functionality.He said the platform could support the higher order 256QAM modulation in the upcoming DOCSIS 3.1 specification.Matatyaou said Harmonic is currently in multiple trials across the world for the product and plans to launch it commercially in the third quarter. An outdoor version will be commercialised later.last_img read more

Pay TV revenues will increase just 06 this year

first_imgPay TV revenues will increase just 0.6% this year as subscribers move to bundled services, according to new forecasts from Digital TV Research.As customers sign up for double and triple play services, operators generate higher overall revenues per user, but the proportion commanded by TV decreases.Digital TV Research forecasts that region-wide revenues will be US$40.35 billion this year, a fractional year-on-year increase. Western Europe will generate the bulk of the total, accounting for US$33.8 billion of the 2014 forecast.By territory, the UK, Germany, France, Italy and the Netherlands will be the largest markets respectively, in revenue terms.Satellite TV will contribute 45.6% of the pay TV revenues in 2014. However, satellite TV revenues are falling, partly due to greater competition but also due to the growth of cheaper packages, such as Tricolor in Russia, which force down prices for the whole country. Pay DTT revenues are also suffering. However, IPTV will record strong revenue growth. Digital cable revenue growth will compensate for the decline in analog cable revenues.Pay TV subscriptions will increase from 154.5 million in 2010 to 171.6 million by end-2014, but the Western European total will rise by only 4.0 million to 97.3 million. Eastern Europe subscriber totals will climb by 13.1 million to 74.4 million.last_img read more

Liberty Globalowned German cable operator Unityme

first_imgLiberty Global-owned German cable operator Unitymedia KabelBW is to extend the availability of the Horizon advanced TV paltform to Baden-Württemberg from November 3.The operator launched Horizon in North-Rhine Westphalia and Hesse in September, but only the Horizon Go mobile version of the service has been available in Baden-Württemberg.Unitymedia KabelBW CEO Lutz Schüler said Horizon had already attracted over 135,000 customers in North-Rhine Westphalia and Hesse, while Horizon Go had attracted over 125,000 users to date.Schüler said that the operator had increased its available internet speed to 200Mbps to accommodate the convergence of TV and broadband services and planned to increase speeds still more next year.Liberty Global has been attempting to migrate its Horizon platform to the RDK platform and a cloud-based architecture for new launches. The initial versions of Horizon were based on Cisco’s architecture.last_img read more

Swiss service providers Swisscom Sunrise UPC Cab

first_imgSwiss service providers Swisscom, Sunrise, UPC Cablecom, Orange and the cable network companies’ association Swisscable have teamed up to adopt a common position on net neutrality.The operators have formulated a code of conduct and are to create a new Ombudsman office that will monitor net neutrality in the country.Principles adopted include that no services or applications will be blocked and that freedom of information and the free expression of opinion will not be restricted.The code states that bandwidth may be managed under some circumstances, for example to comply with official rulings and to prioritise time-critical services such as IP telephony, TV, emergency calls, video conferencing and future telemedicine applications.Where it is suspected that a service provider is in breach of the code, users will be able to call on the ombudsman’s office, which will draw on the expertise of independent consultants in examining the case and mediating between users and service providers.last_img read more

Liberty Globalowned cable operator UPC Poland is

first_imgLiberty Global-owned cable operator UPC Poland is to launch a full Horizon advanced TV offering, making available a decoder that provides access to advanced TV, internet and telephony, in the New Year. UPC Poland, which has already made the Horizon Go service available, has invited a select group of its customers to trial the set-top box service ahead of its commercial launch. The decoder, which provides access to social media sites including Facebook, YouTube and Twitter on TV as well as personalised navigation, is equipped with a double-sided QWERTY keyboard for easier use of advanced features.The box allows users to record up to four programmes simultaneously while watching a fifth, to record programmes remotely via the Horizon app, to pause live TV and to access a variety of internet sites.Grzegorz Esz, UPC Poland board member responsible for marketing, said that the launch of Horizon would provide the operator’s customers with the “the best experience in the use of television in Poland”.last_img read more

Vodafone Spain has added commercial broadcaster At

first_imgVodafone Spain has added commercial broadcaster Atresmedia’s male-focused Mega channel to its Vodafone TV programming line-up.Mega airs a mix of series, movies and factual programming aimed at men over 25, including Carl Sagan’s Cosmos, Bonnie and Clyde and Sons of Liberty. It airs movies including a complete run of the Hames Bond films.Atresmedia launched Mega as a free-to-air channel in July, using the terrestrial frequency previously occupied by sports service GolT, which was replaced by the new BeIN Sports channel.last_img read more

Dariusz Dąbski Polands Telewizja Puls the operat

first_imgDariusz DąbskiPoland’s Telewizja Puls, the operator of the national TV Puls and Puls 2 channels, has extended its advertising deal with TVN Media to cover 2016.Under the new one-year deal, TVN Media, under the brand Premium TV, will continue to provide commercial representation to Telewizja Puls – Poland’s third-largest commercial TV provider.The two companies have already been working together for five years and Telewizja Puls’ president of the management board, Dariusz Dąbski, described the partnership as a “fruitful and reciprocally beneficial cooperation.”Markus Tellenbach, TVN’s president and CEO said: “Our soon to come sixth year of partnership denotes further development of our extensive and advantageous advertising brokerage offer.”last_img read more

Orange customers in Poland can now access SPI Inte

first_imgOrange customers in Poland can now access SPI International’s FilmBox Live VoD app via their mobile accounts with zero data charges.The move gives Orange subscribers unlimited access to the FilmBox Live service, enabling them to watch FilmBox content on PCs, laptops, smart TVs and PlayStation game consoles.SPI International is offering a range of live channels including the Kino Polska, Kino Polska Muzyka and FilmBox movie channels, FightBox, Fast&FunBox, DocuBox, FashionBox and 360TuneBox.In addition to the mobile TV offering, the company has launched its Kino Polska Muzyka channel on Orange TV’s basic package, taking the reach of the Polish music channel to 7.5 million homes.SPI International’s on-demand offering is the only video-on-demand service offered by Orange Poland apart from its own Telewizja Tu i Tam service.last_img read more

Paolo Bertoluzzo Vodafones group chief commercial

first_imgPaolo BertoluzzoVodafone’s group chief commercial operations and strategy officer Paolo Bertoluzzo is leaving the group to take up the post of CEO of ICBPI, a financial and payment services company in Italy.Bertoluzzo, seen as number two in Vodafone to CEO Vittorio Colao, joined the company in 1999 as strategy and business development director and was appointed to his current position in 2013, taking a central role in the definition of the group’s strategy and the design and direction of Vodafone’s group-wide commercial plans.Vodafone said his successor would be announced in due course.Colao said “Paolo has been an outstanding colleague who has made an immense contribution during his time in Italy and on our Executive Committee. I would like to thank him for his dedication, friendship and wise advice. I wish him every success in his new role, which I know he will undertake with the devotion and commitment that drove so many valuable and effective initiatives during his 17 years with Vodafone.”last_img read more

Kresimir Madunović Deutsche Telekomowned Croatian

first_imgKresimir MadunovićDeutsche Telekom-owned Croatian operator T-Hrvatski Telekom has named Kresimir Madunović as the new CEO of its Iskon internet service provider subsidiary.Madunović takes over from Saša Kramar, who has led the company for the last 14 years. Kramar will now serve as vice-president and general manager for business customers with T-Hrvatski Telekom.Madunović was previously in charge of residential sales, customer support and marketing at Iskon.Iskon, which recently launched a new smart home initiative, is a low-cost provider offering a range of services targeted at a younger demographic, including a TV service.last_img read more

Bruce Tuchman ExAMC Global president Bruce Tuchma

first_imgBruce TuchmanEx-AMC Global president Bruce Tuchman has joined the board of television data firm Parrot Analytics, and will invest in the company this year.Tuchman left his role as AMC Global and Sundance Channel Global boss earlier this year, and has since been consulting for the media technology sectors since that point.This makes him a good fit to advise Parrot, which offers insight into demand for individual programmes and trends in specific territories and regions through a scientifically-designed analytics software tool.Significantly, this offers some idea of how SVOD original programming is performing, as Netflix and Amazon Prime Video do not release any data.Tuchman is joining the board alongside former Sony Pictures and MGM home entertainment president David Bishop. Both men plan to invest in LA- and Auckland-based Parrot in coming months.Before running AMC’s international channels business, Tuchman did the same for MGM Worldwide Networks. AMC Networks acquired the MGM channels’ business through a US$1 billion deal for its parent, Chellomedia, and then integrated them within the new merged operation.Before MGM, Tuchman was senior VP, new media ventures for Nickelodeon and general manager of Nickelodeon Global Network Ventures. He began his career as a mergers and acquisitions associate at transatlantic law firm Skadden Arps.“Traditional panel-based measurement services are not meeting the demands of an increasingly fractured and data-starved media market,” said Tuchman. “Parrot’s cross-platform, global demand measurement system provides very powerful, intuitive and  empirical data to measure the true demand for thousands of television shows across every country on earth.“I’m proud to join the board of Parrot which, under the leadership of [Parrot CEO] Wared Seger, has developed a unique and truly game-changing technology.”“Bruce and David bring a wealth of business experience and leadership which will provide Parrot Analytics with the strategic insight we require as we become a global, brand-driven business and as we seek to establish successful partnerships across international markets,” said Seger.“Parrot Analytics’ mission is to advance the television industry’s data-driven capabilities and we are delighted to be able welcome Bruce and David to the Parrot team to help us achieve that goal.”last_img read more

Julian Hector The BBC has appointed veteran produc

first_imgJulian HectorThe BBC has appointed veteran producer Julian Hector as head of its respected Natural History Unit.The NHU is part of BBC Studios, the UK public broadcaster’s overarching production division, and Hector assumes the role vacated by Wendy Darke earlier this year amid a raft of management changes.Darke has since set up her own production company, True to Nature.Hector is a veteran wildlife producer and has been editor of Natural History Radio at the BBC. His TV credits over the last two decades include credits include Battle of the Sexes, Saving Species, Migration and Ivory Wars.He said: “This is such an important time to lead the Natural History Unit. We thrill our audiences with the extreme close-up and immerse them in the wonderful world of nature; and with people and nature ever more challenged to share the same space on earth it has never been more important to tell stories of that relationship.”In other changes at the NHU, Oliver Thompson takes on an expanded commercial role as head of business. Reporting to Hector, he is being upped from head of production.He said: “The launch of BBC Studios means the NHU is at a critical point in its evolution and we need to create the right environment for our creative and business teams to thrive. This presents a huge opportunity for us to bring our world-class content to new customers and new platforms, and deliver value back to BBC licence fee payers.”Lisa Opie, BBC Studios director, factual, added: “I’m delighted that the world class credibility and heritage of the Natural History Unit is in such strong hands.“Julian brings passion, vision and vast experience to the Unit. Oli will drive the business through this important and challenging transition into the competitive market. Together they’ll make a powerful team.”Opie landed her post in June, as new BBC Studios chief Mark Linsey appointed a trio of executives with significant business acument to lead the factual, scripted, and entertainment, music and events divisions. Roger Leatham bagged the entertainment post, and Nick Betts became genre chief of scripted.last_img read more

Netflix is in advanced talks to acquire Luc Besson

first_imgNetflix is in advanced talks to acquire Luc Besson’s studio EuropaCorp, according to a report in financial daily Les Echos.According to the paper, citing an unnamed source, a deal could be announced in a few weeks. EuropaCorp is responsible for Besson movies including Lucy and Valerian: City of a Thousand Planets.EuropaCorp’s Paris-listed shares rose sharply on the news. According to Les Echos, an agreement was close to being signed last month but one of the two parties returned to the negotiating table to seek better terms.EuropaCorp told Les Echos that it was in discussion with “several potential financial and/or industrial partners, but that it had not as of yet entered into exclusive discussions with any individual party.According to the paper, any agreement would guarantee Besson freedom to develop a certain number of films, with remuneration based on their success.EuropaCorp has three titles in its pipeline over the next few months: Besson’s crime thriller Anna, police thriller Taxi 5 and Kursk, a film about the Russian submarine disaster.Netflix has had an uneasy relationship with the French film community. Last year, the Cannes Film Festival said it would stop films that had not been released theatrically from competing for the Palm d’Or after Netflix titles The Meyerowitz Stories and Okja were entered in competition despite neither being released theatrically ahead of being streamed on the platform.last_img read more

Liberty Globalowned cable operator UPC Hungary ha

first_imgLiberty Global-owned cable operator UPC Hungary has tapped Agama Technologies to supply its video assurance platform.Mikael DahlgrenBy implementing the Agama video assurance platform in its head-end and network, UPC will have real-time access to information and insights on service performance at multiple points in the delivery network, according to Agama.“By choosing Agama’s modern, software-based solution, we are able to get great support for both automated monitoring as well as visual inspection. We now have a real-time view of the delivery chain with key metrics directly available for our services, from the head-end and through the network,” said Tibor Szabadszallasi, video manager at UPC.“As a long-time Agama partner, we are thrilled to support the deployment of the Agama solution at UPC Hungary.”Mikael Dahlgren, CEO at Agama Technologies, said: “It is always a pleasure to design quality assurance solutions together with operators with as high ambitions as UPC Hungary. We feel honored to have been selected by them and are really looking forward to our collaboration.”last_img read more

Richard Halton YouView chief executive Richard Hal

first_imgRichard HaltonYouView chief executive Richard Halton is to stand down at the end of this year to pursue new opportunities.The UK hybrid digital TV platform, which is jointly owned by BT, TalkTalk, the BBC, ITV, Channel 4, Channel 5 and Arqiva, said that Halton, who led YouView from launch, had decided the moment was right to step down.YouView is currently in three million UK homes, mostly through its use by BT and TalkTalk to deliver TV services as part of a multiplay offering.Halton was controller of business strategy at the BBC, where he led development of YouView predecessor Project Canvas, before becoming CEO of YouView when the company was formed in 2010.YouView said that a search was already underway for a replacement.Simon Duffy, chairman of YouView said: “YouView is now a world class technology platform which blends the best of the UK’s major broadcasters and communication companies with digital OTT services. Richard has been a major contributor to this success, marshalling a unique partnership between YouView’s seven shareholders – BT, TalkTalk, the BBC, ITV, Channel 4, Channel 5 and Arqiva. We wish him well in his future endeavors.”Halton said: “It has been a fantastic 10 years at the helm of an extraordinary business – one that now shapes the way three million homes find and watch television. To have led YouView through such an exciting time in the TV industry has been a privilege and I would like to thank my team as well as our shareholders and partners for their unerring support, commitment and energy. After a decade I feel it is time to move on and explore new opportunities, knowing that I leave YouView well set for the future.”last_img read more

Maltese cable operator Melita has launched a 1Gbps

first_imgMaltese cable operator Melita has launched a 1Gbps internet service that is available across its entire footprint.The move, which has enabled Melita to claim that Malta is the first country in Europe where 1Gbps broadband is available nationwide, follows upgrades to the operator’s HFC infrastructure that have also reduced latency on the network, according to the company.Melita is offering the service as part of its GigaPower product line whilst also delivering dedicated fibre services to offices and business centres.Harald Roesch, CEO at Melita Limited, said, “This is an historic milestone for Melita and for Malta. After being the first to roll out a 5G-ready mobile network last December, we have now achieved another first, delivering Gigabit internet nationwide. Our ongoing investments in infrastructure continue to ensure Malta retains its position as one of the best-connected countries in the world, while also future proofing our network for the coming Internet of Things era.”last_img read more